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  1. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by hvacskills View Post
    one of the difficulties I have is locating compressor / condensing unit data online, often times when I try to find data about a compressor / condensing unit that is obsolete I can only find the data for the current replacement compressor / condensing unit, imagine that is mainly my lack of ability to navigate the web or the manufacturers website properly ..... do you have saved individual compressor / condensing unit information that you reference or are you just proficient navigating the web ?

    I think I would like to start by understanding some of the compressors basic functions better, like compression ratios and discharge temperature ...... I think if I can have a better mechanical understanding of how a compressor functions then I can better expand that knowledge to different applications, once I hit that point then I could probably just bounce from one compressor data sheet to another to make comparisons and cross references like you suggested ....

    you had mentioned pictures as a tool for you to use to help better understand, me too, I also find a physical piece of paper with writing on it a preferred method over top of looking at a computer screen, seems to sink in better, plus you are not tethered to a computer screen so you can reference the material at anytime and the pages are easier to flip through .....
    When trying to get a better grasp of how everything works together in a system, I try to focus on each aspect until I understand what it does and why. It really comes down to understanding the basics first because those are your building blocks. Then when you start to take a wider look at a system you will spend a lot less time wandering around in the dark speculating or just guessing at what's going on. The basic laws of physics aren't that difficult to comprehend once you get the drift of where they came from and how they are applied to the basics.

    I suggest studying the first chapters of any good book on Refrigeration, like the one by Dick Wirtz...Commercial Refrigeration for the HVAC Tech. He writes from a tech level and point of view, unlike to others which are written by university professors who have never held a wrench in their hands. ...And just because you've been in the business for XX years, that's no reason no to read and learn the true basic fundamentals of why a system does what it does.

    https://books.google.com.ec/books?id...page&q&f=false

    I often have run into a brick wall when searching for some of the older information as much of it a has simply been deleted by the manufacturer. On the other hand, as you say, being more proficient on the internet helps tremendously, and that just comes with time and experience.

    I used to have a rather extensive collection of printed material, some dating back to the early 1950's. I mistakenly left some of it behind when I left my job in 1989 with a market chain, I lost a bunch of good stuff in a Florida hurricane in 2004 when the roof blew off half of my shop's building and I then had to abandon many manuals and binders of old manufacturer's equipment info when I closed up shop and packed off to Ecuador, simply because you only get so much space in a 20 ft shipping container.

    I have since had occasion when I missed that old stuff, but I find more often than not, I don't rely on paper-based info any more at all. I rarely use my printer or scanner either. Actually, the availability of information online has been growing rapidly overall, mostly with a lot better organized new information, but sometimes old data that I thought was gone forever gets re-published.

    So I try to maintain a decent amount of info in my computer files, especially the popular things like manufacturer catalogs for condensing units coils and compressors. Those do change with new revisions and the old ones go away, but as I mentioned, more and more, really handy stuff gets archived by the manufacturer and put up alonf with their current listings, so keep an eye out for those.

  2. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by TechmanTerry View Post
    RSES has some very good info on comps and cond units & refrigeration. Dick Wirz has some very good info on comps and cond units & refrigeration.
    thank you

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  4. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by icemeister View Post
    When trying to get a better grasp of how everything works together in a system, I try to focus on each aspect until I understand what it does and why. It really comes down to understanding the basics first because those are your building blocks. Then when you start to take a wider look at a system you will spend a lot less time wandering around in the dark speculating or just guessing at what's going on. The basic laws of physics aren't that difficult to comprehend once you get the drift of where they came from and how they are applied to the basics.

    I suggest studying the first chapters of any good book on Refrigeration, like the one by Dick Wirtz...Commercial Refrigeration for the HVAC Tech. He writes from a tech level and point of view, unlike to others which are written by university professors who have never held a wrench in their hands. ...And just because you've been in the business for XX years, that's no reason no to read and learn the true basic fundamentals of why a system does what it does.

    https://books.google.com.ec/books?id...page&q&f=false

    I often have run into a brick wall when searching for some of the older information as much of it a has simply been deleted by the manufacturer. On the other hand, as you say, being more proficient on the internet helps tremendously, and that just comes with time and experience.

    I used to have a rather extensive collection of printed material, some dating back to the early 1950's. I mistakenly left some of it behind when I left my job in 1989 with a market chain, I lost a bunch of good stuff in a Florida hurricane in 2004 when the roof blew off half of my shop's building and I then had to abandon many manuals and binders of old manufacturer's equipment info when I closed up shop and packed off to Ecuador, simply because you only get so much space in a 20 ft shipping container.

    I have since had occasion when I missed that old stuff, but I find more often than not, I don't rely on paper-based info any more at all. I rarely use my printer or scanner either. Actually, the availability of information online has been growing rapidly overall, mostly with a lot better organized new information, but sometimes old data that I thought was gone forever gets re-published.

    So I try to maintain a decent amount of info in my computer files, especially the popular things like manufacturer catalogs for condensing units coils and compressors. Those do change with new revisions and the old ones go away, but as I mentioned, more and more, really handy stuff gets archived by the manufacturer and put up alonf with their current listings, so keep an eye out for those.

