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Thread: My Story

  1. #1
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    My Story

    Hello everyone Iím new to this site but have a couple years of HVAC/R experience under my belt. I live in northwest Florida and have completed an HVAC training program a few years back. The school focused mostly on residential equipment. I Have my universal 608. Right out of school I got a job installing. I decided it wasnít for me after about a year and a half. I just wasnít making enough $ to support my family. I went back to cooking And started a side business maintaining and repairing the Restaurantís equipment. Most of my training was focused on residential so Iím still training, reading, and studying as much as possible to get all the refrigeration information I possibly can! I am currently reading Dick Wirz book Commercial Refrigeration. As of right now my goal is to obtain all the tools,(still need torch set, vacuum pump, recovery machine, scale, recovery tank, and a couple ladders.) while getting more field experience, learn learn learn, Get my contractors license and go full time with my company. Where I live itís a tourist town, nothing but restaurants and hotels.
    I need advise!

    1 Am I on the right track?

    2 What steps should I be taking to achieve my goals?

    3 What should I be doing differently?

    4 Can you recommend books and/or training materials?

    Canít wait to be able to access the educational part of this forum.
    Thanks everyone



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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  3. #2
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    Long term you will make more money in refrigeration than cooking. You need to work for an established contractor for five years before you will really know what’s going on. Good luck!

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  5. #3
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    Where I am, I think you need four or five years experience before you can get a contractors license. Among other requirements.
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I use 56% silver on everything except steel.

    Did you really need the " If you were a real tech " ??

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  7. #4
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    In NY there's no such thing as a contractor's license. I suggest you get with a small to medium size company that does the work that you want to do. You need experience and customer exposure before you go out on your own. Im not a fan of unions but many members here have had good experiences with them.

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  9. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scoobie View Post
    Long term you will make more money in refrigeration than cooking. You need to work for an established contractor for five years before you will really know whatís going on. Good luck!
    Right now I make around $20 an hour plus the repair/maintenance business side work. But thatís only 8 months out of the year. Winter time is slow I make $15 an hour and only get about 20 hours a week.
    Taking a $8 per hour pay cut to go to work for a company Iím just not sure how I could make ends meet. We know how to live below our means but the pay cut would mean living pay check to paycheck.
    I have thought about it a lot actually but I just canít come to a conclusion...

    How quickly is it possible to begin making $20+ per hour working for a company?


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  10. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    In NY there's no such thing as a contractor's license. I suggest you get with a small to medium size company that does the work that you want to do. You need experience and customer exposure before you go out on your own. Im not a fan of unions but many members here have had good experiences with them.
    You are totally right! I do need experience and customer exposure.


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  11. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by kalan850 View Post

    How quickly is it possible to begin making $20+ per hour working for a company?
    It's easy. Immediately. You have to market yourself and then live up to it.

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  13. #8
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    My Story

    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    It's easy. Immediately. You have to market yourself and then live up to it.
    In my area you get hired on at $12 and google says average salary for seasoned techs is around $40,000 per year.


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  14. #9
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    Kalan,

    Marc's advice in #4 is correct, ... You need the exposure, in all phases of the Business Sales, Service, Install, Advertisement etc.

    And, if You need a ladder for Your Van, ... You jus' might be able to use Marc's.
    Hos 4:6 My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge. Because you have rejected knowledge, I will also reject you, that you may be no priest to me. Because you have forgotten your Godís law, I will also forget your children.


    "You've got to Stand for Something or You'll fall for anything" (A. Tippin)


    Mat_15:24 But he answered, ďI wasnít sent to anyone but the lost sheep of the house of Israel.Ē

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  16. #10
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    Your area doesnt dictate your salary, you do. If you allow it to be 12, well, then that's on you. Market your strengths, boost your weaknesses by stressing your learning capability, promote your accomplishments to your past companies.

    My ladder doesnt get many miles. It's often stored because I hate weathered fiberglass.

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidDeBord View Post
    Kalan,

    Marc's advice in #4 is correct, ... You need the exposure, in all phases of the Business Sales, Service, Install, Advertisement etc.

    And, if You need a ladder for Your Van, ... You jus' might be able to use Marc's.

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  18. #11
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    In my area anyway, its tough to get in with someone if you don't do refer and cooking. And refer pays a hell of a lot more. One of my recently deceased friends did cooking and he use a 5% mark up and normally didn't charge shipping.

    We only do refer. Well, mostly. We do hot side for select clients, and afterhours it is even more select.

    Honestly, learn all you can. It never hurts. I have taken in multiple HVAC/R jobs where I really had no clue what the job required. But after I was hired and authorized to preform the job I sure as hell found out what was required and I did it. And on the next job I certainly did much better. It's a learning curve.

    Others may disagree, but I have found I cant learn everything on the chance I may use it someday.

    Oh yeah, on HVAC my local inspectors are awesome if I call them ahead of time with questions. They will even come out to the job site and tell me what they like to see done.

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  20. #12
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    This thread really needs to be moved. Like maybe to the General Forum (?).
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I use 56% silver on everything except steel.

    Did you really need the " If you were a real tech " ??

  21. Likes DavidDeBord liked this post
  22. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    Where I am, I think you need four or five years experience before you can get a contractors license. Among other requirements.
    In my county, it needs to be recent experience too.

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