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  1. #53
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
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    There should be a water pressure regulator after the meter, before the house (that may be one outdoor spigot before the pressure regulator)...
    Get yourself a pressure gauge that screws onto a water hose spigot valve... Then turn on the water and off again... you should see the water flow at around 50-60 PSI... then slowly creep up again.

    Regardless... the water pressure should STAY between 50-60 ALL the time!
    If it is not staying within this range... replace the pressure regulator... you can find them at the big box store... HD has one model, Lowes has another model... might take a cell pic and go to the store and find the one that matches... less hassle to install it.
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    GA's basic rules of home heating and AC upgrades:
    *Installation is more important than the brand of equipment
    *The duct system keeps the house comfortable; the equipment only heats and cools (and dehumidifies)
    *Cheap is not good, good is not cheap; however expensive is not a guarantee of quality!
    Choose your contractor wisely!

  2. #54
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    NW Arkansas
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    Thread Starter
    It is copper at the meter but it is galvanized as it comes out of the ground Into the garage. Galvanized runs along garage floor (covered by wooden enclosure) then it turns to copper somehow as it enters the house. I will open up that wall tomorrow and check. Water company thinks it is underground somewhere. I can work with copper but not so much with corroded galvanized pipe.

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  3. #55
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Iowa
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    As for the the cracks in the vertical cast iron; the vast majority of the time this type of crack is caused from house settling and applying a stress to the pipe and/or hydrogen sulfide gas (which can form sulfiric acid) that is created by the decomposition of the material (small bit & scraps of whatever went in) in the whole pipe not just that vertical piece and/or just plain old corrosion. The sewer line (horizontal or vertical) by design are to be empty and void of standing water. They are never intended to be "full" (only traps are full). If they are full there is a blockage in the line. If the vertical pipe had been full of water from blockage on the horizontal, the water would also be coming up in the basement sinks, toilets and floor drains (if they don't have a backwater protection)

    Per the code (Uniform Plumbing Code) "Normal" water pressure is 40 - 60 psi. If your water pressure exceeds 80 psi a regulator should be installed immediately after the water meter.

    Is this a well system (community well) or city municipal water system. Keep in mind the that water will exert 2.31 pounds per foot of elevation. So if your your water supply starts at the top of the hill and comes down 20ft lower in elevation into your house the weight of the water alone will add 46 pounds of pressure. If the pump is creating 60 pounds of pressure that will be 106 pounds of pressure where it enters your house. The reason I asked about a well system or community well, is the wells pressure control could be defective and need repair.

    I hate galvanized water pipe, every chance I get I replace it with copper or PEX. Becareful if you choose to replace it maybe ilegal for you to work on any pipe before the meter.

    If this is a city munucipal water system, (unless you already know) ask the city where the ownership boundary is. Some cities it is at the meter, some cities it is before the curb isolation valve, some cities it is at the curb isolation valve. In almost every case it is ilegal for you as the homeowner to touch (work on) the water meter and back to the water main. The reason you need to know who owns the supply is to determine who pays for the repair when it is needed.

    It sounds as if you are getting some answers, but I understand it is a pain in the Axx and there is cost you did not plan for.

    Good Luck

  4. #56
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Billington Heights, NY
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    21,625
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snaple4 View Post
    Also, what is the max psi for residential water pipe? I am sitting at 140..... isn't it suppose to be 60?

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    the health department here prefers 60-70 psi.

  5. #57
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    NW Arkansas
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    Thread Starter
    It is city water. The meter us at the top of the driveway. Has copper going into and out of the meter but galvanized entering my garage. Goes underground till it enters my garage about 10-15 feet lower than meter. It turns to copper right as it enters the house.

    First picture is as it enters the house.

    2nd is as it enters the garage.

    One valve is a main shutoff the other is to a hose connection.


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  6. #58
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Louisburg Kansas
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    Buried galvanized pipe is not good especially when connected to a significant amount of copper pipe. I would replace the buried portion with properly installed CPVC.

