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  1. #1
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    Apr 2018
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    Maryland 21122
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    Heat Pump in Maryland

    Hello and thanks in advance for any assistance!

    I live near the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland, zip 21122.

    Two years ago I purchased a Pioneer mini-split unit heat pump for a (2) room 600 s/f area above my garage. This unit has performed great even heating and cooling this room without issue with outside ambient temps in the low teens in winter and low 100's in summer.

    For the past 5 years I have been heating my home with (2) pellet stoves and cooling my home with a standard A/C unit and air handler. This has been working fine except for having to hump 5 tons of pellets into the house every year .

    I have decided since the heat pump for the garage has worked so well, that I will purchase a unit for the house. Not a mini-split unit but a conventional split system.

    My home is a small 60yr old 1,100 s/f 2 story cape cod. Its cinder block construction with above average low-E casement windows and newer doors.

    I have not had someone do any calcs on the house yet but given all the info provide I wanted to ask the question....

    Would a conventional electric split system heat pump work for my home as well as the garage? I cannot understand why it would not but I just wanted to hear from others who know better.

    I have done some homework and it seems like a 2 ton unit would be the right size based on the size of the house and insulation factor. That is also the size of the A/C unit that currently cools the house in the summer.

    Existing duct work is in good shape and the right size to handle a 2 ton 800cfm air handler, possibly a tad over sized.

    I just want a basic unit without a bunch of bells and whistles. I am looking at the following set:

    Rheem
    15.5 seer Outside unit - p/n RP1524BJ1NA
    Air Handler - p/n RH1V2417STANJA w/10kw aux heat strip


    Any feedback is welcome and appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Jimmie

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
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    In the low teens, the heat pump will run non stop and the backup heat will cycle on & off. That's a nice HP system you are mentioning.

  3. Likes gable74 liked this post
  4. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
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    Maryland 21122
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by BaldLoonie View Post
    In the low teens, the heat pump will run non stop and the backup heat will cycle on & off. That's a nice HP system you are mentioning.
    Thanks for the quick reply @Baldloonie

    As long as the unit can keep up with temps mentioned I am okay with the cycling of the aux heat. Oddly, the mini-split unit in the garage has no aux heat and does fine.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Athens, Ohio
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    Ductless systems perform better than conventional systems at cold temperatures.

    I advise against running ducts to the garage as it is a huge carbon monoxide risk. As well as a code violation.

    Does your homework include a true load calculation? Not something based solely on square footage of the house. There is a link in my sig to a free load calculator.
    AOP Rules: Rules For Equipment Owners.

    Free online load calculator: http://www.loadcalc.net/


    There = not here. Their = possessive pronoun. They're = they are
    It's = contraction of it is. Its = the possessive form of it
    Too = also. To = expressing motion. Two = 2
    Then = after that, next. Than = indicates a comparison.
    Questions should end with a question mark "?" Statements end with a period "."

  6. #5
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    Apr 2018
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    Maryland 21122
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by kdean1 View Post
    Ductless systems perform better than conventional systems at cold temperatures.

    I advise against running ducts to the garage as it is a huge carbon monoxide risk. As well as a code violation.

    Does your homework include a true load calculation? Not something based solely on square footage of the house. There is a link in my sig to a free load calculator.
    I don't quite understand your response @kdean1

    The unit in the garage is a ductless mini split heat pump that has been running great for a few years now.

    The unit I highlighted above that I am considering for the house is a conventional split system heat pump.

    The garage is about 200' away from the house so they would not have anything to do with each other.

    I don't think there should be any CO2 involved in either system I hope

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Athens, Ohio
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    Quote Originally Posted by gable74 View Post
    Would a conventional electric split system heat pump work for my home as well as the garage? I cannot understand why it would not but I just wanted to hear from others who know better.
    There is some ambiguity in the way this question is worded. I understood it as a split system for the home AND the garage.

    CO2 won't hurt you. CO will.
    AOP Rules: Rules For Equipment Owners.

    Free online load calculator: http://www.loadcalc.net/


    There = not here. Their = possessive pronoun. They're = they are
    It's = contraction of it is. Its = the possessive form of it
    Too = also. To = expressing motion. Two = 2
    Then = after that, next. Than = indicates a comparison.
    Questions should end with a question mark "?" Statements end with a period "."

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
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    Maryland 21122
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    Thread Starter
    Sorry for the unclear questions but thank you for the help!

    If anyone has any other advice or suggestions before I pull the trigger please let me know.

    Thanks!

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
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    Maryland 21122
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    Thread Starter
    ....And I just wanted to make sure coming from a group who does this for a living that the model referenced above was a quality unit with decent feedback.

    You can try to google reviews but there are so many variables that go into good or bad reviews its tough to weed out the "REAL" issues with different brands.

    I have a local company of whom I know the owner so I am sure I will get a quality install. Actually, I will be installing most of it myself except for the brazing in and evacuation of the line set.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Mount Holly, NC
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    To get closer to minisplit performance, you should investigate inverter drive heat pumps.

    True variable units are quite pricy, but they make some inverter drive units with 5 stages instead of variable.

    Far better Heating capabilities.

    Large mini splits are also available with a ducted blower instead of al wall cassette...
    The TRUE highest cost system is the system not installed properly...

    Find a HVAC-Talk Contractor by clicking here

    Do you go to a boat repairman with a sinking boat, and tell him to put in a bigger motor when he tells you to fix the holes?

    I am yourmrfixit

  11. #10
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    Apr 2018
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    Maryland 21122
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    Thread Starter
    Another quick question. The supply plenum is going to be MUCH smaller than the supply plenum on the old furnace. I may end up hanging this air handler horizontal as well to make things easier to install. I do not have take-offs on the plenum, everything is a long horizontal run with feeders coming off the main trunk as it runs down the house. Is it a big deal to not have much of a supply plenum? It will almost exit the air handler right into the main trunk if I hang it horizontal. I attached a crude drawing to show what I mean.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
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    Dover, DE
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    I’d pull out the plenum and flex duct and run metal all the way to the existing duct.
    What size is that flex?
    I havent failed. Ive just found 10,000 ways that wont work. - Thomas Edison

    Its not whether you get knocked down, its whether you get up. - Vince Lombardi

    "In this house we obey the laws of thermodynamics" - Homer Simpson

  13. #12
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    Apr 2018
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    Thread Starter
    Flex would be 14" and only be about 10" long and would act like a vibration dampner. The length is a little exaggerated in the picture.

    I need that plenum/duct to transition from the air handlers output 10" x 16" to the 16" x 16" main trunk.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
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    Dover, DE
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    Why is your installation contractor not figuring all this out?
    14” flex is too small.
    I havent failed. Ive just found 10,000 ways that wont work. - Thomas Edison

    Its not whether you get knocked down, its whether you get up. - Vince Lombardi

    "In this house we obey the laws of thermodynamics" - Homer Simpson

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