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  1. #14
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    I think he was concerned that the TIG setup our company bought him wasn’t sufficient enough. He thought the seam was going to warp. I do basic “hobby” welding and very little of it so I deferred to him. I don’t pretend to know much about welding at all.


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  2. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by VanMan812 View Post
    I think he was concerned that the TIG setup our company bought him wasn’t sufficient enough. He thought the seam was going to warp. I do basic “hobby” welding and very little of it so I deferred to him. I don’t pretend to know much about welding at all.


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    Lol, well. If you run into it again, welding sheet will cause it to warp, but that's what hammers are for. I've had to weld some interesting things and I've heard it done a thousand different ways and I've tried it a couple different ways but i'll tell you what I think works the best.

    No matter the seam, no matter how long it is, no matter how thin the metal is, it can be welded, I guarantee it.

    So here's the thing, from the picture you showed me, it looks like a long bolted flange seam where the ends meet on the outside, so there's 2 way to go about this, weld it from inside the machine to prevent any food from getting into the groove (much harder to do, and who cares if there's food in that groove, when they clean it, they will get it out) or weld it from the outside.

    I would bolt it all together, make sure the seam and the flat spots are clean (look pretty clean in the picture). Only looking at the picture I would say I could do it in 1 hour or 2, looks like the sheets meet and you just start in one end and run the weld in 6" strips every foot or so, and when you reach the end, go back and weld what's left in the same style, leave the bolts in, they can do all the holding, the ends start to warp, beat them back so they are a tight seam and just fuse the weld, don't even use filler. The sheet even looks semi thick (for sheet) like a 1/16 or 1/8" thick.

    You do the 6" stiches so it doesen't get too hot, TIG it with 50 or 60 amps, use a pedal or some sort of amp control throughout the weld, plenty of argon, won't even have discoloration or cotton candy on the inside of the machine, it'll be a beautiful thing. ANY TIG machine will do 50 or 60 amps DC, if it can't do that, it's not a welder.

    You do loose the advantage of being able to disassemble it, you would have to cut the weld in the future but at least it would never, ever, ever, leak again and you could always weld it back together, matter of fact, if you fuse the end you could grind the weld in/off and you would have an open seam again.

    This type of weld is gravy welding, just a straight line, fit's like it's no ones business and it's stainless, could get that seam to be a rainbow of color.

  3. #16
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    How would welding the seam affect the ability to make future repairs of other parts?
    It's an upside down world we live in.

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  5. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Olivero View Post
    Lol, well. If you run into it again, welding sheet will cause it to warp, but that's what hammers are for. I've had to weld some interesting things and I've heard it done a thousand different ways and I've tried it a couple different ways but i'll tell you what I think works the best.

    No matter the seam, no matter how long it is, no matter how thin the metal is, it can be welded, I guarantee it.

    So here's the thing, from the picture you showed me, it looks like a long bolted flange seam where the ends meet on the outside, so there's 2 way to go about this, weld it from inside the machine to prevent any food from getting into the groove (much harder to do, and who cares if there's food in that groove, when they clean it, they will get it out) or weld it from the outside.

    I would bolt it all together, make sure the seam and the flat spots are clean (look pretty clean in the picture). Only looking at the picture I would say I could do it in 1 hour or 2, looks like the sheets meet and you just start in one end and run the weld in 6" strips every foot or so, and when you reach the end, go back and weld what's left in the same style, leave the bolts in, they can do all the holding, the ends start to warp, beat them back so they are a tight seam and just fuse the weld, don't even use filler. The sheet even looks semi thick (for sheet) like a 1/16 or 1/8" thick.

    You do the 6" stiches so it doesen't get too hot, TIG it with 50 or 60 amps, use a pedal or some sort of amp control throughout the weld, plenty of argon, won't even have discoloration or cotton candy on the inside of the machine, it'll be a beautiful thing. ANY TIG machine will do 50 or 60 amps DC, if it can't do that, it's not a welder.

