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Thread: Well depth

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  1. #1
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    Well depth

    Hey guys, figured I'd post this here. What I want to do is monitor my 80' well for my house. As most of us know, 2.3' of head equals 1psi. If I drop down a piece of soft copper (maybe weighted), would I be able to semi-accurately be able to measure depth of water? Down to a few feet is fine, I just want to keep an eye on it during the summer months.
    I usually don't have much more than 60' of water so a 30# gague should be good and give me a decent resolution. I plan on putting a bulk head fitting in the casing and a 90 down. I know my joints need to be sealed well and probably need to remove it once in a while to make sure it's still accurate.
    Am I way out in left field? Those ultrasonic ones are quite pricey!

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  2. #2
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    It should work.

    What I would do: seal the cap. put a vacuum pump on it. keep the vacuum on auto start/stop between 12" and 15" to begin with. you can tweak it later and add fail-safes to prevent pump water ingestion. lowering the pressure inside the well casing makes the water want to be there. you can literally have water all the way up to the top of the casing doing this.

    (dont ask how many pumps Ive broken )

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    It should work.

    What I would do: seal the cap. put a vacuum pump on it. keep the vacuum on auto start/stop between 12" and 15" to begin with. you can tweak it later and add fail-safes to prevent pump water ingestion. lowering the pressure inside the well casing makes the water want to be there. you can literally have water all the way up to the top of the casing doing this.

    (dont ask how many pumps Ive broken )
    Would doing that run any risks of collapsing in part of the bore? Like what's above the water? There's a lot of shale where I am... With that comes iron.
    I got lucky though, my neighbor had a bad sulfur well. I only get a whiff when the barometric pressure changes rapidly or of the going water changes direction. That usually happens in spring and fall. It's not consistent though.

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  4. #4
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    Hmmmm . . . .

    Something doesn't seem right.

    Wouldn't there be a point where the vacuum would not be able to overcome the weight of the water?

    I'm guessing if you had a 300' well, at something like 20 gallons a minute, that vacuum pump would never see liquid water. Just vapor H20.


    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    It should work.

    What I would do: seal the cap. put a vacuum pump on it. keep the vacuum on auto start/stop between 12" and 15" to begin with. you can tweak it later and add fail-safes to prevent pump water ingestion. lowering the pressure inside the well casing makes the water want to be there. you can literally have water all the way up to the top of the casing doing this.

    (dont ask how many pumps Ive broken )
    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

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  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    Hmmmm . . . .

    Something doesn't seem right.

    Wouldn't there be a point where the vacuum would not be able to overcome the weight of the water?

    I'm guessing if you had a 300' well, at something like 20 gallons a minute, that vacuum pump would never see liquid water. Just vapor H20.
    That's true to some extent. it's generally 26 feet above the normal water line. In the area Ben and I are in, wells arent usually over 130 feet deep. The water table is high also.

    you're correct on the 300' well example. but it would still allow for an addition of a 26 foot column of water not there before.

    a perfect vacuum would allow for 33.9 feet of additional water. but we dont want that as we dont want too much boiling and we want to prevent pump water ingestion.

    edit - when you have NO water, the addition of 26 feet of standing water is a huge improvement on life

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  8. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    Hmmmm . . . .

    Something doesn't seem right.

    Wouldn't there be a point where the vacuum would not be able to overcome the weight of the water?

    I'm guessing if you had a 300' well, at something like 20 gallons a minute, that vacuum pump would never see liquid water. Just vapor H20.
    That is a Factor, but, the Well is open to the Water table/ Spring, & as the Column of water is lifted up, the Spring/ Water table increases the Volume of water, .... Kinda like a boiler fill valve, ... If I'm Thinkin' Clearly (And that's Questionable Eh?).

    Even in times of Drought, Earth quake, or heavy Construction that affected the Water Table, ...this set up, should be adjustable for Depth, & should work, as long as Demand, doesn't overcome the Supply.
    Hos 4:6 My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge. Because you have rejected knowledge, I will also reject you, that you may be no priest to me. Because you have forgotten your God’s law, I will also forget your children.


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  9. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    It should work.

    What I would do: seal the cap. put a vacuum pump on it. keep the vacuum on auto start/stop between 12" and 15" to begin with. you can tweak it later and add fail-safes to prevent pump water ingestion. lowering the pressure inside the well casing makes the water want to be there. you can literally have water all the way up to the top of the casing doing this.

    (dont ask how many pumps Ive broken )
    A Vacuum pump, as in HVAC/ Refrigeration Marc?

    And, ... You are pumping out the air in the Well Casing, which is causing the Water to rise?

    Interesting!
    Hos 4:6 My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge. Because you have rejected knowledge, I will also reject you, that you may be no priest to me. Because you have forgotten your God’s law, I will also forget your children.


    "You've got to Stand for Something or You'll fall for anything" (A. Tippin)


    Mat_15:24 But he answered, “I wasn’t sent to anyone but the lost sheep of the house of Israel.”

  10. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidDeBord View Post
    A Vacuum pump, as in HVAC/ Refrigeration Marc?

    And, ... You are pumping out the air in the Well Casing, which is causing the Water to rise?

    Interesting!
    It will work, but a piston pump lasts longer. There's no oil to contaminate.

    Yes, lowering pressure in the casing which makes air pressure force more water into the space.

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  12. #9
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    Nope. Did this on my dad's well. the shale starts 1 foot below grade. it's 96 feet deep, 10" iron casing with an aluminum cap. It works best with a submersible pump.

    Used CPVC pipe for the vacuum. It's all siliconed together. the case to pipe connection has a few washers and a large nut on the inside of the casing on the male cpvc adapter. We eventually built a PVC accumulator that the pump connected to. At the bottom of the vertical pipe were 2 electrodes that could short if the pipe ingested water. The pump then shut off.

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  14. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    Nope. Did this on my dad's well. the shale starts 1 foot below grade. it's 96 feet deep, 10" iron casing with an aluminum cap. It works best with a submersible pump.

    Used CPVC pipe for the vacuum. It's all siliconed together. the case to pipe connection has a few washers and a large nut on the inside of the casing on the male cpvc adapter. We eventually built a PVC accumulator that the pump connected to. At the bottom of the vertical pipe were 2 electrodes that could short if the pipe ingested water. The pump then shut off.
    Hos 4:6 My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge. Because you have rejected knowledge, I will also reject you, that you may be no priest to me. Because you have forgotten your God’s law, I will also forget your children.


    "You've got to Stand for Something or You'll fall for anything" (A. Tippin)


    Mat_15:24 But he answered, “I wasn’t sent to anyone but the lost sheep of the house of Israel.”

  15. #11
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    I always wanted to cut a heavy polycarbonate sight glass into the top of the lid but dad wouldnt let me. I thought it would be neat to watch the water boil, plus have a visual of water height.

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  17. #12
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    Are you saying that if I run out of water I could throw the jb on and suck water in (potentially depending on the table)?


    'The more you know, the more you realize you don't know'
    ...

  18. #13
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    Next time Im at dad's Ill get pics of the setup. we used a piston pump rather than a vaned/oiled pump. Like this Thomas pump:


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