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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Austin
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    89
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    Quote Originally Posted by technocratic View Post
    I dont mean to be negative, but at what point do you tear your house down, put on a hermetically sealed space suit? I appreciate that you are innovating and it probably has a place in industrial sites (maybe) but to your average home owner? I seriously doubt it. Not only that, but once we alert on a VOC, or other bit of nasty, what is the solution? Tear the house down, and climb into your space suit?

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
    For the *average* home - I agree. But not all homes are average as I learned the hard way.

    I purchased a condo a couple of years ago. Previous owners didn't vacate for a month after initial home inspection. I didn't move in for another 3 months after that.
    Immediately after closing I noticed *smells*. I was told these were just residual odors from the excellent cleaning job that the previous owners did before vacating - nothing to worry about. They faded over the next few weeks but didn't go away. I was advised not to worry. A month before I moved in I contacted the home inspection company. They told me all is fine, nothing to worry about. I wanted to believe them. After moving in there were still residual odors.

    I didn't know squat about IAQ issues, but quickly learned 2 important points.
    1. VOC levels can be accurately measured, relatively inexpensively.
    2. There are standards so these measurements can be evaluated.

    Shortly after testing I called the home inspection company and told them that they were wrong, that had an issued determined by objective testing. Their response - "Sorry but we don't know anything about IAQ so don't hold us accountable". I then asked them -if you don't know anything about IAQ why did you tell me there was nothing to worry about??They were silent. What really irks me is that they has a list of local IAQ experts that they could have recommended but didn't.

    In my case levels were about 700% above maximum acceptable levels and some of the VOCs were of the more objectionable types.
    I've got a background in the basic sciences/engineering and research so I studied up. Found a lot of over hyped claims without substantiation. I've tested a number of solutions (mainly in the magic box category).

    Fresh air intake, bake outs, ventilation - the old standards do work, but there are still issues.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    700
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    Dr. Iain Walker of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has done a very good analysis of low cost IAQ monitors. His findings are summarized in this Powerpoint presentation:

    [URL="http://conference2018.resnet.us/data/energymeetings/presentations/RESNET2018_LBL_LowCostMonitors_walker.pdf"]

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    700
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  4. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Austin
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    89
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    Great paper - thanks.
    I"ve been looking for input on this new class of dectector.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    3
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    If you want to use standart VOC sensor (metal-oxid methode sensor), you must understand that the precision of such sensors aren't very high. Sometimes the sensor could show high level of VOC in the air for H2, H2O or non-VOC gases.

    But there are no one another sensor even for 1000$ that could measure VOC more exactly and could exactly measure only VOC.

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