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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    You need to run Corex solid drain pipe underground off your downspouts and follow a natural slope for the piping. Don't use the Perforated Corex, and run the Corex one foot up the house to tie into the downspout. The Corex will have to be buried just past your frost line for the horizontal runs. Also you are leaking on the backside of your rain gutters, this is from either clogged gutters or the gutters have cupped from expansion and contraction on the back side. The big box lumber stores sell flashing that goes under the shingle edges to close this gap. The grate drain needs to be cleaned and the tile drain is probably full of roots. I'd abandon it and run Corex off of the grate. BTW I'd invest in a power washer, and a drain jetter for the power washer. Karcher has the cheapest deal with an electric power washer and a drain jetter Karcher Model 2.642-183.0. I have seen the jetters at some Walmarts, and they are online. For your outside Moss, Algae and Mildew use bleach in a coil gun set on 10:1 Don't use this on the Cedar Shakes. For the Cedar shakes use Wet-n-Forget Outside. You can also use wet and forget on the surfaces treated with bleach after its been washed off to prevent a grow back for two years.
    Retired, after 43 Years

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Central Ohio
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    102
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    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    It's like this:

    http://www.drylok.com/formulas/drylok-extreme/

    But beware, the stuff is extremely expensive. It can be colored like normal paint. But, it doesnt always work well. I did an entire block wall cellar with it. 2 coats. Cost me a little under a grand. They advertise that it'll hold back water at 15psi but ive found that to be in marketing BS only. It helps a little but I didnt turn to to be a permanent fix.
    Drylok really does not work well

    Sent from my SM-N915T using Tapatalk

  3. #16
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    KS
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    I'd poke around in the front yard and make sure some bone head didn't cover up the original drain tile outlet. Look for a spot that stays wet longer than any other.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Billington Heights, NY
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    21,625
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    Also look for -

    failing city water lines
    failing well water lines
    abandoned water or drain lines
    abandoned fuel oil or gas lines

    there are things that allow water entry that may not be obvious

  5. Likes acmanko liked this post.
  6. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Iowa
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    Hey, Something does not appear to be correct, could you please provide a little more information. Your very first picture of the drywall cut open, is the floor level above or below grade?

    What is shown in the first picture appears to be wood siding on the ouside of the studs. If that picure is really above grade it would not be too bad to repair.

    Someone was on the right track see the drain several feet out from the door with the "Welcom" mat. You want to do something similar but much closer to the house.

    You need to make a break to prevent the water for coming up next to the house. Small track hoe, some perforated tube and rock would solve most of the problem.

    Please provide if the wall in the first picture is above or below grade.

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  8. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    NW Arkansas
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    Thread Starter
    Thank you everyone for the feedback.

    Answer-Man , the picture with the sheetrock is underground up to the 4' level. The wood behind the insulation has concrete behind it (not sure if anything is before the concrete though). On my first outside picture, the last window closest to the corner is the one inside the room.

    Right now I am trying to decide if I want to do all the work myself (hire someone to dig, pay for rock delivery, design drain system and lay it in there, water proof the concrete wall...) or hire a contractor that will guarantee the work.

    I'll get more pictures today or tomorrow to show you. You guys will get a kick out of the garage..... :-(

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

  9. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Iowa
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    Thank you, That is what it appeard to be from the pictures. Since the house was built in the 1970 timeframe, the concrete wall appears is holding the majority of moisture away from the exterior
    wood wall. The water marks you see inside are probably from water going over the top of the concrete wall and allowing water (Snow Melt) between the house and inside of the concrete wall. As I said using a
    track hoe puting in a drain tube can be done easily in a weekend. Re-landscaping another weekend. As a mater of fact I have a skid loader with a backhoe attachement, just did a similar job at
    my brothers house over the weekend

    Good luck

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  11. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    The Drain Grate is in the correct location, but it isn't long enough. I'm wondering if it didn't get buried. Don't dig next to your foundation without getting a pro to look at it. I've seen footers broken, walls collapsed and floors cracked. Worst I saw was an entire basement floor that had dropped about a foot. On that one someone had cut the floor around the perimeter. Installed drain pipe. When they repoured the perimeter they didn't pin it to the old floor and dig under the edge so the new concrete would be under the lip of the old floor.
    Retired, after 43 Years

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  13. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Houston, Tx
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    142
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    like others have said, your biggest issue is very likely the grade of your landscape. the best way to address this imho, would be an engineered retaining wall and regrading aggressively away from the home, and drain both the retaining wall and gutter system into a subsurface drainage sytem outfalling like 50'-100 feet away in a roadside ditch or where ever you can.

    this still might not solve the issue totally unfortunatly.

