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  1. #66
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
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    Billington Heights, NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by ga-hvac-tech View Post
    Hmmm...
    Seems each type of water supply pipe has its issues...

    Personally... if the run is not so long as to cause the price to be high...
    I would use copper.

    Replaced mine about a decade ago with copper, 3/4 roll. Note that copper water pipe is NOT the same as refrigeration water pipe... the copper pipe has a thicker wall, to deal with being buried. Be sure you get water pipe.

    So the things needed:
    Gutters and downspouts, piped downhill and away from the house...
    Repairs of drain lines in the house...
    New water supply pipe and pressure regulator...

    Yeah... that should eat up your home maintenance budget for a while... grin!
    Copper water pipe is Type K.

    Plastic is fine, too. You can sand bed it as others have suggested or sleeve it inside of another larger pipe.

  2. #67
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
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    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    Copper water pipe is Type K.

    Plastic is fine, too. You can sand bed it as others have suggested or sleeve it inside of another larger pipe.
    If you can find it... most supply houses have L and M...
    And of course the big box stores only have M...
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    GA's basic rules of home heating and AC upgrades:
    *Installation is more important than the brand of equipment
    *The duct system keeps the house comfortable; the equipment only heats and cools (and dehumidifies)
    *Cheap is not good, good is not cheap; however expensive is not a guarantee of quality!
    Choose your contractor wisely!

  3. #68
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    Mar 2013
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    Billington Heights, NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by ga-hvac-tech View Post
    If you can find it... most supply houses have L and M...
    And of course the big box stores only have M...
    I just checked my supply house. They have multiple rolls of Type K copper from 1/4" to 1-1/4". Up to 100 ft rolls. And various quantities of each type. You must have bad supply houses

    Here, a roll of Type K 1" x 100ft copper is just under $400. And there's 4 available.

  4. #69
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    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
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    The South is notorious for being cheap, sloppy, and in a hurry when it comes to construction...

    Many a supply house stocks things which anyone with common sense would not use... however it just barely passes code... you know the rest.

    I put L grade in when I did my water line... guy wanted to sell me M. The only thing in the soil in my front yard... is tree roots... The run was a bit less than 40 ft... glad that is done. Digging around the tree roots was the larger part of the job.

    Just curious... how deep do you have to do a water line from the meter to the house?
    I had to do 18"... however I have seen folks in the neighborhood do their own over the weekend, and barely dug 12" deep...
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    GA's basic rules of home heating and AC upgrades:
    *Installation is more important than the brand of equipment
    *The duct system keeps the house comfortable; the equipment only heats and cools (and dehumidifies)
    *Cheap is not good, good is not cheap; however expensive is not a guarantee of quality!
    Choose your contractor wisely!

  5. Likes queequeg152 liked this post.
  6. #70
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    NW Arkansas
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    Thread Starter
    I budgeted for the gutters and a few other things... Was planning on degrading the front over the course of the next few months. Was planning on doing a French drain and the water line next year. So the ripping out of the walls, fixing old termite damage, fixing mold issue if I have one (having guy come on Monday to check), digging a French drain/water line sooner then planned, fixing broken drain line, replacing and painting sheetrock, and replacing carpet in that bedroom was not accounted for. We did decide to only put 15% down instead of 20 just in case (it also gave us a lower interest rate oddly enough) so that is helping support this. I also have a family member that doesn't work but gets a monthly check so he is helping work on the house.

    I think we have to go 18"-24" on our water line to be code here. Debating on if I will hire the plumber to do it or if I will just take care of it. Guess it depends on how busy I get when it comes time to do it.



    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

  7. #71
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Louisburg Kansas
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    Pipe coatings and wraps have been used extensively on buried pipe. The problem with both is that any holiday in the coating concentrates the galvanic action in that spot. If care is taken not to damage the coating and if buried in a sand pack that method works well.
    I like copper but it is cost prohibitive many times.
    What ever you use install it properly.

  8. #72
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    Feb 2016
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    Louisburg Kansas
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    Snaple4,
    What is your definition of a French drain. A true French drain close to the house is not what you want. Not trying to start a discussion on what a French drain is but how you install drains around the house is critical. True French drains are akin to laterals.

  9. #73
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    NW Arkansas
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by WAYNE3298 View Post
    Snaple4,
    What is your definition of a French drain. A true French drain close to the house is not what you want. Not trying to start a discussion on what a French drain is but how you install drains around the house is critical. True French drains are akin to laterals.
    I am not a lanscaping professional so a discussion is welcome if someone thinks I may be going down the wrong path.

