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  1. #27
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    Next I am going to try using a high pressure washer to cut the clay, a sump pump to remove the washer water, and then just shovel out the heavy stuff.

    This all started with the idea of 'getting the water sooner' - with a 5-6' sump pump pit instead of a more typical 18" pit. But after I discovered that a deep-enough hole is self-draining and requires no pump I became intrigued with a simple maintenance free drainage system.

    PHM
    -------




    Quote Originally Posted by HVACRmom View Post
    Oh no Wayne3298 I meant no disrespect at all, I actually really liked your idea! You just sounded like you know what your doing so I thought maybe you were MacGuyver in disguise on the HT forum haha it was a joke you were supposed to laugh

    I'm actually very interested in how PHM digs the hole.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  2. #28
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    Jan 2001
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    Spoon shovel..... you can get em with handles up to about 12 feet or so.....

    http://www.oshkoshtools.com/products/spoons/spoons.htm

    These are also known as telegraph pole shovels......
    The bible is my constitution and the constitution is my bible.

    WE THE PEOPLE refers to THEM and not YOU.

    Chewbacca Mom 2016

  3. #29
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    Yes; well why doesn't the existing deep pit drain the front of My property as well as the back? <g>

    Obviously I don't know - but I picture that the basement floor sits lengthwise on a ridge of clay running in the same direction - so the front and the back are hydraulically separate. What else Can it be? Water drains from my rear neighbors a hundred feet away - their life-long wet sump pits are now dusty-dry - but not from the front of my basement 30 feet away? <g>

    I did give some thought to digging outside in the front of the house but that exposes me to public scrutiny - something I typically avoid - and there are large trees out front which I would prefer not to disturb. Plus; I would need a Big hoe to dig down that far - couldn't use a Bobcat - and there isn't really sufficienct room for that. I would be cautious about digging a hole below the footing in close to them and digging far enough away really isn't possible: trees, sidewalks, etc.

    Speaking of digging: in Florida about a month ago I hand dug a 7' hole - about 3' by 4' - in about an hour and a half. To bury a home-made grey-water tank. But Florida Sand is NOT New Jersey Clay ! <g>

    I did take some pics if you want to see them. <g>


    PHM
    --------




    Quote Originally Posted by knave View Post
    If one hole clears the whole neighborhood why not go just outside the house where you have plenty of room and stick a large vertical drain tile down? Would be farther to dig but easier to deal with dirt.
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  4. #30
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    mom,
    I didn't take your comment as disrespect. I actually liked it and just thought you were having fun. Nothing wrong with that.

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  6. #31
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    I liked the idea of digging outside but you need a method of locating the water trail. Then what happens if the trail changes it's path.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    At one time - about a year or so ago - I did build a toothed jetting water-well drilling rig. Although just using street water pressure - which is about 55 lbs. - and not a high pressure pump. But it wouldn't cut very well. For the sand it's fine but the clay pretty much stops it dead. The clay really doesn't 'dissolve' or break into small pieces.
    Add compressed air to that rig.

  8. #33
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    Talking about all this reminds me of a funny story.

    One time I go downstairs and find water on the floor - it had been a rainy spring and here is my old nemesis: Basement Water. So I find the deepest spot - which is between the gas water heater and the rear wall of the basement. I shop vac up a lot of the water but it's coming in pretty fast. As I have already done in other areas of the basement I drill a series of holes and then saw-cut out the concrete - working through the water. There is no room; I am wedged in behind the HWH, kneeling in an inch of icy cold water, my shoulder leaning on a cold damp wall, digging with a garden spade and a coffee can, and just screaming-mad the whole time. It takes me hours to accomplish and by the time I'm done I'm soaked to the bone, freezing cold, boots full of cold water, covered with nasty orange mud, my hair is full of sand and mud, and I am dead-dog beat tired. It was a Miserable friggin job.

    I am so drag-ass tired that, rather than pipe in a pump right then, I just hook a garden hose onto a sump pump and toss it into the hole. I run the hose out through the Bilco doors, and hang the far end in a bush - so I can see the water coming out. Pump on, muddy water pours out, and I head for a shower and a large brandy.

    I can see the hose from my bedroom window and continue to note with satisfaction that water is often coming out of it. In the basement the floor in that area is still wet but not pooling as it all runs into the new sump pit.

    I sometimes park my truck on that end of the property and when I do I also note the water coming out of the hose. So then eventually the spring rains stop and the summer heat starts to set in but the water continues to pump out. One hot early summer day I roll into that driveway and just then the pump starts. I think: WTH? It hasn't rained for Weeks! Where the hell is all this water coming from?