    traditionally basement retrofit waterproofing is handled with exterior or interior retrofiting of a sort of french drain system draining to a sump, or gravity flowing to an outfall somewhere.

    in the case of an exterior retrofit, a crude survey should be made of the underlying soil to determine the permeability and saturated water table. if you have a high clay content, highly plastic or cohesive soil, you will have very low permeability, and the saturated water table will be very high. for example at my place, the water table will come up to literally 2" from top of grade after a heavy rainfall. ask me how i know this.

    if you have soil conditions l like do, an exterior retrofit would mean that you would need to excavate a good amount of existing material and replace it with highly permeable engineered fill material at a side slope that would prevent sidewall collapses of the virgin ground during excavation. you seperate the engineered fill from the virgin ground wiith a geotextile fabric that extends to the surface, and ideally extends down under your footing, but this is not always possible or advisible.

    the wall is then waterproofed with a membrane or drainage composite like miradrain or the carlisle products(cannot recall the name). the drainage membrane then terminates inside what is essentially a french drain, and you continuously pump or gravity flow all of the moisture collected untill the water table falls below the foundation footing.

    as i said, this is all insanely expensive unfortunatly. your best bet right now would be to reconfigure your gutters, and try and regrade this portion of your yard for positive drainage. if you have highly permeable soil, you will still get ground water flowing down this hiillside though... its impossible to tell from the pics, but its very possible that even with grading work you would continue to have issues to some extent.

    you see... after rain, water does not just shoot straight down into the ground, it will actually flow down through permeable strata flowing along contours that approximate the surface contours.

    when you dig in a foundation... you are basically puttin in a coffer dam that may be intersecting these temporary ground water flows. i kinda doubt this is the case for you... but you should check with your neighbors who have similar house configurations.

    like i said its probably 90% that your grade is the issue... a proper retaining wall would probably help you out immensly, but so would just re grading away from the hosue.

    [img]http://2.bp.********.com/-5HWQ7cCEipk/Vn1a18LndYI/AAAAAAAACn8/4fwJiKgZjns/s1600/darcy.jpg[/img]

  14. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    NW Arkansas
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    Thread Starter
    You guys are a wealth of knowledge on this. Thank you for posting your thoughts/views.



    1st is North looking south. The section with the rails is the garage. It has its own host of issues I will post later.

    2nd is still looking south to South West. The drain you see is attached to the northern downspout only.

    3rd is at the southern end (side I am getting the water in on) looking east. You can see were the retaining wall stops and my slab starts.

    4th is at Southern end looking west.

    5th is south looking north.

    6th is a close up up the below grade section. My wife is starting to freak out about mold since it is wet and has gotten wet before... Anyone see anything?

    Lots of work to do. I do know the grading towards the house isn't helping but it hasn't rained in two days but if I turn off the blower water starts to trickle back in along the wall...

    I will start to dig out on the southern end. I will find out for sure if they had any drains installed originally.


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  15. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Houston, Tx
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    sorry you are having this issue. its a perennial issue with older homes with frost footings or basement walls... and it always seems to cost insane amounts to fully address. whats worse is issues with NEW homes due to poor building practices and poor installations and poorly engineered systems.

    first let me say... your hose looks lovely. i always loved cedar shake, its just so classy and timeless.

    in my post above, i initially went into some detail regarding monitoring the water content of your soil... but i then deleted it thinking it was too much and too pedantic, and too... know-it-all sounding? but ill get into that again a little bit here.

    first. not having rain for some days does not mean you are not still getting saturated ground water flows near the surface.

    keep in mind im not talking about the static(more or less), ground water levels that your water wells pump from. im talking about the surface water percolating from rainfall higher up on your watershed slowly mingling down through the soil.

    its impossible to REALLY know the hydraulic gradient or hydraulic behavior of water flowing down that hillside without getting boreholes taken, and hiring a fancy geotechnical specialist ... and im 100% NOT suggesting you do that. but you can get a rough idea of what is happening by using some instruments and test methods.

    before you do anything, again, i really think you should speak with your neighbors having a similar house at a similar elevation...namely concrete footings at a similar depth. free clues are the best clues... my old materials professor used to lament the fact that roadway designers would never actually visit the existing roadways being expanded or reconditioned or otherwise upgraded... seeing one isolated section of pavement fail is one thing... but seeing uniform or patterns of failure is a different thing entirely, and means a reevaulation of the site conditions and design are merited.

    after you do that... rule out stupid things like leaking water supply assuming you have city and not well water. you can literally just shut off the house cold water supply, and look at your water meter. most modern nutating disk types will read flows that are exceptionally low... like small fractions of a single gpm. you should also make sure your sewer system is not leaking. i THINK you can hire a plumber to do this? at least this test is done on new construction in alot of cases... i honestly do not know exactly how they do it, so you might look into it yourself, or atleast rule it out if the sewer system does not extend along that wall.

