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  1. #27
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    Sep 2005
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    This is a bit on the 'lots of work' approach...

    What about digging enough of a wide shallow walled ditch along that west wall... the front door is a step UP?
    Expose about 6" of the retaining wall and have a downwards slope away from the house, say 6-8 ft... then a retaining wall to hold the hillside.

    This would, of course, be done AFTER the gutters/downspouts AND re-waterproofing the house wall below grand AND the french drain.

    The reason for the suggestion: If water seepage in the soil tended to run off away from the house... it would not get to the house... which is always a good thing!

    Thoughts???
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    GA's basic rules of home heating and AC upgrades:
    *Installation is more important than the brand of equipment
    *The duct system keeps the house comfortable; the equipment only heats and cools (and dehumidifies)
    *Cheap is not good, good is not cheap; however expensive is not a guarantee of quality!
    Choose your contractor wisely!

  2. #28
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    Apr 2017
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    Houston, Tx
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    Quote Originally Posted by ga-hvac-tech View Post
    The reason for the suggestion: If water seepage in the soil tended to run off away from the house... it would not get to the house... which is always a good thing!
    Thoughts???
    yea positive drainage is very important. so are proper gutters as constant splashing agaist siding is at the very least a maintianance issue with mold and dirt splash back, and at the worst... wood rot etc.

    but if its really a ground water issue, simply re grading will not solve the issue.

  3. #29
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    Sep 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by queequeg152 View Post
    yea positive drainage is very important. so are proper gutters as constant splashing agaist siding is at the very least a maintianance issue with mold and dirt splash back, and at the worst... wood rot etc.

    but if its really a ground water issue, simply re grading will not solve the issue.
    Please do not hear me picking on anyone...

    Above is my third post in this thread... mentioned a number of times about the gutters...

    It seems normal at this forum for folks to not read ALL the posts BEFORE commenting...
    Shows a lack of thorough information gathering...

    Personally... I would not hire a tech that was in that much of a hurry...
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    GA's basic rules of home heating and AC upgrades:
    *Installation is more important than the brand of equipment
    *The duct system keeps the house comfortable; the equipment only heats and cools (and dehumidifies)
    *Cheap is not good, good is not cheap; however expensive is not a guarantee of quality!
    Choose your contractor wisely!

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    New Mexico
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    I remember a house that had a sump pump constantly running otherwise the basement would flood. Odd in that the owners decided to do a basement family room even with this situation.
    The way the landscape is pitched to the house, as you know, is all backwards. Most tile or drain solutions have failure written all over them. A fail safe solution is what I could sleep with. Like a short retaining wall diverting water around your home. Even that's easier than digging up the perimeter.
    The best solution is one that prevents the foundation wall from ever seeing any quantity of water. This means stopping water before it gets there.

    But that's another trade. I have heard of companies with injection systems for waterproofing. It consists of drilling holes and injecting some product. That's all I remember but it might be way cheaper than excavating. Excavating has another drawback. That's the possibility of the foundation wall caving in. That's the reasoning behind installing the first floor decking before back filling the foundation.
    Give me a relay with big enough contacts, and I'll run the world!

    You can be anything you want......As long as you don't suck at it.

    If a person wants to create a machine that will be more likely to fail...Make it complicated.

    USAF 98 Bomb Wing 1960-66 SMW Lu49

  5. #31
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Ft. Worth, TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by hvacker View Post
    I remember a house that had a sump pump constantly running otherwise the basement would flood. Odd in that the owners decided to do a basement family room even with this situation.
    The way the landscape is pitched to the house, as you know, is all backwards. Most tile or drain solutions have failure written all over them. A fail safe solution is what I could sleep with. Like a short retaining wall diverting water around your home. Even that's easier than digging up the perimeter.
    The best solution is one that prevents the foundation wall from ever seeing any quantity of water. This means stopping water before it gets there.

    But that's another trade. I have heard of companies with injection systems for waterproofing. It consists of drilling holes and injecting some product. That's all I remember but it might be way cheaper than excavating. Excavating has another drawback. That's the possibility of the foundation wall caving in. That's the reasoning behind installing the first floor decking before back filling the foundation.
    That's what finally stopped the leak in my dad's foundation. The daughter of a friend came and drilled some holes in the foundation wall and then squirted in some type of expoxy under high pressure. This stopped the leak. My dad also redid the drain tile under the area where the leak was, so it would drain better. He had the same problem the OP did in that the grade of the yard was towards the house rather than away from it. The basement wall was an 8 foot high wall that was poured "hot", and it cracked early on. It took dad several years to finally find a permanent solution. The leak was right underneath the area of the bay window in this house:

    No one is useless in this world who lightens the burdens of another. -- Charles Dickens

  6. #32
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    Feb 2004
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    New Mexico
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    I built a house where I hired a guy to literally re-sculpt the landscape. When I had just installed the deck a hard rain came and popped the sump crock out of the basement floor. The digging had exposed a spring. Glad it didn't happen again.
    Out of fear of failure I ran 4"abs drain both inside and outside the foundation in 18" rock bed covered with red rosin paper, damp proofed the foundation walls and added 1" of blue board to the outside wall, top to bottom. I had put blue board on the ground before pouring the basement floor.
    I never had water problems plus the basement was warm.