    So I go down and start to poke around with a flashlight. In about two minutes I discover that . . . . . the hot water heater is leaking! There never Was a rain-water issue. <g>

    That how dumb I am: my water heater goes bad so I dig a sump pump pit next to it to get rid of all the water! <g>
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

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  10. #34
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    Jan 2010
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    I like this idea. If one can cut surgically cut chunks ice off an evaporator with a pump sprayer, I would think this might work the same way.
    Quote Originally Posted by joeysmith View Post
    How about some kind of home built venturie (sp?) To suck the muck out with water and pushed outside through a hose. Maybe an electric pressure washer to jet the muck into a slurry.

    Sent from my SM-N910W8 using Tapatalk

  11. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    Talking about all this reminds me of a funny story.

    One time I go downstairs and find water on the floor - it had been a rainy spring and here is my old nemesis: Basement Water. So I find the deepest spot - which is between the gas water heater and the rear wall of the basement. I shop vac up a lot of the water but it's coming in pretty fast. As I have already done in other areas of the basement I drill a series of holes and then saw-cut out the concrete - working through the water. There is no room; I am wedged in behind the HWH, kneeling in an inch of icy cold water, my shoulder leaning on a cold damp wall, digging with a garden spade and a coffee can, and just screaming-mad the whole time. It takes me hours to accomplish and by the time I'm done I'm soaked to the bone, freezing cold, boots full of cold water, covered with nasty orange mud, my hair is full of sand and mud, and I am dead-dog beat tired. It was a Miserable friggin job.

    I am so drag-ass tired that, rather than pipe in a pump right then, I just hook a garden hose onto a sump pump and toss it into the hole. I run the hose out through the Bilco doors, and hang the far end in a bush - so I can see the water coming out. Pump on, muddy water pours out, and I head for a shower and a large brandy.

    I can see the hose from my bedroom window and continue to note with satisfaction that water is often coming out of it. In the basement the floor in that area is still wet but not pooling as it all runs into the new sump pit.

    I sometimes park my truck on that end of the property and when I do I also note the water coming out of the hose. So then eventually the spring rains stop and the summer heat starts to set in but the water continues to pump out. One hot early summer day I roll into that driveway and just then the pump starts. I think: WTH? It hasn't rained for Weeks! Where the hell is all this water coming from?

    So I go down and start to poke around with a flashlight. In about two minutes I discover that . . . . . the hot water heater is leaking! There never Was a rain-water issue. <g>

    That how dumb I am: my water heater goes bad so I dig a sump pump pit next to it to get rid of all the water! <g>
    Lol

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  13. #36
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    My brother wanted to plant a garden but the soil on my property is mostly clay. A radio guy here that can grow grass in your pocket said a product called Earthrite would turn that clay into tillable soil. My brother tried it and it worked. The soil was so bad I originally turned it over for him with the backhoe. If you can use it in this application the pressure washer trick will work a lot better.

  14. #37
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    What if you concentrate on getting a small diameter hole down through, as deep as needed.
    Same principle as thawing a freezer drain, get to the drain so the water can flow out.
    Like someone said, pointed steel rods, paddle bit with 6' extension, etc etc

  15. #38
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    That is what I originally did - and how I re-discovered that the drains-out-the-bottom theory works with this hole too. And at first this hole did drain out through the little 5-6" diameter bottom hole. But some crap later washed down into that narrow hole and then the long funnel shaped pit would fill with water again. So I left a pump - actually hanging on a rope - down in the pit to keep the water down. When all the oil spilled on my boat and I had to prevent myself going to EPA Prison I was more interested in getting that situation handled than I was in the front deep-pit pumped out so I left the pump not pumping as I stole the pump-to-garden hose fitting. That was last year some time and I've been working in FL since January. Apparently during my longish absence the front hole was less intimidated / started getting cocky, and then set about filling itself in.

    Now it needs to be beaten into submission but I'm still looking to make it as easy as possible on myself. <g>

    PHM
    -------



    Quote Originally Posted by knave View Post
    What if you concentrate on getting a small diameter hole down through, as deep as needed.
    Same principle as thawing a freezer drain, get to the drain so the water can flow out.
    Like someone said, pointed steel rods, paddle bit with 6' extension, etc etc
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  16. #39
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    Jun 2012
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    Always makes me wonder why we dig a hole in the ground to live in...

    Give me pilings in the south, or a frost protected (and radiantly heated) concrete slab in the north!

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