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  1. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by fridg View Post
    You get to know which ones to give a wide-berth over time.
    ALL of them!

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  3. #28
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    Guess what Boys, who? what? RSES has a SAM titled "PRINCIPLES AND CHARACTERISTICS OF (B)BEER(me) DISPENSING" ,dated from way back.

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  5. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by TechmanTerry View Post
    Guess what Boys, who? what? RSES has a SAM titled "PRINCIPLES AND CHARACTERISTICS OF (B)BEER(me) DISPENSING" ,dated from way back.
    I'll tell you what...from hickville... not too much foam, not too little pressure... no beer tap cock blasting good maintenance.

    To carbonate a liquid "bigly" you need cold temps, movement, and better than 2.5 volumes per beer.

  6. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    I'll tell you what...from hickville... not too much foam, not too little pressure... no beer tap cock blasting good maintenance.

    To carbonate a liquid "bigly" you need cold temps, movement, and better than 2.5 volumes per beer.
    I like the "mandatory taste testing" part. LOL.

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  8. #31
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    hear hear! *urp*

  9. #32
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    I used to run a brewery so I have some info on this.

    Asahi from what I know is pasteurized so keeping it warm wont matter.

    If the faucets are flow control then high psi is normal. We always had ours set between 25-35 psi and then it was controlled at the faucet.


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  10. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joshiggity View Post
    I used to run a brewery so I have some info on this.

    Asahi from what I know is pasteurized so keeping it warm wont matter.

    If the faucets are flow control then high psi is normal. We always had ours set between 25-35 psi and then it was controlled at the faucet.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Good info.

    You are correct. It can be controlled at the Faucet(Lowered).

    Thanks.
    The primary function of the design engineer is to make things difficult for the fabricator and impossible for the serviceman.

  11. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joshiggity View Post

    Asahi from what I know is pasteurized so keeping it warm won’t matter.
    No need to refrigerate your milk then. Let me know how that works for you.

  12. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    No need to refrigerate your milk then. Let me know how that works for you.
    I dont agree with it but its why Budweiser can stay on the shelf for years and not go bad. And craft beer needs to stay cold or else you get the secondary fermentation issues


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  13. #36
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    From what I remember, by "over pressurizing" the keg w/ CO2 , the ""atmosphere" of the keg becomes "overpowering" w/CO2. Then the "higher/extra CO2" in the atmosphere of the keg goes into the beer which is at a naturally lower(proper) CO2 level. Then once the beer has "extra" CO2 in it ,it is awful damn hard to control the foaming at the tower. But then, what do I know, I'm a Yukon on Rocks kinda guy.

  14. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joshiggity View Post
    I don’t agree with it but it’s why Budweiser can stay on the shelf for years and not go bad. And craft beer needs to stay cold or else you get the secondary fermentation issues


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    I had Budweiser in a 1/2 keg at 32 degrees. After 2 weeks the alcohol content rose to 23% and the distributor took it back. It was hard core beer, very not tasty.

    You're misinformed. Pasteurizing only kills a percentage of bacteria and other harmful life, to ensure a lifespan of a product over a given period of time. If it was 100% it would be sterilization and you wouldnt need to refrigerate products that currently "perish". You can find all the details in the wiki article but here's a snippet to support my discussion:



    Pasteurization or pasteurisation[1] is a process that kills microbes (mainly bacteria) in food and drink, such as milk, juice, canned food, and others.
    It was invented by French scientist Louis Pasteur during the nineteenth century. In 1864 Pasteur discovered that heating beer and wine was enough to kill most of the bacteria that caused spoilage, preventing these beverages from turning sour. The process achieves this by eliminating pathogenic microbes and lowering microbial numbers to prolong the quality of the beverage. Today, pasteurization is used widely in the dairy industry and other food processing industries to achieve food preservation and food safety.[2]
    Unlike sterilization, pasteurization is not intended to kill all microorganisms in the food. Instead, it aims to reduce the number of viable pathogens so they are unlikely to cause disease (assuming the pasteurized product is stored as indicated and is consumed before its expiration date). Commercial-scale sterilization of food is not common because it adversely affects the taste and quality of the product. Certain foods, such as dairy products, may be superheated to ensure pathogenic microbes are destroyed.[3]

  15. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by TechmanTerry View Post
    From what I remember, by "over pressurizing" the keg w/ CO2 , the ""atmosphere" of the keg becomes "overpowering" w/CO2. Then the "higher/extra CO2" in the atmosphere of the keg goes into the beer which is at a naturally lower(proper) CO2 level. Then once the beer has "extra" CO2 in it ,it is awful damn hard to control the foaming at the tower. But then, what do I know, I'm a Yukon on Rocks kinda guy.
    You're correct. As soon as the pressure falls off, the foam blows out. The beer then falls back to "normal" carbonation levels. By that time, most of it is all over the serving area, glass, and server's uniform.

  16. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    I had Budweiser in a 1/2 keg at 32 degrees. After 2 weeks the alcohol content rose to 23% and the distributor took it back. It was hard core beer, very not tasty.

    You're misinformed. Pasteurizing only kills a percentage of bacteria and other harmful life, to ensure a lifespan of a product over a given period of time. If it was 100% it would be sterilization and you wouldnt need to refrigerate products that currently "perish". You can find all the details in the wiki article but here's a snippet to support my discussion:
    Thats impossible unless the water evaporated out of your keg leaving the alcohol behind therefore increasing the content. Which is also very unlikely since kegs are well sealed. Room temperature macro beer,Ike Bud, which has gone through filtration, centrifuge and pasteurization will last for at least 6 months but for sure way longer.


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