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  1. #92
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
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    Billington Heights, NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snaple4 View Post
    One more thing. I have about 90' worth for the French drain. How do I figure out how big of a perforated pipe I need? Supply houses here have only 3&4" I don't want to lay a 4" 90' long pipe and find it won't keep up.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
    4" will be fine. it'll handle everything up to a small flood

  2. #93
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    NW Arkansas
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    1,056
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by WAYNE3298 View Post
    What is going to be connected to the French drain?
    Nothing. I will daylight the French drain away from the house. The two gutters on the front will be run with solid PVC and daylighted near the French drain .

    I was thinking 4" but two of the contractors that gave me bids suggested 6". I do not even know where to buy 6"...

    I was also recommend to use Black jack premium for water proofing the exterior wall with 30lbs felt. Has a 50 year warrenty and won't crack like drylok if the slab moves. Anyone have any experience?

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

  3. #94
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Houston, Tx
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    142
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    there is a product made by carslile coatings co. that i would reccomend... no clue what it costs, but its what we spec'd for a 2nd story pool vault in this wonderful post tensioned podium slab.

    its called carslile ccw-500R and it consists of a primer first, then hot applied layer second, then a reinforcing fabric 3rd, then a thicker hot applied 4nd coat... i think the whole thing is a few hundred mil thick, but when done properly its immensely strong and resilient. for crack prep there are some special steps... i think you can roll it over anything less than like 1/16th, but for cracks larger you need a crack isolation step... but i cant remember exactly, i worked on that project many months ago.
    the elongation and tensile stregnth is pretty damn good, but its not going to be the easiest system to install. pretty sure you need one of those roofing asphalt melting kettles.

    ontop of the waterproof coat, you wold want a composite drain as well. checkout the carslile miradrain or the mapei composite drain stuff.

    there are also the bonded membrane systems... and some decent fluid applied moisture cured ones too, but i dont recall ever seeing systems like that used in greenroofs or on burried foundation walls.

  4. #95
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Iowa
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    1,692
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    Oh what fun I remember my first major renovation. Bought a little fixer upper, found termite damage rotted studs and timbers. Love the green treated lumber. $70K later I had a $75K cabin But once you get started you can't stop

  5. #96
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Central Ohio
    Posts
    102
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    1 inch of Closed Cell spray foam on the exterior of the concrete wall for water proofing. We have lined swimming pools with an inch of the stuff.

    Sent from my SM-N915T using Tapatalk

  6. #97
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Iowa
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    Many people think concrete by it self is waterproof. They are 100% wrong, conrete is actually very porous. There are a number of sealants that can be applied to the concrete surface to make it waterproof, that go on very easy and last a lifetime. There are many to chose from, silicones, acrylics, polyuethane, rubber and they all spray or roll on with readily available low cost tools. The black asphalt stuff only lasts a few years. I suggest you check into what is available in your area and use green treated lumber wherever possible anytime it will be in contact with concrete or the soil.

    Good Luck

  7. #98
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Louisburg Kansas
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    For perimeter drains 4" will be fine. 6" is expensive and you don't need it.
    You should have a good idea of how severe the water infiltration is thru the foundation. The best coatings will only stretch about 300% before ripping apart. The size of foundation cracks is total dependent on the quantity and placement of the re-bar. Very few houses have enough re-bar to control cracking enough for coatings to be totally reliable. There is an old adage "You can have one 1/4" crack or ten million cracks you can't see but you will have cracks". Proper earth grading and working gutters will minimize or eliminate the amount of water that gets to the foundation.
    I would choose the most economical coating that has good elastic qualities and go with it. If you don't have a spring or an underground water drainage trail you will be fine. If you choose to insulate the exterior do your homework and make sure the insulation has a proven track record for being buried successfully.

  8. #99
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    KS
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    309
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    Two 4" drains may be cheaper/easier to acquire than one 6" if you are concerned one 4" won't do it. You dang sure don't want to do it again.

