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  1. #1
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    Time delay timers explained.

    So I drew a few symbols in my picture. I am familiar with a lot of electrical symbols and how they open in different situations like a temp activated or pressure activated. Etc. but I can not grasp the terminology of time delays. The basic 2 wire time delay on make is simple when the power makes it to the delay timer your timer starts counting then changes state. Or a delay on break timer will start counting once it lost its input signal power. So if it times out then power comes back to the timer it will change state instantly. I think I answered my own questions partly below but it’s still blurry. I think mainly because the electrical symbols are interchanged with terminology between manufactures. So in my picture #1-4 are time delay symbols. The description I found on line. Can someone explain how the switch has that description. For example #1 “ on normally open” so this switch is normally open. Once the input signal is applied then it closes? How do I know if it’s a delay on make or delay on break kind of timer? Example #2 is a “on normally closed” So does the “on” part mean it is a delay ON/make (on = make)

    Example #3 is an “off normally open” so does the off mean it’s a delay on break? (Off= break)??
    Examples # 5 and 6 have the same terminal layout but the actual number pattern are rearranged. Examples #1&2 are on with the stick figures leg symbol.
    Examples 3&4 have an arrow pointing down and are off delay. So with the “downward arrow” that will tell a technician it’s an off timer???

    But why in example 6 they state it’s an off timer but they use the stick leg figured symbol?? This confuses me.
    I really appreciate if someone can shed some light please. Thank you
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  2. #2
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    Mar 2018
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    Delay on Make or Delay on Break is indicated by the direction of the arrow, or so I learned 20+ years ago in electronics/electrical fundamentals. Your example #1 & 2 the arrow is pointing towards the "arm", thereby indicating a Delay on Make. Examples #3 & 4 the arrow points away from the "arm", thereby indicating a Delay on Break. NO/NC - no change. I found a pretty decent reference at allaboutcircuits dot com (unable to include a link, yet) and search for "time delay relays, that has time line examples of the different types.

    I can see some of your frustration with examples #5 & 6. I've often wondered when looking at diagrams of whether or not after the timer times out whether (example #5) 2 to 1 opens & done, or does it change to 2 to 3, when the way the switch is drawn in a fashion that I would expect it to move "up", and electrically open whatever is downstream of terminals 1 & 3.

    Good thing we have standards for things like this - there's so many to choose from

  3. #3
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    Sep 2010
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by dolson View Post
    Delay on Make or Delay on Break is indicated by the direction of the arrow, or so I learned 20+ years ago in electronics/electrical fundamentals. Your example #1 & 2 the arrow is pointing towards the "arm", thereby indicating a Delay on Make. Examples #3 & 4 the arrow points away from the "arm", thereby indicating a Delay on Break. NO/NC - no change. I found a pretty decent reference at allaboutcircuits dot com (unable to include a link, yet) and search for "time delay relays, that has time line examples of the different types.


    I can see some of your frustration with examples #5 & 6. I've often wondered when looking at diagrams of whether or not after the timer times out whether (example #5) 2 to 1 opens & done, or does it change to 2 to 3, when the way the switch is drawn in a fashion that I would expect it to move "up", and electrically open whatever is downstream of terminals 1 & 3.

    Good thing we have standards for things like this - there's so many to choose from
    Sorry for the late reply. The explanation about the contacts move in the direction of the arrow seems to hold true. I also have been reading information from the website all about circuits.com they break it down pretty basic. I appreciate your input. Now I have it down pretty good on the different symbols and when the delay comes into play along with the terminology.

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