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  1. #1
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    Automotive AC Block Diagram

    In the diagram below, the yellow line is the gas line--right? Is this also the "suction" line?

    The blue line is liquid?

    What is the purpose of the drier? Thanks, if anyone cares to respond.

    No one is useless in this world who lightens the burdens of another. -- Charles Dickens

  2. #2
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    From the compressor to the condensor is hot gas, then from condensor through the drier, expansion valve to evaporator is the liquid line and back to the compressir is the suction line. Counterclockwise from the compressor


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  3. #3
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    You got it.

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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by exreo View Post
    In the diagram below, the yellow line is the gas line--right? Is this also the "suction" line?

    The blue line is liquid?

    What is the purpose of the drier? Thanks, if anyone cares to respond.

    The drier is to absorb any moisture that might be in the circuit from poor installing and what might get added from manifold hoses if someone added refrigerant without releasing a small amount of refrigerant at the manifold to push out air before adding refrigerant. What is called di minis


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  6. #5
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    Thread Starter
    Thank you.
    No one is useless in this world who lightens the burdens of another. -- Charles Dickens

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  8. #6
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    That's a Chrysler system. The expansion valve is an H block.

    The circuit flow is correct as described.

    The top of the dryer has a very small sight glass. The dryer is called a "receiver-dryer."
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  10. #7
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    Are these systems to be weight in? Is recovering, charging, evacuating all the same as a residential system? I'm thinking mine has a leak. Oil and some yellowish greenish tint on some hoses. Thinking someone put dye in?

  11. #8
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    You do weigh in, to the Oz, and yes, that's dye.
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    2 Tim 3:16-17

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  12. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by timebuilder View Post
    You do weigh in, to the Oz, and yes, that's dye.
    Timebuilder, you know these automotive systems.

    I have a question.

    At what rpm do you charge a system, I know weighing in can be done with the motor off but is it at idle that you diagnose?

    The reasoning is how automotive AC does not blow as cold at idle as it does at normal speed. Speed 35mph and up


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  13. #10
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    If a system is working as intended, the biggest impact on duct temp is heat rejection. Most systems are diagnosed at idle, and that means that mechanical fan systems have low condenser airflow, and even electric fan systems, which are the standard now in most cars, can be overwhelmed.

    In the shop, I used two methods to overcome this: first, a large fan, if no one else was using it. On a really hot day, that fan was being used to cool the shop, so it wasn't always available. So, I would take a hose and spray water on the condenser. With the heat of the shop, I had a good load on the compressor and could watch the operation. During driving, there is more than enough air through the condenser as you cruise down the road.

    MVAC is it's own animal, because of controls and the mixing box that combines air from the evap and the heater core. There are two main system designs: CCOT, cycling clutch orifice tube systems with accumulators, and expansion valve/receiver systems. The biggest leak point is the compressor front seal in most systems.
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  14. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by timebuilder View Post
    If a system is working as intended, the biggest impact on duct temp is heat rejection. Most systems are diagnosed at idle, and that means that mechanical fan systems have low condenser airflow, and even electric fan systems, which are the standard now in most cars, can be overwhelmed.

    In the shop, I used two methods to overcome this: first, a large fan, if no one else was using it. On a really hot day, that fan was being used to cool the shop, so it wasn't always avail;ble. So, I would take a hose and spray water on thee condenser. With the heat of the shop, I had a good load on the compressor and could watch the operation. During driving, there is more than enough air through the condenser as you cruise down the road.

    MVAC is it's own animal, because of controls and the mixing box that combines air from the evap and the heater core. There are two main system designs: CCOT, cycling clutch orifice systems with accumulators, and expansion valve/receiver systems. The biggest leak point is the compressor front seal in most systems.
    Ok, never considered the electric fan used in todays cars. I was stuck in the 70'-80's when the radiator fan turned all the time and put some air over the condensor


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  15. #12
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    Even so, that fan is really a supplement to cruse airflow.

    And...those mechanical fans often has defective fan clutches, and airflow could be pretty bad in many cases. A big shop fan was a big help.
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  17. #13
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    Timebuilder, do you happen to know if these hoses/lines are a common leak or is there a seal of some sort at the connection? Was thinking about just replacing the entire line or lines?




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