  9. #100
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Louisburg Kansas
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    Perimeter drains are not meant to run full of water. The intent is to collect seepage that gets past primary diversion measures which is why they have holes instead of large open slots. If one pipe will not do this neither will two because they can't collect the water fast enough to prevent building a head of water pressure.

  10. #101
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
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    44,158
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    Something I thought of the other day...

    Along that wall where the windows are at grade level... when you slope the dirt away from the house... might add a few drains in the valley of the slope... with 6" pipe... to drain the water rolling down the hill.

    The goal is to keep the water away from the house... and the little that does get there: both the waterproofing of the concrete and the french drain will keep it out.

    Yeah... lots of work... however when it is over... the only biological growth in the house, will be your family... grin!
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  11. #102
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    Jan 2015
    Location
    Iowa
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    I'm not a code freek, but the code books have a lot of handy information in them like: how to size these drains. The materials allowed, soil absorbtion rates, worst rain fall rates by city, how they are to be built, drain capacity tables. The "Book" can be used to verify the design you are thinking of using

  12. #103
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Houston, Tx
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    thats not really true. but i guess it depends on your definition of porous.

    is concrete like glass? no. but its not like sand either.

    the problem with most concrete flatwork and concrete walls is that its not intended to hold back water in the first place.

    trust me its WAY WAY WAY cheaper to design a concrete wall to just handle the lateral earth loads and put in a drainage system to handle the hydrostatic loads.

    look at concrete aeration basins and concrete clarifier basins... concrete CIP lift stations etc. they can be basically waterproof without a coating, its just a matter of quality concrete with the right rebar schedule to prevent shrinkage cracking, right bonding agents... ad mixtures, quality waterstops, quality bentonite plugs, and wet curing etc.
    there are concrete basins built way back in the 70's or 80's that are still uncoated from way back when the epa started first cracking down on waste water effluent... they are still going strong because they were engineered correctly to handle water.

    look up the ACI 350-06... it detaiils concrete storage excellently.

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  14. #104
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Iowa
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    Queequeg Yes you are a smart man after all you are an electrical engineer and design HVAC support systems, correct?

    The wall in question is not a foundation or structual member of the house, it is a retaining wall which happens to be hold quite a bit of water way from the wood wall by the pictures and descriptions posted by the owner.

    If you place an untreated wood member up against concrete which has water (in whatever condition you may find it) on the other side, water will migrate and be transferred to the wood member and overtime those untreated wood members will rot and fail that is why the building code requires that all wood memebers that are in contact with concrete or the soil must be treated. In fact wood structures such as this by code must be 6" above the soil grade . This is what I am referring to. If you have an issue with that, your disagreement it is not with me talk to the code organizations.

    Yes we use conrete containers everywhere to hold or channel water, slurries or a number of other liqidous materials but that does not mean water will not absorbed into the concrete and can evaporate from the oposite surface. Yes you can improve the conrete for your application by changing the mixtures, adding chemicals to it as it is being mixed. Adding tension members, rebar, troweling, power troweling can further improve the conrete for the application. But that has little bearing to water migrating into the wooden members that are below grade in this house. I have read nothing that Snapple4 plans on removing the 4ft high by 4" thick concrete wall that was poured against the wooden exterior wall of his house.

    I have read nothing that indicates how this 4 Ft High by 4" thick retaining wall was built. Just a guess but I think it is pretty fortunate the concrete wall has not cuased the exterior load bearing wall to buckle inward as the house is most likely the supporting structure and keeping the wall from topling. But who knows there may be some purlons (deadmans) running back into the soil to hold the wall up. For being built in the 70" the amount of damage is minimal, just in my opinion.

    Just a thought. The problem many engineers have (and I am not saying you do) is when they get to looking at a problem and begin figuring out a solution (because they know materials, tensile, shear and compression strengths, applicable temperatures, corosion and erosion, torque capability, current carring capability, etc... many times forget to look at the codes and standards that apply to the condition or situation to balance their repair to the rules that apply.

    I'm not arguing, don't what to fight, nor mean any disrepect but I think you are just slightly of target for the situation

    Hope you have a good afternoon

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