    What I have been contemplating is digging along the concrete wall and next to the foundation /footer. Lay a bed of angular gravel with fabric. Lay a pvc perforated​ pipe 4-6" depending on calculations next to footer but not going above. Continue to fill with gravel till near top of concrete wall then cover with fabric. Put plastic down to slope away from house. Fill last section with rock or something else. Will daylight the pipe(s) down the hill away from the house. Will also run downspouts into solid PVC pipe away from house. Haven't figured that part out yet because not sure if I should combine the two underground or keep separate.

    Is this not an appropriate means to keep moisture away from the concrete wall?



    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

  10. Likes ga-hvac-tech liked this post.
  11. #74
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    3,380
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    I have the 1" Black Plastic well pipe from my well to the house. Been in the ground for close to 30 years. When I go away, I turn the well switch off and mark the gauge. Check for leak down when I come back. Thing I don't like is they came through the wall with no sleeve. Copper K or L pipe only last three to four years here, before being eaten through by soil acids.
    Retired, after 43 Years

  12. #75
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Louisburg Kansas
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    Your installation method is on target. Believe it or not I have dug up foundations and found perforated pipe connected to roof drains. Terminology doesn't count but install does.

  13. Likes ga-hvac-tech liked this post.
  14. #76
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
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    If it were me...

    I would not connect the gutter downspouts to the french drain outlet until I was seriously DOWN (elevation) from the house.

    If for some reason there was a blockage in the far end... you would, in effect, be filling the french drain with water...
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    GA's basic rules of home heating and AC upgrades:
    *Installation is more important than the brand of equipment
    *The duct system keeps the house comfortable; the equipment only heats and cools (and dehumidifies)
    *Cheap is not good, good is not cheap; however expensive is not a guarantee of quality!
    Choose your contractor wisely!

  15. #77
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    New Mexico
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    9,656
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    Here's an idea. I had a house built in 1918. I had a lead water service that shared with my neighbor. I developed a leak and told my neighbor, who was a plumber, I had to put in a new pipe to the street. He said he'd do the same and we'd get rid of the shared pipe situation.
    So I dig my way to the street to lay the new pipe. Four feet deep and 15' long.

    But why I'm telling y'all this is what the plumber did. It never occurred to me but he dug a hole where he was going to connect to city water. Then, in his basement he brought in a big air compressor hose and a jack hammer. He drilled a hole in the wall and using the jack hammer drove a 1 1/4" black pipe with plugs on both ends through the ground to the water main then ran the new copper pipe inside the pipe he drove through the wall. It took about 45 minutes. My hole took a few days and I had to refurbish the lawn.
    I guess he was lucky he didn't hit a rock or something that might have made the driven pipe loose it's way but everything worked.
    Something I always thought I'd use some day but haven't yet. It was obvious he had done this before.
    Give me a relay with big enough contacts, and I'll run the world!

    You can be anything you want......As long as you don't suck at it.

    If a person wants to create a machine that will be more likely to fail...Make it complicated.

    USAF 98 Bomb Wing 1960-66 SMW Lu49

  16. #78
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Houston, Tx
    Posts
    142
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    Quote Originally Posted by ga-hvac-tech View Post
    The South is notorious for being cheap, sloppy, and in a hurry when it comes to construction...

    Many a supply house stocks things which anyone with common sense would not use... however it just barely passes code... you know the rest.

    I put L grade in when I did my water line... guy wanted to sell me M. The only thing in the soil in my front yard... is tree roots... The run was a bit less than 40 ft... glad that is done. Digging around the tree roots was the larger part of the job.

    Just curious... how deep do you have to do a water line from the meter to the house?
    I had to do 18"... however I have seen folks in the neighborhood do their own over the weekend, and barely dug 12" deep...
    ^^^ THIS. god you are so right there... its not even funny.

    there are two reasons for this... 1- you can sort of get away with it here... cooling climate mostly with a fairly low temperature delta even in the summer means insulation is less vital and air sealing is less vital.

    2- there was a massive housing boom in the... i wanna say late 70's? they were building houses with NO.3 grade lumber and building like 3 a month where my moms house was built.

    idk what you guys were taught... but i was taught no.3 lumber was BARELY good enough for concrete forming... to use it for a rafter or joist is criminal imho.

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