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Thread: Well depth

  1. #1
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    Well depth

    Hey guys, figured I'd post this here. What I want to do is monitor my 80' well for my house. As most of us know, 2.3' of head equals 1psi. If I drop down a piece of soft copper (maybe weighted), would I be able to semi-accurately be able to measure depth of water? Down to a few feet is fine, I just want to keep an eye on it during the summer months.
    I usually don't have much more than 60' of water so a 30# gague should be good and give me a decent resolution. I plan on putting a bulk head fitting in the casing and a 90 down. I know my joints need to be sealed well and probably need to remove it once in a while to make sure it's still accurate.
    Am I way out in left field? Those ultrasonic ones are quite pricey!

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  2. #2
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    It should work.

    What I would do: seal the cap. put a vacuum pump on it. keep the vacuum on auto start/stop between 12" and 15" to begin with. you can tweak it later and add fail-safes to prevent pump water ingestion. lowering the pressure inside the well casing makes the water want to be there. you can literally have water all the way up to the top of the casing doing this.

    (dont ask how many pumps Ive broken )

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    It should work.

    What I would do: seal the cap. put a vacuum pump on it. keep the vacuum on auto start/stop between 12" and 15" to begin with. you can tweak it later and add fail-safes to prevent pump water ingestion. lowering the pressure inside the well casing makes the water want to be there. you can literally have water all the way up to the top of the casing doing this.

    (dont ask how many pumps Ive broken )
    Would doing that run any risks of collapsing in part of the bore? Like what's above the water? There's a lot of shale where I am... With that comes iron.
    I got lucky though, my neighbor had a bad sulfur well. I only get a whiff when the barometric pressure changes rapidly or of the going water changes direction. That usually happens in spring and fall. It's not consistent though.

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  4. #4
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    Nope. Did this on my dad's well. the shale starts 1 foot below grade. it's 96 feet deep, 10" iron casing with an aluminum cap. It works best with a submersible pump.

    Used CPVC pipe for the vacuum. It's all siliconed together. the case to pipe connection has a few washers and a large nut on the inside of the casing on the male cpvc adapter. We eventually built a PVC accumulator that the pump connected to. At the bottom of the vertical pipe were 2 electrodes that could short if the pipe ingested water. The pump then shut off.

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  6. #5
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    I always wanted to cut a heavy polycarbonate sight glass into the top of the lid but dad wouldnt let me. I thought it would be neat to watch the water boil, plus have a visual of water height.

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  8. #6
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    Are you saying that if I run out of water I could throw the jb on and suck water in (potentially depending on the table)?


    'The more you know, the more you realize you don't know'
    ...

  9. #7
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    I just may try that! If we have a bit of a dry spell and it works, I could possibly hook up a sump pump float with a relay to reverse the switching (normally closed contacts) to control it...

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  10. #8
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    yes. but atmospheric pressure pushes it in. you're just providing the incentive for water to be there.

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  12. #9
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    Next time Im at dad's Ill get pics of the setup. we used a piston pump rather than a vaned/oiled pump. Like this Thomas pump:


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  14. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    Next time Im at dad's Ill get pics of the setup. we used a piston pump rather than a vaned/oiled pump. Like this Thomas pump:

    Ooo, I can get my hands on some used chiller purge pumps. They are diaphragm style with reed valves like yours. It's a single stage though. Might take a while but it does pull down to 15"Hg

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  16. #11
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    you can find vacuum switches on ebay pretty readily too, if you want it automated.

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  18. #12
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    Hmmmm . . . .

    Something doesn't seem right.

    Wouldn't there be a point where the vacuum would not be able to overcome the weight of the water?

    I'm guessing if you had a 300' well, at something like 20 gallons a minute, that vacuum pump would never see liquid water. Just vapor H20.


    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    It should work.

    What I would do: seal the cap. put a vacuum pump on it. keep the vacuum on auto start/stop between 12" and 15" to begin with. you can tweak it later and add fail-safes to prevent pump water ingestion. lowering the pressure inside the well casing makes the water want to be there. you can literally have water all the way up to the top of the casing doing this.

    (dont ask how many pumps Ive broken )
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I use 56% silver on everything except steel.

    Did you really need the " If you were a real tech " ??

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  20. #13
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    Plus, at least in my area, the casing is just to keep out surface water. Doesn't go down very far. Can't remember what the code is.
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I use 56% silver on everything except steel.

    Did you really need the " If you were a real tech " ??

  21. Likes DavidDeBord liked this post
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