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  1. #1
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    Feb 2016
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    Louisburg Kansas
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    Need a Fan Curve

    I have to test a fan but can't find a fan curve. I haven't seen the fan and only know what I've been told. The fan is centrifugal type is 12 inch and operates at 2100 RPM, draws 9 horsepower and delivers 3200 CFM. I don't know the specific fan type or static pressure. Can anyone tell me the fan type and design static pressure?

  2. #2
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    Aug 2016
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    San Diego
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    Yea you're going to have to get a model and serial number of the unit or the fan model number. No way I can think of with what's provided as the blade design and pitch it self is also a factor. Though I could be wrong.

  3. #3
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    Aug 2013
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    Visalia California 93291
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    9 HP and 3200 CFM does not seem right, the the Make and Model if you can

  4. #4
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    Thread Starter
    There is no tag on the unit. I'm thinking given the fan speed, size and horsepower that it is a blower. I'm guessing the static is 10 to 12 inches. I hate to test it without getting some idea of what it is and should be. I can't find a fan curve that comes close to the info I've been given.

  5. #5
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    Aug 2013
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    Visalia California 93291
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    Quote Originally Posted by WAYNE3298 View Post
    There is no tag on the unit. I'm thinking given the fan speed, size and horsepower that it is a blower. I'm guessing the static is 10 to 12 inches. I hate to test it without getting some idea of what it is and should be. I can't find a fan curve that comes close to the info I've been given.
    it's not going to be 10-12 inches of static, your ducts would explode snap a picture of the unit --high static fans would be backwards incline

  6. #6
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    Feb 2016
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    Thread Starter
    The fan doesn't have duct just an outlet nozzle. By calculation the static would be 18 inches. Air horsepower calculations are not reliable because the fan type thus efficiency isn't taken into account but it did confirm my thinking that the static is higher than an hvac fan. I'm thinking the efficiency isn't better than about 60%. I don't know what the fan is for. All I know is they want it tested. It is a small company and I think they took a fan they had laying around and are using it for something they dreamed up.

  7. #7
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    Aug 2013
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    Visalia California 93291
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    Quote Originally Posted by WAYNE3298 View Post
    The fan doesn't have duct just an outlet nozzle. By calculation the static would be 18 inches. Air horsepower calculations are not reliable because the fan type thus efficiency isn't taken into account but it did confirm my thinking that the static is higher than an hvac fan. I'm thinking the efficiency isn't better than about 60%. I don't know what the fan is for. All I know is they want it tested. It is a small company and I think they took a fan they had laying around and are using it for something they dreamed up.
    My bad, this is not on an HVAC unit

  8. #8
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    Aug 2016
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    San Diego
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    Is it an exhaust fan?

  9. #9
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    Feb 2016
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    Louisburg Kansas
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    Thread Starter
    It is a supply fan.

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