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  1. #1
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    Aug 2014
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    Trying to figure out how many watts our new AC uses

    Hello, we just got a Lennox 13ACXN030 2.5 ton 13 SEER AC unit. They talk about amperage and volts and all that but they don't tell what the wattage is. So I was curious if one of you could help me figure this out. I found this PDF if you can make heads or tails of it. https://www.lennoxpros.com/docs/Technical/210739.pdf

    P.S. Hopefully this isn't a junk AC unit I know a lot of people have their opinions but what's done is done and it's ours for the next 10 years LOL

  2. #2
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    Jan 2004
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    Around 2.5 KWs per 30,000 BTUs of cooling.
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    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  3. #3
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    Aug 2014
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by beenthere View Post
    Around 2.5 KWs per 30,000 BTUs of cooling.
    LOL I'm not sure what that means. Dumb it down for a newb.

  4. #4
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    Jan 2015
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    I can help. I actually installed a simular unit today that uses the same compressor. A 2.5 ton AC unit is going to pull about 7.5 amps. You mulipley this by the voltage (240) and you get 1800 watts.

    The next thing you should calculate is your blower in the furnace that's running the same time the AC condenser is running outside. If you have a standard furnace with a PSC motor that's going to pull about 5 amp. Again you multiply this by the voltage (120 for a furnace) and you get 600 watts.

    Thus if you add the two together your total wattage is 2400 for every hour of run time.

  5. Likes Kamakzie liked this post
  6. #5
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by James Colver View Post
    I can help. I actually installed a simular unit today that uses the same compressor. A 2.5 ton AC unit is going to pull about 7.5 amps. You mulipley this by the voltage (240) and you get 1800 watts.

    The next thing you should calculate is your blower in the furnace that's running the same time the AC condenser is running outside. If you have a standard furnace with a PSC motor that's going to pull about 5 amp. Again you multiply this by the voltage (120 for a furnace) and you get 600 watts.

    Thus if you add the two together your total wattage is 2400 for every hour of run time.
    Thanks I appreciate it.

  7. #6
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    Aug 2014
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    Thread Starter
    One way or another I think it's going to use a lot less energy than the old 18-year-old Amana used.

  8. #7
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    Why do you want to know, and what can you possibly do with the information?
    Uh...Google it yourself!

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by STEVEusaPA View Post
    Why do you want to know, and what can you possibly do with the information?
    Just was curious as to how much energy this thing sucked.

  10. #9
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    Jan 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kamakzie View Post
    One way or another I think it's going to use a lot less energy than the old 18-year-old Amana used.
    Well it would depend a lot on what kind of unit it was. Back 20 years ago you could get 8 seer units that would pull about 30 percent more. However you might have had a high seer unit that was comparable to what we use today. Is this new new physically bigger in size compared to your old unit.

    I pulled a 30 year old payne unit and replaced with with another 2.5 ton payne unit. The new one was twice as big.

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