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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Prairieville, Louisiana
    Posts
    10
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    2300 volts are very common in Industrial plants along Mississippi river from New Orleans past Baton Rouge. it is because 2300 is common available voltage in that area. 4160 is rare is older parts of New Orleans. You fing 208 voltage chillers in older areas of NO.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Prairieville, Louisiana
    Posts
    10
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    208 volt chillers cause a problem with the wire sizes and contactors having to be so large compared to identical sized higher voltage chillers. Wire size being dictated by amperage, and such high amperage being required for low voltage chillers. I worked at numerous nuclear plants and many had 4160 volt chillers and a few had 6900 chillers. Reactor cooling pump motors were commonly 4160, and many had reactor cooling pumps powered by 14800 volts. These were commonly very high horsepower pumps, Many transmission lines are 500,000 volts to avoid loss over great distances. The primary difference is that in a chiller operating on higher voltage, moisture in the refrigerant side will very easily cause motor failure, and windings need to be form wound rather than random wound for increased reliability and longevity.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Prairieville, Louisiana
    Posts
    10
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    Many textile plants had Carrier 19EA, 4160 chillers back in the 70s. Stator failure was very common in random wound stators. Carrier had to go to form wound stators, and longer style rotors to cured the problem. Rotors with copper rather than aluminum rotor bars were also installed in some, along with some nuclear plants. Often, a motor burnout on a large chiller causes acidic condition and nasty sludge that may take years to clear up. Better to avoid motor failure in the first place.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Prairieville, Louisiana
    Posts
    10
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    I did not like Benshaw starters at all. Bad idea in an attempt to save money by mounting starter to chiller rather than separately. Starter was in the way of overhauling chiller in many installations, not to mention of dubious quality. People at Carrier still gripe about Benshaw starters.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Louisburg Kansas
    Posts
    1,547
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    Doing TAB work I didn't do very many facilities with 4160. When I did I made sure my contract excluded the electrical measurements. I knew just enough about high voltage to stay away from it. I may have been wrong but I'm still alive.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Northwest GA
    Posts
    610
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bglenn525 View Post
    I was having a conversation with a coworker the other day about 4160 volt chillers and why we dont see more of them. While i know there are a ton of them out there it seems like all the ones i work on are 460volt. I understand the cost of running a high voltage service into the building, and then the cost associated with hiring a qualified electrician to service the starter, but it seems like the long term savings far outweigh that cost. Is there a special added cost the energy provider hits them with for providing the high voltage line or something? It just seems like more buildings i work in should have a high voltage service.
    Really boils down to the building/plant infrastructure. Medium voltage switchgear, associated cabling and equipment is not cheap. Installation, maintenance and operation is also not cheap. Over the long haul though savings are good mainly due to the gain from not having transformer losses. The closer you can get to the end use of the supply voltage coming into the plant the more efficient. Not always possible or practical. But in large facilities you will see more of it. We have several sites that utilize 4160 and 2300 volts. They are all large industrial plants. One site has close to 32000 tons of chiller capacity. Another site has close to 8000 tons with several thousand horsepower of other motors running at 4160. But for most chiller plants it's just not practical to put the infrastructure in on the get go. I had the pleasure to help start up a 3500 ton chiller with a 13200 volt input VSD. Medium voltage work is no joke for sure. The training, safety and engineering that comes into play really protects you and the equipment. Sure you can be stupid and get injured or killed real quick with medium voltage work if you don't pay attention and really follow the rules. Many folks have. There is no room for error or lack of judgement or respect. In my mind though, 120 volts is just as dangerous. It ain't the voltage that gets ya, it's the current.
    Superheat, that must be REALLY hot.

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