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  1. #1
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    Good or best air monitor

    I'm thinking of getting a monitor to test air quality in people's homes. Lennox had such a device for use by its reps.
    What is a good or best, reasonable priced monitor I can leave in people's home for 24hrs? Price range $400-800
    We're awl pawthetic and kweepy and can't get giwrls. That's why we fight wobots.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by chaard View Post
    I'm thinking of getting a monitor to test air quality in people's homes. Lennox had such a device for use by its reps.
    What is a good or best, reasonable priced monitor I can leave in people's home for 24hrs? Price range $400-800
    For particulate pollution, the Dylos meter is untouched for price and accuracy.
    http://www.dylosproducts.com/ornodcp...8aAqL6EALw_wcB
    I use the pro version that measures down to .5 micron.

    For VOCs I have no faith in the rash of low cost consumer meters version that have recently been released.

    Only options that I consider trustworthy for VOCs are:
    1. Gas Chromatography/ Mass Spectrometry lab test. Home Air check will provide kits that you can take a sample, return and get fairly accurate results in 1 week. Cost about 130 - 210 per room. https://homeaircheck.com/products/
    A similar offer is available from Fike Analytical Technologies, L.L.C. Maybe a little more expensive but very accurate. - www.fikeanalytical.com
    Both companies have options for individual VOC break down and concentrations. :

    2. Industrial Grade PID meters - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photoionization_detector.
    These devices only indicate TVOC levels (total VOC levels). Individual gas breakdown is not available.
    Also these are not near as accurate as GC/MS, but are invaluable for a general indication. Also these are very useful for before after tests when doing remediation.
    I've used, via a rental company, the ppbRAE 3000. http://www.raesystems.com/products/ppbrae-3000. Rental cost via Pine Environmental is ~ 130.00 for the weekend.
    If you want to buy a meter they are expensive 7-8K. There are less expensive model available, but I don't know how accurate they are.
    Again I don't trust the consumer grade versions under $500. In fact I haven't seen any PID meter below 3500 that I would trust. I wish I could find one.

    As far as CO and CO2 meters - I don't know.

    As regards acceptable VOC levels:
    No federal or state agency has specified a specific limit for Total Volatile Organic Compounds (TVOCs)
    in indoor air; however, several members of the European Union and the U. S. Green Building Council
    (USGBC) have recommended 500 ng/L as the limit. Note that if all of the TVOC is the result only one
    or a small number of components, a hazardous condition may still exist.
    In homes, usually, TVOC levels below 200 ng/L indicate that the Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) is "Ideal,"
    TVOC levels between 200 and 300 ng/L indicate that the IAQ is "Good," TVOC levels between 300 and
    400 ng/L indicate that the IAQ is "Acceptable," and TVOC levels between 400 and 500 ng/L indicate
    that the IAQ is "Marginal." TVOC levels above 500 ng/L indicate that a problem may exist and it
    should be addressed.
    In commercial buildings, TVOC levels below 200 ng/L indicate that the IAQ is "Ideal," TVOC levels
    between 200 and 350 ng/L indicate that the IAQ is "Good," TVOC levels between 350 and 500 ng/L
    indicate that the IAQ is "Acceptable," and TVOC levels between 500 and 700 ng/L indicate that the IAQ
    is "Marginal." TVOC levels above 700 ng/L indicate that a problem may exist and it should be
    addressed.
    In production and manufacturing facilities, TVOC levels below 500 ng/L indicate that the IAQ is
    "Ideal," TVOC levels between 500 and 700 ng/L indicate that the IAQ is "Good," TVOC levels between
    700 and 1,000 ng/L indicate that the IAQ is "Acceptable," and TVOC levels between 1,000 and 1,500
    ng/L indicate that the IAQ is "Marginal." TVOC levels above 1500 ng/L indicate that a problem may
    exist and it should be addressed.

  3. #3
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    Thread Starter
    Thank you

  4. #4
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    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
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    How do you do comprehensive indoor air quality test? Indoor pollutants are very small concentrations. Many of the pollutants are expensive to detect. CO2/O2 is dependent on the number of occupants in the home.
    After all of the meters etc., I feel that the most important point is consistant filtered fresh air change when occupied. Most suggest a fresh change in 4-5 hours. When the wind blows or winter stack is high, most homes have excess natural air change. During calm, mild weather without mechanical exhaust, the natural air change rate decline to an air change in +12 hours. This is when pollutant concentrations rise and oxygen falls.

    Monitoring the amount of moisture in the home is even more critical because to indoor pollutants because growing mold/dust mites/bacteria produce many indoor pollutants that will make sensitive occupants ill and uncomfortable. ASHRAE suggest maintaining +40-<60%RH to control these biologicals and provide comfort.
    Coming into a home for a quick look at these issues is chancy at best.
    For me, it takes long term monitoring for a solid picture of indoor air quality. Of course, during the strong winter weather, or calm wet weather %RH is easy to check.
    Even if a home test well at the moment, during extremes, mold and other biologicals will accumulate.
    Most modern home need a minimal filtered fresh make-up air mechanical fan/control. If in a climate that the outdoor dew point goes below 30^F for months, a good humidifier is need for comfort at least. If the home is located in short term "green grass climate", a small whole house dehumidifier combined with a simple well set up a/c, will maintain <50%RH. This will avoid any mold/dust mite/baterial growth in the a/c ducts and home surfaces during the damp time of the year.
    Over the last 20 years, I have had some fantastic testing equipment, big bucks and impressive logging/testing results. Broke, fell off the car roof, lost, or setting in the closet, I am down to simple CO2, %RH, ^F dew point (inside/outside) data logging.
    Any concerned home occupant can have this <200 dollars. There are several, I us a lot of Netatmo for several years now. There are others.
    Really, a fresh, filtered air change (4 hours) when occupied, avoid wet spots, dry out the a/c for several hours everyday, maintain 40-55%RH and your customer will praise you for freshness and comfort.
    You can spend a lot of money muiltispeed ac/ERV/HRV/hepa filter/humidifier/dehumidifier.
    Or get a simple solid mid-moderate SEER a/c, a quality whole house dehumidifier+fresh air controller, and humidifier for cold weather climate with same results.
    As most of you know, Ultra-Aire whole house system is the old timer, high efficiency leader in this industry, and my favorite.
    An old man's view.
    Regards Teddy Bear
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
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    Austin
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    Here's one source I forgot to mention. http://www.airadviceforhomes.com/

    I can't vouch for their hardware first hand but I have spoken to them and was impressed. The use the ppbRAE 3000 to calibrate their VOC function.
    In addition I believe they measure all relevant other parameters - particulates, CO2, CO.
    I suspect cost is not low, but I don't know.

    I'd be interested in what you come up with.

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