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  1. #79
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
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    Quote Originally Posted by queequeg152 View Post
    ^^^ THIS. god you are so right there... its not even funny.

    there are two reasons for this... 1- you can sort of get away with it here... cooling climate mostly with a fairly low temperature delta even in the summer means insulation is less vital and air sealing is less vital.

    2- there was a massive housing boom in the... i wanna say late 70's? they were building houses with NO.3 grade lumber and building like 3 a month where my moms house was built.

    idk what you guys were taught... but i was taught no.3 lumber was BARELY good enough for concrete forming... to use it for a rafter or joist is criminal imho.
    I know well of what you speak...
    I grew up in Houston... left in 1987.

    It is a little better here in Atlanta... not much.
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    GA's basic rules of home heating and AC upgrades:
    *Installation is more important than the brand of equipment
    *The duct system keeps the house comfortable; the equipment only heats and cools (and dehumidifies)
    *Cheap is not good, good is not cheap; however expensive is not a guarantee of quality!
    Choose your contractor wisely!

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  3. #80
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    forney texas
    Posts
    21,092
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    Quote Originally Posted by ga-hvac-tech View Post
    The South is notorious for being cheap, sloppy, and in a hurry when it comes to construction...

    Many a supply house stocks things which anyone with common sense would not use... however it just barely passes code... you know the rest.

    I put L grade in when I did my water line... guy wanted to sell me M. The only thing in the soil in my front yard... is tree roots... The run was a bit less than 40 ft... glad that is done. Digging around the tree roots was the larger part of the job.

    Just curious... how deep do you have to do a water line from the meter to the house?
    I had to do 18"... however I have seen folks in the neighborhood do their own over the weekend, and barely dug 12" deep...
    I think we can get away with 8-10 inches here. My water meter is at 4"


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  4. #81
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Billington Heights, NY
    Posts
    21,625
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    Quote Originally Posted by ga-hvac-tech View Post

    Just curious... how deep do you have to do a water line from the meter to the house?
    I had to do 18"... however I have seen folks in the neighborhood do their own over the weekend, and barely dug 12" deep...
    I recommend to my customers that they bury it 7 feet. 2 years ago we had weather so cold it was still frozen 6 feet down in the middle of JUNE.

  5. #82
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
    Posts
    44,158
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    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    I recommend to my customers that they bury it 7 feet. 2 years ago we had weather so cold it was still frozen 6 feet down in the middle of JUNE.
    Now THAT is a deep freeze...

    Sounds like the local HO is not gonna get out and hand dig this DIY project.

    Neighbor did one over the weekend... Looks like he went about 12-14" deep.
    He used PEX... so it is probably not gonna be freeze sensitive. Not sure I like the fittings he got at HD... however it was not my job.
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    GA's basic rules of home heating and AC upgrades:
    *Installation is more important than the brand of equipment
    *The duct system keeps the house comfortable; the equipment only heats and cools (and dehumidifies)
    *Cheap is not good, good is not cheap; however expensive is not a guarantee of quality!
    Choose your contractor wisely!

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  7. #83
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Louisburg Kansas
    Posts
    4,099
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    For burial depth call the codes people and find out what frost depth is in your area. Dig the trench at least 6 inches deeper to allow sand bed. Remember they have the last word so make sure all your work is compliant. I would get a copy of the local codes before starting any work covered by code.
    With all the problems you have found already it would be a good idea to check the electrical systems (wiring).
    I hope you are not on a septic tank.

  8. #84
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Indianapolis, In
    Posts
    73
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    I busted up our basement floor and dropped a sump pit in, drilled holes in the bottom, sides. Put over a foot of gravel under and around it. At least a our house water pressure forces into the pit first before coming in. Has worked well. One time pump failed, now have a battery backup.
    The last week in Indy have been thinking of building an Arc. I agree with the guys on an outside drain, I would have had to go eight feet deep at our place.
    I feel your pain, good luck.