    after that i would look to verify you have HYDROSTATIC pressure against this wall, and not capillary wicking up through the slab or foundation wall footings. from the sounds of it ... IE water leaking visibly through a crack? it sounds like its some amount of hydrostatic pressure wich is fairly bad im afraid to say.

    basically your wall will have 2 major forces things acting on it laterally... earth pressure (largest of the two) and hydrostatic pressure. your wall is really only engineered to resist the earth pressure. concrete is highly prone to minor shrinkage cracking unless heavily reinfoced with large amounts of steel. you also get water comeing up through key ways, and through any penetrations in the wall itself that are not properly waterproofed. obiviously outright crackign from settlement or inward bowing will also cause leaks in concrete. basically concrete is hard to make waterproof for long periods of time... i could show you some rebar schedules and wet curing and mixture specs for concrete waste water treatment basins that would make your head explode lol.

    if you can establish hydrostatic pressure by simply tracing the water back to the source crack or penetration that would clue you in right there... but it could also be below your poured over slab.

    if you cannot establish hydrostatic pressure as the issue, one test you can do is called a calcium chloride test.. basically you buy a little test kit with a chart. the kit contains some known amount of calcium chloride in a little plastic petri dish along with an air tight container that you seal or tape to the foundation wall or slab.

    the amount of weight gain in the calcium chloride will give you a figure that you can contrast with different areas of your slab.

    if you are just getting capillary moisture moving upwards into the walls and slab-and then condensing on cool surfaces, the test should be more or less uniform along the exterior wall in question with the figures dropping off along walls with less depth in the ground. there are also digital instruments that you can use, but im assuming they cost too much.

    there is not much you can do about real bad capillary moisture without pumping down the surface water table around your slab via interior or exterior waterproofing retrofits. moderate capillary moisture can be dealt with by certain wall system that allow for more agressive drying to the interior space, some chemical treatments, and maby even by some specialty coatings... but bad issues are in a different league.

    you should also consider examining the soil in and around this wall.

    there is an instrument called a soil tensiometer that can measure water content in soils by correlating with water tension with high tension indicating relative dryness, and very low tension indicating saturation or near saturation. the problem with the tensiometers is that they are a) sort of expensive... at least 100 bucks for a smaller one, and b) a bit finicky as they require a little hand pump to calibrate properly... and they do require periodic calibrations.

    you could also just post hole in a few areas and try and determine the ground water level, percolation rate and recharge rate.... problem here is the hole will probably collapse rapidly if yo have real saturated non coheisve sandy soil. in this case you could try ramming or auguring a perforated pvc pipe into the soil and removing the spoil by jetting it with water... but good luck with that if you have ANY roots or ANY rocks in the soil. i guess you could you could also dig a post hole and backfill around a pvc pipe... but the problem tthere is you would be effecting the distribution of all the virgin soil and would probably effect the recharge rate to some small extent... but idk.

    anyway good luck with all this.i think if you take a diligent and methodical approach to determining what the source of water is and quantifying it... you could at least save your self from spending alot of money on solutions that would end up failing or performing badly.

  16. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
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    Looking at your pictures...

    I would figure out a way to remove some of the wood paneling behind the 2x4's and have a look-see what is back there... hope you find a couple inch space with a block wall behind it... AND... a nice solid slab at the bottom!

    I cannot stress enough: Get the roof water AWAY from the house with proper gutters!
    Before I became an HVAC guy... did remodeling and handy stuff...
    Getting the roof water AWAY from the house solved most of the issues most of the time.
    Good place to start.

    In the big picture... you are probably gonna end up digging up that wall on the west side all the way to the footer below the slab (do not dig to the bottom of the footer... ).... and sealing the wall... then installing a french drain along there.

    Keep us informed as you go... interesting stuff!
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    GA's basic rules of home heating and AC upgrades:
    *Installation is more important than the brand of equipment
    *The duct system keeps the house comfortable; the equipment only heats and cools (and dehumidifies)
    *Cheap is not good, good is not cheap; however expensive is not a guarantee of quality!
    Choose your contractor wisely!

  17. #26
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ft. Worth, TX
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    I hope you don't mind if I resized the pictures so they are easier to see. I will take them down at once if you want me to. A friend here in TX had this problem, and what solved it was putting drain tile all around the house down at the level of the foundation. Of course here in Ft. Worth, TX everything is flat.







    No one is useless in this world who lightens the burdens of another. -- Charles Dickens

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