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Thread: Pulled Pork

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    WA
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    Pulled Pork

    I smoked a pork collar today for the first time. It was a Berkshire pig from Snake River Farms. I cooked it at 200-250 degrees for 11 hours, to an internal temp of 203 degrees. It was really, really good.
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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
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    Southern California
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    Looks great! I've really started using a traeger for everything, and a few hours of smoke for pulled pork with that nice smoke ring is just right!

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
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    Victorville Ca
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    Here's my question/ then comment. When i was doing my research on smoking as I was building a large smoker for a interest I had for smoking and or opening up a BBQ place I came across this stumbling block. 1st how do you keep the coals at such a burn rate you don't get it too hot or too cold I mean 11 hours is a long time to adjust coals. 2ed is how do you not over smoke if using wood as your soul source of heat. I know when I watch competition BBQ it's all about the prefect piece of meat. seems hard to get those results .

    That looks really good . looks like you know your smoking I know doing this for personal use and for a restaurant is different , but I am still confused in some ways of all the different methods. I will do like 30 pork bone in shoulders at a time in our smoker . I decided it not working for me so I tore into the smoker put two burner assemblies from a old premier furnace with a pilot. I piped in a gas valve like you would se on a wall furnace controlled by a johnson control thermometer. Now I stock up the wood box and just leave it over night in front of our bbq place. When the wood runs down the propane kicks in and keeps me at or just below 230 degrees all night. Then i incounted another problem the smoke was not venting fast enough for me. I still felt we were getting a over smoked sour flavor . So went back out to our yard pulled a inducer motor off of a old furnace and wired it in . Now when it's working right the inducer fires up pulls the smoke across the meat and now I get a better flavor . Have you ever injected pork ?? If you go to www.itchyfootbbq.com or facebook or yelp for Victorville California you can see some picks of finished products of how we smoke. We do get a lot of positive feed back just don't think we are hitting on all cylerners. We should be busier . thats why I talk BBQ a lot and ask questions. something is missing with us

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    Thread Starter
    I just use my Weber 22” kettle. I use a device called a slow n sear, which holds the coals on one side and has a built in water pan. You light about 12 briquettes, put them in a corner, and fill the rest of the slow n sear with unlit coals and a few chunks of wood. Dial in the vents and it’ll maintain 225 degrees for about 10-12 hours.

    As to your questions, I’ve never used a stick burner, but from what I’ve read, the key is to have a small, hot fire. You don’t want a big, smoldering fire because the smoke won’t taste good. You want a clean burning fire for light, good tasting smoke. The wood needs to be dry, but not too dry.

    I’ve never injected pork shoulder, there’s so much fat that moisture isn’t a concern.

    Another thought I have is meat quality. Pork butts are pretty forgiving but for brisket, quality is really important.

    I learned a lot from amazingribs.com and from Aaron Franklin’s YouTube videos.

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