  9. #85
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    NW Arkansas
    Posts
    1,056
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by WAYNE3298 View Post
    For burial depth call the codes people and find out what frost depth is in your area. Dig the trench at least 6 inches deeper to allow sand bed. Remember they have the last word so make sure all your work is compliant. I would get a copy of the local codes before starting any work covered by code.
    With all the problems you have found already it would be a good idea to check the electrical systems (wiring).
    I hope you are not on a septic tank.
    Electrical looks good. All copper and has a grounding rod. Does not have a main disconnect so I will put one in eventually. Have a few plugs/light switches need to figure out but not many.

    Not on septic but was originally. Instead of destroying it when they went to sewer they just threw a cinder block over it (over 25 years ago). Had it crushed and filled the other week. Didn't want that liability.



    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

  10. #86
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    9,765
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    When its all over, monitor with reliable %RH meter. Maintain <50% during all season to avoid mold at the cool surfaces of the structure. This will require a good dehumidifier.
    The cool surfaces will condense moisture whenever the indoor dew points are near the cool surfaces temperature.
    Keep us posted.
    Regards Teddy Bear
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

  11. #87
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    NW Arkansas
    Posts
    1,056
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by teddy bear View Post
    When its all over, monitor with reliable %RH meter. Maintain <50% during all season to avoid mold at the cool surfaces of the structure. This will require a good dehumidifier.
    The cool surfaces will condense moisture whenever the indoor dew points are near the cool surfaces temperature.
    Keep us posted.
    Regards Teddy Bear
    Since you posted... This house has two gas packs... Are your units compatible with a package unit or does a unit need to find a home inside the house and ducting go from there?

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  12. #88
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
    Posts
    44,158
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snaple4 View Post
    Since you posted... This house has two gas packs... Are your units compatible with a package unit or does a unit need to find a home inside the house and ducting go from there?

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
    I would look into free-standing and ducted... sometimes that is that is a good solution.
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    GA's basic rules of home heating and AC upgrades:
    *Installation is more important than the brand of equipment
    *The duct system keeps the house comfortable; the equipment only heats and cools (and dehumidifies)
    *Cheap is not good, good is not cheap; however expensive is not a guarantee of quality!
    Choose your contractor wisely!

  13. #89
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    NW Arkansas
    Posts
    1,056
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    Thread Starter
    Another slow update.

    Thank you everyone for helping out. This house has been quite the project and leaning experience.

    They built the house (all cedar mind you) below grade. After they were done they poured a concrete wall 4' up to hold back the dirt. Well they poured it against the 3/4 ply attached to the studs.... Lots of water damage along these (though not as much as I would have thought so originally they had really good dainage). Where I can we are tearing it out but it isn't much. Does a anyone have any suggestions on if I should put anything back?

    Found even more termite damage so more studs are coming out.

    I have a mold remediation company coming​ out next week to spray. He said it was serium or something similar. Said it boils the mold out if the wood (we took out all the sheetrock that had any signs of mold). Am having carpets cleaned as well.

    New gutters next week.

    I should be starting the French drain next week. We are waiting on someone we know who can operate the machinery. I plan on cutting out the driveway to allow a new water line to be placed. Still haven't decided on what to out down but leaning towards copper.

    Trying to get someone to clean my ductwork but not sure I can afford that yet...

    Having an independent mold testing company coming after all that stuff and before I replaced drywall.

    Positive side, I should be able to use all the extra dirt to replace all the washed out backfill along the slab retaining wall on the back side of the house...

    Glad we have been slow at work so I can do some of this.

    What is everyone's suggestion for water proofing exterior of the concrete wall? Also, do I use regular rigid foam board laid against the wall to insulate the exterior?

    Like my negative pressure setup?

    By the way, moving those big rocks along the front is hard work.

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  14. #90
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    NW Arkansas
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    Thread Starter
    One more thing. I have about 90' worth for the French drain. How do I figure out how big of a perforated pipe I need? Supply houses here have only 3&4" I don't want to lay a 4" 90' long pipe and find it won't keep up.

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  15. #91
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Louisburg Kansas
    Posts
    4,099
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    What is going to be connected to the French drain?

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