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  1. #1
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    Cpvc gasketed female adapters

    I'm a hvac tech and Undergoing a project for a buddy who had a bunch of pipes burst this winter. I personally have never seen a whole house pipes in cpvc but what ever. Point is even after replacing vetting leaks with new fittings afire failed pressure test once all the busted pipes where fixed in down to soap and bubbles to find the little leaks- now this may have been my mistake but I noticed that cpvc female adapters have a gasket in them- not knowing any better i wrapper the remaining galvanized with tape like I normally would with gasket in place and low and behold it leaked/ not bad just enough to piss you off- some froth with bubbles. After reasearching one manufacturer said not to use tape or dope but rather " pipe sealant" what the hell is sealant? I mean is that not pipe dope- plus I was always under the impression that dope was a no no on pvc/cpvc as the oils can damage it same with glycol- so I guess I really screwed up with soap test. Hmmmm if glycol is so damaging to pvc propelyne glycol is in dish soap? Why no controversy there?
    "It's just like it doesn't work. I mean it seems to be ok now, but it usually like never works"

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  2. #2
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    Female cpvc fittings are a bad idea. Put a brass or stainless steel (SS is cheaper) coupler on the metal and thread new plastic into the coupler using standard teflon tape.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    Put a brass or stainless steel (SS is cheaper) .
    Why not just galvanized as was the way once upon a time?


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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by dave1234 View Post
    Why not just galvanized as was the way once upon a time?


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    you can, i prefer to not use "substandard" fittings when I sell something. Galvanizing back then was something. Today, not so much...

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    you can, i prefer to not use "substandard" fittings when I sell something. Galvanizing back then was something. Today, not so much...
    Well I am not selling anything- all pro bono to help a freind. Well I shouldn't say that- I do get occasional hot dog or spaghetti.


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  6. #6
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    Female adapters are good for... well nothing. If the end of the pipe isn't flat or square, it'll leak. Too loose, it'll leak. Too tight, it'll break.... and leak. Getting more than one to seal out of a bunch is like playing the lottery.
    Maybe some Blue Block if you really need to go that route. Have fun if you ever need to get it apart.
    -----Stop, step back, relax and have another go at it.-----

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  8. #7
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    They make cpvc female adapters that have metal threads. I think they're called "transition female adapters". That's what I would use. They look like this...


    2nd choice, since the pipe is already galvanized, I would use a galvanized coupling with a cpvc male adapter. Don't get a standard "thread protector" type coupling though. Get what's called a "galvanized malleable coupling" that looks like this...


    By the way, did you know you aren't supposed to pressure test cpvc pipe with air. I read that in some installation instructions from Flowguard Gold a few years ago. CPVC has been known to shatter and explode when filled with pressurized air, so I guess don't do that (or at least don't do it again).

    PEX would have been a much better choice.
    If at First You Don't Succeed, Skydiving Is Not for You.

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    you can, i prefer to not use "substandard" fittings when I sell something. Galvanizing back then was something. Today, not so much...
    That's funny. We are talking about fastening CPVC to galvanized pipe here, and you're worried about the galvanized coupling attached to the galvanized pipe as being the weak link. What would you have used to repair the broken sections of CPVC with, short chunks of stainless pipe patched into it somehow?

    Of course there's nothing wrong with using brass or stainless, it just struck me as kind of humorous in this example for some reason.

    If at First You Don't Succeed, Skydiving Is Not for You.

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ammoniadog View Post
    That's funny. We are talking about fastening CPVC to galvanized pipe here, and you're worried about the galvanized coupling attached to the galvanized pipe as being the weak link. What would you have used to repair the broken sections of CPVC with, short chunks of stainless pipe patched into it somehow?

    Of course there's nothing wrong with using brass or stainless, it just struck me as kind of humorous in this example for some reason.

    Im not worried about the fitting being the weak link. Im worried about attaching old crap to new crap that the OP has to warrant. Ive seen NEW galvanized fittings cause rust staining in white porcelain. It doesnt remove. It's just what the OP would need to have the customer say "well it wasnt there before you put your parts in there!"

    It's old galvanized pipe. It's crap. Not from the initial quality standpoint, but from age and use. I'd rather not introduce yet another crappy part, even though it's new. The best way is to put on a transition fitting - either like the fitting shown that's both cpvc and metal, or a straight metal female fitting that the plastic goes into. I would use a stainless steel coupler on the galvanized with a male cpvc fitting into that. I would use SS mainly because it is cheaper now that the LF brass mandate has taken effect. Almost 3 times less costly.

  11. #10
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    Why would anyone use galvenized for water these days.

    My grandparents' home was done in galv, and 30-50 years later is is a disaster to work on.
    Touch it with a wrench and it crumbles!!
    Look inside and see the corrosion/rust and think that is what you are bathing in, cooking, cleaning and drinking!!!
    The Food Stamp Program, administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, is proud to be distributing the greatest amount of free meals and stamps EVER.
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  13. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ammoniadog View Post
    They make cpvc female adapters that have metal threads. I think they're called "transition female adapters". That's what I would use. They look like this...


    2nd choice, since the pipe is already galvanized, I would use a galvanized coupling with a cpvc male adapter. Don't get a standard "thread protector" type coupling though. Get what's called a "galvanized malleable coupling" that looks like this...


    By the way, did you know you aren't supposed to pressure test cpvc pipe with air. I read that in some installation instructions from Flowguard Gold a few years ago. CPVC has been known to shatter and explode when filled with pressurized air, so I guess don't do that (or at least don't do it again).

    PEX would have been a much better choice.
    Really. That's interesting. Can the same be said for nitrogen? I'd assume 50-60 psi is 50-60 psi be it compressed air or nitrogen.


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  14. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by BennyD View Post
    Maybe some Blue Block if you really need to go that route. Have fun if you ever need to get it apart.
    Also what is blue block? Never heard of it. Certainly see leak lock around here that is blue and that absolutely hardens. That was part of my initial question that manufacturers recommend no pipe dope but a non hardening "sealant"- what the hell is "sealant" opposed to pipe dope?


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    "Never an always and always a maybe"

  15. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    Im not worried about the fitting being the weak link. Im worried about attaching old crap to new crap that the OP has to warrant. Ive seen NEW galvanized fittings cause rust staining in white porcelain. It doesnt remove. It's just what the OP would need to have the customer say "well it wasnt there before you put your parts in there!"

    It's old galvanized pipe. It's crap. Not from the initial quality standpoint, but from age and use. I'd rather not introduce yet another crappy part, even though it's new. The best way is to put on a transition fitting - either like the fitting shown that's both cpvc and metal, or a straight metal female fitting that the plastic goes into. I would use a stainless steel coupler on the galvanized with a male cpvc fitting into that. I would use SS mainly because it is cheaper now that the LF brass mandate has taken effect. Almost 3 times less costly.
    I agree however as it's all free work for a freind- not that that affects my workmanship- I'm not insisting on using galvanized but re-plumbing the whole house and what little galvanized still remains and hasn't been redone with cpvc- which I've never seen a whole house don't in cpvc- isn't really in his budget. No good deed goes unpunished.


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