    I will definitely read that book .... I also feel I need to better understand the compressor more thoroughly .... I should be able to do well regarding that considering I have rebuilt a few car and motorcycle engines ...

    imagine at times you have to contort yourself to explain things to me in a manner I will be able to comprehend, do not think that is not recognized or appreciated .... have to be honest, sometimes I have to read and re-read and re visit what you say before it sinks in which sometimes is several days later, same with Bbeerme, just cant absorb too much information at times, mostly just preoccupied running my small business or whatever else I have to deal with so it is not that I am not trying to comprehend and I am very much appreciative ..... but part of that reason also is I am trying to have a thorough understanding ....

    Ecuador ? ? ?

  5. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by icemeister View Post
    and I then had to abandon many manuals and binders of old manufacturer's equipment info when I closed up shop and packed off to Ecuador, simply because you only get so much space in a 20 ft shipping container.
    sorry I just caught that, Ecuador .... congratulations !

    so does that mean you can stand outside at noon twice a year and not cast a shadow ?

    seen something about the Egyptians or Greeks or somebody being able to calculate the Earths diameter to within around 10 % I believe by using the shadow cast by the sun ......

  6. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by hvacskills View Post
    sorry I just caught that, Ecuador .... congratulations !

    so does that mean you can stand outside at noon twice a year and not cast a shadow ?

    seen something about the Egyptians or Greeks or somebody being able to calculate the Earths diameter to within around 10 % I believe by using the shadow cast by the sun ......
    I'm only a couple of hundred miles south of the equator, so the sun rises and sets at approximately the same time every day, all year round...within 5 minutes or so. At noon every day the sun is directly overhead.

    As a result, we have no seasons in the traditional sense. Just a dry season from July through December, which here near the coast is a little cooler with highs of 80-85F with hardly any rain and the rest of the year is a wet season which is more hot and humid in the low 90's with some rain every day, usually at night, when the temps average around 70F.

    Up in the Sierra where the elevations are 8-9000 ft, the temperatures struggle to get above 70F and average about 45-50F at night.

    ...and that story about water going down the drain in the opposite direction is just a myth.

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  8. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by icemeister View Post
    I'm only a couple of hundred miles south of the equator, so the sun rises and sets at approximately the same time every day, all year round...within 5 minutes or so. At noon every day the sun is directly overhead.

    As a result, we have no seasons in the traditional sense. Just a dry season from July through December, which here near the coast is a little cooler with highs of 80-85F with hardly any rain and the rest of the year is a wet season which is more hot and humid in the low 90's with some rain every day, usually at night, when the temps average around 70F.

    Up in the Sierra where the elevations are 8-9000 ft, the temperatures struggle to get above 70F and average about 45-50F at night.

    ...and that story about water going down the drain in the opposite direction is just a myth.
    what about the milky way ? supposedly you get a better view in the southern hemisphere, I know you are not southern but closer than being northern ..... are there a lot of lights do you have a good view ? ..... probably see about maybe 20 stars at night here in Cleveland ..... think at times I would feel far more spiritually connected to the universe if I saw the full stars at night, really think seeing a lack of stars damaging in ways ....

  9. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by hvacskills View Post
    and what about the milky way ? supposedly you get a better view in the southern hemisphere .... are there a lot of lights do you have a good view ? ..... probably see about maybe 20 stars at night here in Cleveland ..... think at times I would feel far more spiritually connected to the universe if I saw the full stars at night, really think seeing a lack of stars is damaging in ways ....
    I'm about 10 miles outside a city of over 3 million people, so the light interference is significant. The industrial smog and the haze from the moderate humidity cuts down a lot on clear night views. I could clearly see Mars early last night but nothing at all around it. When I lived in Cuenca, a city of 500.000 at 8400 ft, the sky was much clearer when there were no clouds, which wasn't often.

    I had much better star gazing back in Florida.

  10. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by icemeister View Post
    I'm about 10 miles outside a city of over 3 million people, so the light interference is significant. The industrial smog and the haze from the moderate humidity cuts down a lot on clear night views. I could clearly see Mars early last night but nothing at all around it. When I lived in Cuenca, a city of 500.000 at 8400 ft, the sky was much clearer when there were no clouds, which wasn't often.

    I had much better star gazing back in Florida.
    could only imagine how humanbeings viewed themselves for millennia as far as their place in the universe not just over 120 years ago before lighting ..... had to look at everything in a completely different way ....

  11. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by icemeister View Post
    I'm about 10 miles outside a city of over 3 million people, so the light interference is significant. The industrial smog and the haze from the moderate humidity cuts down a lot on clear night views. I could clearly see Mars early last night but nothing at all around it. When I lived in Cuenca, a city of 500.000 at 8400 ft, the sky was much clearer when there were no clouds, which wasn't often.

    I had much better star gazing back in Florida.
    going to be interesting what the James Webb telescope sees ....

    oh, BTW .... The surface of the Earth at the equator is moving at 1670 km/hr.

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