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  1. #14
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    Feb 2017
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    I took the lock washers off and caught a couple threads. For what it is, I think it should be fine... for now.

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  2. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    Can you clean the existing bolts holes out Really well with a solvent like lacquer thinner? Pressuring the inside-area with slight nitrogen or air pressure will prevent anything getting inside the housing.

    Then clean and J/B weld new 1/4-20 studs into the existing holes. After they are set in the epoxy use the attached item in place over them to make sure the alignment is correct. Just spray silicone the attached-housing holes so nothing sticks to it. Let the silicone dry for an hour or so beforehand. 24 hours hours later put nuts onto the studs and torque them to specs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BennyD View Post
    Hey guys, looking for some ideas.
    I've got a 40HP Taco condenser pump that has stripped threads for the rear cover. The motor sits vertical so the owner wants it repaired. It looks like the 2 bolts (1/4-20) were loose and just wore out the aluminum.
    Here's the killer, they are not blind holes and go into the bearing cavity. I'd like to go to a 8mm 1.25 pitch so I shouldn't have to drill. I'm worried about getting material into the bearing cavity. I'll use grease on the tap and clear it often.
    I was also thinking about filling the cavity full of grease and pump some more in pushing whatever is in it back through the holes.
    The cover itself will be easy to open up for the larger bolt.
    Any other ideas? I really don't want to diassemble the motor to do this...

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  3. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    East Side
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    That’s kinda why I was thinking too, just epoxy studs in the holes. Simple fix.

  4. #17
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    Feb 2017
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    New York
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    Thread Starter
    I'll be back there tomorrow to finish up some other things. I'll definitely mention the studs to him, especially now I know I have at least a couple threads to work with.
    There isn't any grease up in the holes yet, I'll swab them out with some degreaser and a rag first.
    Thanks!

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  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    New Jersey
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    If the splash guard is large enough to utilize the four bolts that hold the end bell. You could use rod coupling nuts on top of existing bolts and then use short bolts to go through the splash guard into the rod nuts.

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  6. #19
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    Feb 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by chander View Post
    If the splash guard is large enough to utilize the four bolts that hold the end bell. You could use rod coupling nuts on top of existing bolts and then use short bolts to go through the splash guard into the rod nuts.

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    It's close, too bad it curves down right at that point. Would work but look like dog crap.

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  7. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    up in the hizzy
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    Very likely there is an axial preloader in the other side of the holes, try to keep the stud flush with the inside so they wont interfere with the pre-loader movement.
    There is not better place for the working men than the union! 100% UA the only HVAC union!

  8. #21
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    Feb 2017
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    New York
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    Quote Originally Posted by valdelocc View Post
    Very likely there is an axial preloader in the other side of the holes, try to keep the stud flush with the inside so they wont interfere with the pre-loader movement.
    That is a little to the outside of the holes. I was able to see the bearing cage through the holes... well until I greased it. Don't think anyone ever properly greased it before. Nowhere near the amount of grease I expected after 2-3 years of run time.
    Edit: Let me clarify, 2-3 years, 3 pumps. 2 at a time run, rotate weekly. This building has free cooling in the winter, so the system is used 24/7/365.
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  9. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    The Hot South
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    Why don’t you just replace the bearing cover?
    The 2nd most important amendment is to protect the 1st....

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  10. #23
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    Feb 2017
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    New York
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    Couple reasons:
    1) I'd rather fix it.
    2) I can fix it.
    I just can't see spending that kind of money on such a small issue.
    Quote Originally Posted by R123 View Post
    Why don’t you just replace the bearing cover?
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  11. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Clearwater, Florida
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    Quote Originally Posted by BennyD View Post
    Couple reasons:
    1) I'd rather fix it.
    2) I can fix it.
    I just can't see spending that kind of money on such a small issue.

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    https://www.kieslermachine.com/weld-...inum-weld-nut/

    Slap one of these in there (looks like its aluminum) and just tack weld it in with a TIG welder or a MIG welder, done deal, good as new.

  12. #25
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    Feb 2017
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    New York
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    I'd have to pull the rear bearing assy. Those are 1/2" thick. I don't have that much real estate. It would have to be machined down after it was welded in.

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  13. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Chicago area
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    How about some all thread couplings, and JB weld them next to the bearing housing. Drill some new holes for the bolts and use fender washers so as to cover over the original holes?


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