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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    Post How Accurate is Your HVAC Field Testing?

    As many groups look to the future, decisions are being made based on their opinions that field personnel can test and diagnose HVAC systems.

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Louisburg Kansas
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    Most people look at taking field measurements the same way they do painting. Although anyone can paint it takes time and experience to actually qualify as a painter. The same is with field measurements except there is a lot more to it and it takes a lot more time to be good at it than most think. The first thing you have to learn is what measurements do you need and what instrument will give the results you need and how to use the instrument. It takes about 5 years to learn test and balance well enough to handle most situations encountered. Although the fan laws are great you have to learn the difference between the theoretical and reliance on actual measured values.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Iowa
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    971
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    Actually I believe as we look to the future, future techs and owners will want to synch their smart phone with the machine and the machine will tell them if it's good or bad and what they need to do to make it better. We will loose the skills for repair to truely understand what is being done. That being said there will be new skills needed to understand what the software is telling us. Some of the machine software almost do that now.

    I look at the automotive industry as my proof, look at cars and code readers. Just about every DIY'r and autoparts stores have the ability read the code and tell you what part you need probably with a 90% accuracy. But then you have the super-tools the OEM shops have when you just can't quite seem to fix the issue. I am a firm believer that part of the future is HVAC systems will become more Plug & Play. Installs will need lesser trained individuals and repairs will be become more within DIY'r capability. If the refrigerant is contained you don't need an EPA card to purchase the equipment

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    2
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    I agree, give the industry a little time and testing instrumentation readings will become codified and widely understood. It's just the path between here and there is going to be a little bumpy. I'm not confident early adoption is a well rewarded venture.

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