  7. #59
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    NW Arkansas
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by WAYNE3298 View Post
    Buried galvanized pipe is not good especially when connected to a significant amount of copper pipe. I would replace the buried portion with properly installed CPVC.
    Why is it bad when connected to a significant amount of copper pipe? I don't disagree though that the galvanized needs to go. I'm hoping to start a French drain within the next month and I will do it then. (Since I have the front dug out anyways). On that is cpvc the best for buried water lines?

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  8. #60
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    forney texas
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    21,092
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snaple4 View Post
    Why is it bad when connected to a significant amount of copper pipe? I don't disagree though that the galvanized needs to go. I'm hoping to start a French drain within the next month and I will do it then. (Since I have the front dug out anyways). On that is cpvc the best for buried water lines?

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    I think it would fall under galvanic corrosion.


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  9. #61
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Louisburg Kansas
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    The short answer is that galvanic cell action from the steel pipe to the earth eats the steel pipe away over time. The copper connected to the steel basically generates a cell action that makes the problem worse. Dielectric unions or insulated flanges are used for connection of copper to steel but if the steel is buried it should also be protected from erosion. One method is with sacrificial anodes. CPVC will not conduct current and only needs to be installed to prevent physical damage.
    My water line from the meter to the house is just over 250 feet long. When I installed it the lumber yards were having a price war on 3 inch thin wall PVC drain pipe. I encased the CPVC water line inside the drain pipe 35 years ago. Last month my yard hydrant inlet fitting went bad and began leaking. Since the water line was not exposed to rocks in the ground it was easy to find the leak. If you can install the line like that you will not have problems with rocks working their way thru your pipe.

  10. #62
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Iowa
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    Check with the city and see what they allow for under ground. The primary area I work in the cities require 1" copper for new underground service (used to be 3/4" copper)

    Out in the County what is primarily used is HDPE (High Density Polyethelene) The rolled black stuff.

    I've done lots of work for a 68 acre campground over the years. It was build 50 years ago. The underground water system has galvanized, HDPE and Copper. The galvanized stuff leaks all the time (pin hole leaks from through wall corrosion). The HDPE repaired 3 leaks in last 4 years and have another to do this year. Failure looks like a ncik or cut from rocks or bad handling when installed. Have not had a leak from copper yet, but copper is expensive. If it were me I'd use HDPE and use a sand bed before covering with dirt.

    Good luck

  11. #63
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Louisburg Kansas
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    Sand bed is one preferred method of underground install. I was lucky enough when installing mine that the 3 inch PVC was cheaper than sand. If properly done it will protect for several years. The original install here was copper and it leaked like a watering hose. Ground rock will do that if precautions are not taken.

  12. #64
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Bay Area California
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    26,577
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    Had a job we won the bid on several years ago. Something like a 3" copper main to a building. Everything was engineered. The soil was tested and found to be slightly acidic. So we had to wrap the copper with a special tape while applying a special glue at the same time. Similar to how underground galvy gas lines are run.

    Sort of messy, but not really that big of a deal.


    Quote Originally Posted by WAYNE3298 View Post
    Sand bed is one preferred method of underground install. I was lucky enough when installing mine that the 3 inch PVC was cheaper than sand. If properly done it will protect for several years. The original install here was copper and it leaked like a watering hose. Ground rock will do that if precautions are not taken.

  13. #65
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
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    Hmmm...
    Seems each type of water supply pipe has its issues...

    Personally... if the run is not so long as to cause the price to be high...
    I would use copper.

    Replaced mine about a decade ago with copper, 3/4 roll. Note that copper water pipe is NOT the same as refrigeration water pipe... the copper pipe has a thicker wall, to deal with being buried. Be sure you get water pipe.

    So the things needed:
    Gutters and downspouts, piped downhill and away from the house...
    Repairs of drain lines in the house...
    New water supply pipe and pressure regulator...

    Yeah... that should eat up your home maintenance budget for a while... grin!
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    GA's basic rules of home heating and AC upgrades:
    *Installation is more important than the brand of equipment
    *The duct system keeps the house comfortable; the equipment only heats and cools (and dehumidifies)
    *Cheap is not good, good is not cheap; however expensive is not a guarantee of quality!
    Choose your contractor wisely!

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