    Reshaping the land is the most foolproof and the most expensive especially with mature trees. The guy that re-shaped mine took 5 days to do it. About one acre.
    Short of re-shaping other fixes can fail. Drain tiles can plug up especially if next to soil. Any waterproofing to foundation walls has a probable life expectancy. Water will find a way.
    Maybe short of a water wall a swale(sp) could be dug a ways away from the house as a diversion channel.
    Give me a relay with big enough contacts, and I'll run the world!

    You can be anything you want......As long as you don't suck at it.

    If a person wants to create a machine that will be more likely to fail...Make it complicated.

    USAF 98 Bomb Wing 1960-66 SMW Lu49

  7. #33
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    In Maryland if a house is sold and determined to be unlivable, or a part
    of it is unlivable, the previous owner can be held responsible. Only way around this is if the house was a foreclosure or the buyer signed this away.
    Retired, after 43 Years

  8. #34
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    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
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    My house had a block wall basement... similar to in the OP's pics...
    When I moved in, it leaked in a HARD rain...
    First thing I did... was re-slope the gutters and divert the downspouts with 4" black pipe (the flexible corrugated stuff at HD). This helped a bunch. Then we got a REALLY HARD rain... and water again. Next, I re-slopped the ground at the house walls... to form ditches the water flowed TO... which were AWAY from the house.
    So far (over a decade) this has worked.
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    GA's basic rules of home heating and AC upgrades:
    *Installation is more important than the brand of equipment
    *The duct system keeps the house comfortable; the equipment only heats and cools (and dehumidifies)
    *Cheap is not good, good is not cheap; however expensive is not a guarantee of quality!
    Choose your contractor wisely!

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    NW Arkansas
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    Thread Starter
    An update after it stopped raining and started again...

    First, the house is an as-is house... Foreclosed on after original owners passed away then a LLC purchased it. They rented it out then listed for sale. No disclosure. I know they knew about the issues but no way I can prove it. Even if there was a disclosure (they would have listed known on everything and I still wouldn't be able to prove it).

    So I found where most of the water is coming from. A cast iron vent pipe had cracked. It runs to the side right before the outside wall then runs up. During inspection I hired a company to scope the sewer lines. The whole main line from I side the house to the sewer line has been replaced with pvc. Never thought about checking inside the wall since it is pvc under the sinks. Apparently when the replaced that they left the stacks and a few other parts. Neighbors are all still on cast iron . Anyways, when it rained I get water down the pipe. I also get some water out when the upstairs sinks get used. I found it because I decided to rip out walls to make sure and to look for mold.

    Found mold... Not much but enough I am cutting out a ton of sheetrock and wood. Soaked with Lysol and am removing it all. Made a makeshift negative pressure zone with a furnace blower I had laying around for when we are working.

    I am, if I can, replace all the cast iron on this run. Looks like only this pipe failed though. The stack past the 2nd floor and the horizontal run from the downstairs sinks looks good. Upstairs sinks are pvc till the stack.

    I am getting some water from the ground. Right now I have a guy scheduled to replace the gutters. They didn't use a wedge so they have tilted and allow a lot of water to spill over. I am also going to dig out the ground and slope it away from the house. Hopefully this fixes the water infiltration but i will still be planning a French drain system.

    Any if you guys know how to calculate the required pipe size(s) for a drain? The length is like 85+ feet.

    My boss said I needed to stack two drains.. have a 4-6" pipe below slab the have another about 1.5' above that...

    You guys are a great resource.



    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

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  11. #36
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    Sep 2005
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    Good find... nothing like digging until the obvious, yet obscure, reveals itself!

    YUP...
    Combination of that lenghwise crack and the broken spot... you have a leak sir...

    Good place to start... get rid of ALL the iron drain pipe!
    The gutters and sloping the dirt should handle 90% of it for now...
    Give you some breathing space until you get time and $$$ to do a proper french drain!
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    GA's basic rules of home heating and AC upgrades:
    *Installation is more important than the brand of equipment
    *The duct system keeps the house comfortable; the equipment only heats and cools (and dehumidifies)
    *Cheap is not good, good is not cheap; however expensive is not a guarantee of quality!
    Choose your contractor wisely!

  12. #37
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    3,680
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    That long crack says the house was with out heat at some time during the winter and the pipe froze with water in it
    I hope you get it all fixed and all is well again

  13. #38
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    May 2014
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    Let's see . . . Back in post #5 I said:

    "Personally, I'd probably rip out the interior wall first. So I could see exactly where the water was coming in."



    Glad you found that !!

  14. Likes Snaple4 liked this post.
  15. #39
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    Sep 2014
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    Let's see . . . Back in post #5 I said:

    "Personally, I'd probably rip out the interior wall first. So I could see exactly where the water was coming in."



    Glad you found that !!
    The guy I have working with me was against ripping out the walls. Told him it is best to look for mold and any other possibilities of water now than later. So with that he agreed to help. Good news is we found the main water source. Bad news is I have two water issues to deal with. I am actually more concerned about mold than anything. Didn't find much but I did find it. The joys of liquid Lysol poured everywhere before I start ripping it all out.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

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