    You do loose the advantage of being able to disassemble it, you would have to cut the weld in the future but at least it would never, ever, ever, leak again and you could always weld it back together, matter of fact, if you fuse the end you could grind the weld in/off and you would have an open seam again.

    This type of weld is gravy welding, just a straight line, fit's like it's no ones business and it's stainless, could get that seam to be a rainbow of color.
    Lol well when you put it like that maybe I actually could have done it! Thanks for the lesson


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  6. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by VanMan812 View Post
    Lol well when you put it like that maybe I actually could have done it! Thanks for the lesson


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    No problem.

    I think you have my email, if you run into these types of things in the future, feel free to shoot me an email, I am happy to help, or PM me here.

    A lot of this stuff is really simple, I used to be scared off a bit when I started out but figured the worst that could happen was that I wrecked it, in which case I would just have to figure out how to fix it.

  7. #19
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    I am by no means a TIG welding expert, but couldn't you temporarily clamp some chunks of metal near the repair area to act as a heat sink to try and prevent warping to begin with???
    Quote Originally Posted by Olivero View Post
    Lol, well. If you run into it again, welding sheet will cause it to warp, but that's what hammers are for. I've had to weld some interesting things and I've heard it done a thousand different ways and I've tried it a couple different ways but i'll tell you what I think works the best.

    No matter the seam, no matter how long it is, no matter how thin the metal is, it can be welded, I guarantee it.

    So here's the thing, from the picture you showed me, it looks like a long bolted flange seam where the ends meet on the outside, so there's 2 way to go about this, weld it from inside the machine to prevent any food from getting into the groove (much harder to do, and who cares if there's food in that groove, when they clean it, they will get it out) or weld it from the outside.

    I would bolt it all together, make sure the seam and the flat spots are clean (look pretty clean in the picture). Only looking at the picture I would say I could do it in 1 hour or 2, looks like the sheets meet and you just start in one end and run the weld in 6" strips every foot or so, and when you reach the end, go back and weld what's left in the same style, leave the bolts in, they can do all the holding, the ends start to warp, beat them back so they are a tight seam and just fuse the weld, don't even use filler. The sheet even looks semi thick (for sheet) like a 1/16 or 1/8" thick.

    You do the 6" stiches so it doesen't get too hot, TIG it with 50 or 60 amps, use a pedal or some sort of amp control throughout the weld, plenty of argon, won't even have discoloration or cotton candy on the inside of the machine, it'll be a beautiful thing. ANY TIG machine will do 50 or 60 amps DC, if it can't do that, it's not a welder.

    You do loose the advantage of being able to disassemble it, you would have to cut the weld in the future but at least it would never, ever, ever, leak again and you could always weld it back together, matter of fact, if you fuse the end you could grind the weld in/off and you would have an open seam again.

    This type of weld is gravy welding, just a straight line, fit's like it's no ones business and it's stainless, could get that seam to be a rainbow of color.
    Sent from my SM-N910W8 using Tapatalk

  8. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by BALloyd View Post
    I am by no means a TIG welding expert, but couldn't you temporarily clamp some chunks of metal near the repair area to act as a heat sink to try and prevent warping to begin with???

    Sent from my SM-N910W8 using Tapatalk
    You could try to do that yeah, but I can tell you from experience, if you keep going and going on a line like this, multiple feet long, it will warp like a mofo.

    I did a floor in a walk in fridge, seam was 8' long aluminum diamond plate, I did the above and it took me hours to do it, but I went a bit too fast, got a bit too trigger happy and the floor started warping, 3/16" plate.

    I've warped 1/2" thick steel from running on it too long.

    Heatsink is great and all, but I only use it for smaller welds or where it's close to something sensitive to heat, for long welds, tack it like it's no ones bussiness, every 6" inches or so throughout the whole thing, just tack it. Then make sure the flange is tight and I mean TIGHT, no daylight showing through, connect the tacks with 6" welds, jump ahead a foot or more, connect the dots.

    Feel the metal, is the whole thing getting burning hot? If so, take a break, get some air and come back when it's cool and continue.

    I can go on for so long about these things, hopefully I Answered your question.

  9. #21
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  10. #22
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