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  1. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by beenthere View Post
    Not if he didn't realize the thermostat is set to auto.
    I'll mention it to the next tech I get out here but I'm inclined to believe the installer when he said it's expected behavior. The system is 8 years old and has always run between cycles.

    And you've got to figure the chances are slim that a shortage on the board would only affect that one aspect of the system? We were careful not to freeze the system over too badly once we realized the compressor was running with no blower on the inside.

  2. #15
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    It's not expectex behavior. It isn't designed to have the blower running all the time unless it is set to run all the time. Something is keeping that blower on. It's either set to run all the time or it is malfunctioning. My guess from here is the latter.

  3. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by flanders View Post
    It's not expectex behavior. It isn't designed to have the blower running all the time unless it is set to run all the time. Something is keeping that blower on. It's either set to run all the time or it is malfunctioning. My guess from here is the latter.
    Well based on what the techs I've had out have said: the installer says it's supposed to do that. The 2nd tech said it's not supposed to, and he can't change it because he has no idea what the installer did to make it run all the time. The installer won't come out to change it because he insists it's normal for my system and it won't improve the humidity.

    Is this something any tech should be able to fix? Should I call the manufacturer?

  4. #17
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    Any tech may not be able to find the problem but any decent tech should. U may need to try a different company.

  5. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by flanders View Post
    Any tech may not be able to find the problem but any decent tech should. U may need to try a different company.
    Is it better to keep it simple with these guys and tell them: I have high humidity, what can you do?

    Or just call them out and tell them I want the blower to stop running constantly.

    Both guys I've talked to didn't make the connection between the constant fan re-evaporating moisture back into the house over a wet coil.

  6. #19
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    I'd tell them that the blower won't shut off.

  7. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by flanders View Post
    I'd tell them that the blower won't shut off.
    OK, appreciate the input. Only asking since I've had a steak of bad luck with these guys.

  8. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by htcrx8 View Post
    The temp of the home is typically 72-74F, RH 60-65% during the day, 65-70% at night. It's raining today and its 72F/68%RH inside.

    How should I be measuring the supply? I stuck my humidity reader on the vent and gotten inconsistent results. The temp seems to take a while to adjust. One day I got 58F/58%RH, today (it's raining out) I got 64F/65% RH. Both cases, the temp seems to stay the same through out the cycle, and the RH creeps up slowly.
    That 58^F, 58%RH reading is a good one. Indicates that the dew point of the air is 43^F, with a 72^F, 68%RH, a 60^F dew point is a 17^F drop in dew point. This is great and the type of function we are looking for. This is an example having equipment beyond typical techs ability to deal with. Simple a/cs with single stages are better suited to the techs ability to setup. In either case, get your a/c setup to maintain <50%Rh during high sensible cooling loads and add a small whole house dehumidifiier to system to maintain <50%RH during evenings and rainy days.
    Check out the Ultra-Aire whole house units.
    I was in Eastern PA Bally on thursday consulting with a moisture issue in wood finishing plant.


    The cycles seem a bit short, they typically don't run for longer than 10-12 minutes. On days where it's moderate out it will on average 7-8 minutes maybe 4 times an hour.

    Like I said I believe the fan running at a low speed in-between cycles (even with tstat set to fan auto) is causing the problem. The air coming out feels wet, even smells sort of wet if that makes sense. I'm wondering, is it possible to adjust it to not run constantly? Are some fans just made to run constantly?
    Where do you live? My son lives in Allenton.
    Keep us posted.
    Regards Teddy Bear
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

  9. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by teddy bear View Post
    Where do you live? My son lives in Allenton.
    Keep us posted.
    Regards Teddy Bear
    Norristown. Bit of a drive. I have one more guy I'm gonna try, comes recommended by a neighbor. If that fails I'll let you know. Appreciate the offer though.

  10. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by htcrx8 View Post
    Norristown. Bit of a drive. I have one more guy I'm gonna try, comes recommended by a neighbor. If that fails I'll let you know. Appreciate the offer though.
    Sorry not a offer. I was visiting my son who was a friend of the factory manager.
    I am back in WI now.
    You find the right tech and we can get him up to speed.
    Regards Teddy Bear
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

  11. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by htcrx8 View Post

    The temp of the home is typically 72-74F, RH 60-65% during the day, 65-70% at night.
    It's raining today and its 72F/68%RH inside.

    How should I be measuring the supply?
    I stuck my humidity reader on the vent and gotten inconsistent results.

    The temp seems to take a while to adjust. One day I got 58F/58%RH, today (it's raining out) I got 64F/65% RH.
    Both cases, the temp seems to stay the same through out the cycle, and the RH creeps up slowly.

    The cycles seem a bit short, they typically don't run for longer than 10-12 minutes.
    On days where it's moderate out it will on average 7-8 minutes maybe 4 times an hour.
    WHILE YOU ARE pursuing a Root Cause, you should also change C.P.H. to 1 or 2.

    C.P.H. = Counts (Cycles) per Hour
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  12. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by teddy bear View Post
    Sorry not a offer. I was visiting my son who was a friend of the factory manager.
    I am back in WI now.
    You find the right tech and we can get him up to speed.
    Regards Teddy Bear
    Ah Ok I missed the first part of your reply that got mixed in with the quoted text haha.

    I think my issue with the last two guys was where they didn't make the connection between having the fan run constantly at a low speed being responsible for/exacerbating the humidity problem. Which is odd to me since it seems like common sense. Or more worrisome is that they knew it's a problem and tried to convince me it wasn't since they know the fan in my system can't be stopped from running constantly.


    Quote Originally Posted by dan sw fl View Post
    WHILE YOU ARE pursuing a Root Cause, you should also change C.P.H. to 1 or 2.

    C.P.H. = Counts (Cycles) per Hour
    I unfortunately can't set this setting on my thermostat. It seems very basic, cycles on/off at a 1 degree temperature difference (which also isn't adjustable).

  13. #26
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    Did some experimenting with the thermostat today while I give the guy a few days to return my call.

    It seems that turning the system completely off, which does stop the fan, and back on every so often, seems manage the humidity well. Can hear the condensate pump dumping a lot more water into the sump pump as well. I think the main issue is, the fan control on my thermostat does nothing, it behaves like fan 'on' is selected no matter which mode I selected between on, auto, and circ. I'm also discovering that turning the air on once an hour and letting it run for a relatively long time brings my humidity way down. So at this point I'm thinking my issue is the thermostat.

    My thermostat is the Honeywell VisionPRO TH8000 series. The manual has a section for the dehumidification feature, which is suppose to run the AC longer, up to 3F below the set temperature. However it appears to be disabled on mine. I've also read about some thermostats being able to run the fan on low with the AC on to act as a dehumidifier. Are these sort of functions dependent on my air handler system for compatibility? Or they should work on any variable speed system?

    I'm guessing something is wrong with the wiring if my fan control isn't working at all. Is wiring something that HVAC technicians typically do or they defer to electricians?

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