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  1. #1
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    Best retrofit refrigerant for R22??

    Hey guys now that we are nearing the end of R22 I have a question for all of you, which refrigerant do ya'll recommend to use instead of R22? I've heard 427A is the closest match as far as pressures and temperatures to R22. I have also heard some people us 422B and M099. I am also wondering if there are affordable leak detectors for these refrigerants yet. I did a 427A retrofit for the first time last week and am hoping it works out well for the customer. Had to change the filter driers as that is what the supply house recommended per manufacturer instructions.

    Any thoughts?? Please speak from experience with these refrigerants not just opinion.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    Woodbridge, VA
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    Also says to change out all of the valve cores and in some cases, the txv's. Make sure YOU read it all carefully rather than having someone tell you what they ready.

  3. #3
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    Jul 2011
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    Thread Starter
    TXV not necessary with 427A as stated by manufacturer but yes they do say they recommend to replace and rubber seals

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
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    Retrofit

    Quote Originally Posted by hvacsolutions View Post
    Hey guys now that we are nearing the end of R22 I have a question for all of you, which refrigerant do ya'll recommend to use instead of R22? I've heard 427A is the closest match as far as pressures and temperatures to R22. I have also heard some people us 422B and M099. I am also wondering if there are affordable leak detectors for these refrigerants yet. I did a 427A retrofit for the first time last week and am hoping it works out well for the customer. Had to change the filter driers as that is what the supply house recommended per manufacturer instructions.

    Any thoughts?? Please speak from experience with these refrigerants not just opinion.
    I have seen 407C to be the best

  5. Likes ga-hvac-tech, lions_lair liked this post
  6. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
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    Marlton, NJ
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    I've been using R422b. (NU22) The best thing about r422b is that it is compatible with any oil. The pressures are very close to R22 but obviously you should use the P/T chart that is printed on the box the tank comes in. It seems in my area everyone is using R422b. I know it's not advised but I've actually dropped it in on top of a system low on refrigerant that had R22 in it and it worked totally fine.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
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    Rhode Island
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    Depends on Age of System and which Oil it Has for retrofit.And I like the Prowler Leak Detector. You Get What You Pay For!

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Southold, NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cessnan1315efw View Post
    I've been using R422b. (NU22) The best thing about r422b is that it is compatible with any oil. The pressures are very close to R22 but obviously you should use the P/T chart that is printed on the box the tank comes in. It seems in my area everyone is using R422b. I know it's not advised but I've actually dropped it in on top of a system low on refrigerant that had R22 in it and it worked totally fine.
    Thanks for contaminating the entire system! If there was a way of turning your a$$ in I would.

    Now some poor smuck will have a mixed recovery cylinder!

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  10. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by pecmsg View Post
    Thanks for contaminating the entire system! If there was a way of turning your a$$ in I would.

    Now some poor smuck will have a mixed recovery cylinder!
    He's not worried about that he only thinks of himself.

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  12. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
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    Kansas Flatlands
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cessnan1315efw View Post
    I've been using R422b. (NU22) The best thing about r422b is that it is compatible with any oil. The pressures are very close to R22 but obviously you should use the P/T chart that is printed on the box the tank comes in. It seems in my area everyone is using R422b. I know it's not advised but I've actually dropped it in on top of a system low on refrigerant that had R22 in it and it worked totally fine.
    Not advised because it is violation of the EPA guidelines. At least you're honest of what you talk about. I have heard of this being done, buying time until a unit could be changed. I would mark the unit for mixed charge so later you don't contaminate the rest of a recovery cylinder to be turned in.

    Last summer we changed several compressors, Copeland ZR models that now come with POE oil, and used 407C. As said before it worked out great. Suction pressures run a little lower than R22. A couple units seemed to run a little higher head pressure. I have not used any drop-ins for fear of capacity loss at higher temps. I will also continue to use only R22 until we can't anymore. Nothing is as good as the real stuff in my opinion.

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  14. #10
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    Jul 2014
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    Richmond, VA
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    After lurking here as a member for nearly 4 years with a pitiful post count, I guess I might as well step in it and get some posts and probably some folks scratching their heads at my post. BTW, I am a dinosaur (over 55).

    If we are discussing resi work, we are talking reasonable quantities of R22 for a dry system, say 5-9 lbs. Not sure why anyone would retrofit a resi system and not just use R22. R22 is an exceptional refrigerant and still really isn't THAT expensive. It's not like these alternative refrigerants are free. I know pricing is not allowed on the site, but let's say the alternate refrigerant costs 10 apples per pound. Right now R22 costs about 25 apples per pound where I live. That's 15 apples per pound more than the alternative refrigerant. Let's say we have a system that holds 6 pounds. Are you really going through the trouble and potential small efficiency reduction in retrofitting over 90 apples? By the time the system dies in X years with the R22 fill, the HO can replace with a new system based on future refrigerant standards. Never retrofitted a system and never will.

    If you are talking hundreds of pounds in a commercial setting, that's an entirely different story.

    There are three refrigerants in my van: R22, R410a, and R134a. When the R22 is gone, I will retire.

  15. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    Panama City, Florida
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJEnterprises View Post
    After lurking here as a member for nearly 4 years with a pitiful post count, I guess I might as well step in it and get some posts and probably some folks scratching their heads at my post. BTW, I am a dinosaur (over 55).

    If we are discussing resi work, we are talking reasonable quantities of R22 for a dry system, say 5-9 lbs. Not sure why anyone would retrofit a resi system and not just use R22. R22 is an exceptional refrigerant and still really isn't THAT expensive. It's not like these alternative refrigerants are free. I know pricing is not allowed on the site, but let's say the alternate refrigerant costs 10 apples per pound. Right now R22 costs about 25 apples per pound where I live. That's 15 apples per pound more than the alternative refrigerant. Let's say we have a system that holds 6 pounds. Are you really going through the trouble and potential small efficiency reduction in retrofitting over 90 apples? By the time the system dies in X years with the R22 fill, the HO can replace with a new system based on future refrigerant standards. Never retrofitted a system and never will.

    If you are talking hundreds of pounds in a commercial setting, that's an entirely different story.

    There are three refrigerants in my van: R22, R410a, and R134a. When the R22 is gone, I will retire.
    I think you forget to include Mark up so you will need to double the number of apples, to a customer that might be a lot of apples.

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  17. #12
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    Sep 2015
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    Marlton, NJ
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    Quote Originally Posted by pecmsg View Post
    Thanks for contaminating the entire system! If there was a way of turning your a$$ in I would.

    Now some poor smuck will have a mixed recovery cylinder!
    I think your being a little extreme with this. Obviously I know this is not good practice and should be avoided at all costs... I was just merely trying to give some input on what will work and what I have expiramented with in a pinch.

  18. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
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    NRV, Virginia
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    I think we all know what happens to most mixed recovery cylinders
    "Call a technician for God's sake. Or we'll see you on the news or the Dark Side of the Moon."

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