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  1. #1
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    Most beneficial technical training?

    The primarily plumbing wholesale distributor I worked for nearly six years decided to eliminate the HVAC advisory position I held, so I am deciding what I want to be when I grow up. I seem to at that point in my life where my experience and diversity is giving potential employers the idea I may not be actively working for as many years as they may want someone to be for them. As far as I am concerned, I am just getting started with all of the great new technology in the HVAC industry. Also, I have 24 years left on my mortgage, so I have to keep working at least that long .

    In the meantime, I am updating my training programs to better suit newer technology. I have always focused my training programs on understanding why we do the things we do rather than just teaching "what" to do. When we understand why we do something, it makes it easier for us to be more diverse in how we do it. For instance; we leave duct insulation loose because it is the sealed air space that is the actual insulating factor and we seal the vapor barrier of insulation to keep moisture from taking away from the amount of air space between the ducting and the vapor barrier. If an installer or technician does not understand the why of insulation, they may tend to pull the insulation too tight to be effective in order to make it look nicer.

    What I also want to focus on is what I am going be referring to as "practical" training programs. It is good to know laws of physics, but we also should know what will work under practical instances when we are just not able to apply perfect condition applications to installations and repairs of HVAC systems.

    What are important things for the technicians on this forum to learn? Keep in mind that determining what we don't know is a difficult concept, but think outside of the box a bit and think of applications where you wish you knew a way around doing the job by the book without compromising the end result. Thanks in advance for your input.
    Training is important!
    Practical Training is a must!

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  3. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by RoBoTeq View Post

    What I also want to focus on is what I am going be referring to as "practical" training programs. It is good to know laws of physics, but we also should know what will work under practical instances when we are just not able to apply perfect condition applications to installations and repairs of HVAC systems.
    Doooodd... they're gonna call you a hack! Western NY residential is this every day. There are so many on here that cant understand unincorporated towns, no AHJs or anything not regulated. They cant understand doing only what the customer will pay for, even if it's unconventional.

    I'm ALL FOR what you want to do. Be prepared for the flame wars. I honestly think a lot of the guys here do that every day (do what the customer will pay for) rather than the stuff they say to everyone on the board (it has to be X, Y, Z to work or walk away!)

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  5. #3
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    Thread Starter
    I know that there will be the "perfectionist" types who will be making themselves feel good by tearing down things I teach that get the job done. I'm used to that. Fortunately, I am also used to hearing technicians who attend my classes tell me that they appreciate learning useful hacks to get them out of trouble when the proper test equipment or part aren't available at the moment. I have pretty thick skin when it comes to being told that everything I teach isn't what the textbooks "require". As a technical service advisor over the years, what I require is that the system does the job it was intended to do, even if it was a bit funky getting there. Thanks for the response.
    Training is important!
    Practical Training is a must!

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  7. #4
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    I think we'd get along quite well.

    I often have to think of "out of the box" or "err... different" solutions to get someone by or to get it done without having to raze the entire structure. It's life, it's often not perfect. Im not talking about "beer can cold", but things like "the head is higher, the suction lower, the air flow is bad due to the 50 yr old belt drive furnace, the condenser is in an alcove, but I have a 16 degree split an the customer is happy."

  8. #5
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    Exactly. What most people don't realize is that manufacturer's specs are based on unrealistic parameters under pristine conditions. There is no way people living in the humid Mid-Atlantic area are going to accept the indoor temps at 80 degrees when it's 95 degrees outside with 99.99% humidity.
    Training is important!
    Practical Training is a must!

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  10. #6
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    one of biggest gripes is the ashrae temperature design numbers. where i am we have microcosms in just about every town. look up buffalo,ny in may. you'll see something like 50-70 degrees and maybe 65% RH. For the last decade where ive been it's been 80-90+ with 85% RH. The last 2 days were 90+.

    People need to adjust their calculations to reflect the microcosm. Ashrae is an average of a major metropolitan area. Customers will be happier and the bottom dollar would be better. It is for me, anyway.

    but nooooo... "i'll be a hack if I stray from approved numbers!!"

    please...

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