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  1. #27
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    I put the picture in my album.
    Retired, after 43 Years

  2. #28
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    Just happen to have an international plumbing code book handy. 1002.4 Trap Seals: Each trap shall have a liquid seal not less than than 2 inched and no more than 4 inches. Pretty sure the uniform code book say something very simialr The trap is assembled incorrectly. Yes deep traps can be used in special situation but this is not a special situation. Cut the tail piece, flip the horizontal arm around and trim the end off will take a whole 5 minutes to fix

  3. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Answer-Man View Post
    Yes deep traps can be used in special situation but this is not a special situation.
    This was determined, how?

  4. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    Sir,

    It is my position that, in the second pic from the top - the non-U piece is attached incorrectly. With it's ends switched.

    Here; I'll try to just include that one pic - wish me luck.

    PHM
    -----------
    PHM, you are right, that sh!t is just bass-ackwards. The coned end is meant to be crushed by the nut and the threaded end is meant to have a coned gasket.


    If thinking was easy,
    everyone would do it!


    Regarding Russian Roulette; five out of six players think it is a safe, enjoyable game!

    "And I've been banned twice. What of it? If you aren't getting banned once every 3 years, you aren't trying." Brian8383

    "it's actually 90 right now in this shaded area of satan's butthole." - HVAC_marc

    “Don't believe signature quotes.” - George Washington

  5. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcstl View Post
    PHM, you are right, that sh!t is just bass-ackwards. The coned end is meant to be crushed by the nut and the threaded end is meant to have a coned gasket.
    there is little difference between the fixed coned end and the movable gasket end. both get squeezed by the compression nut, hence the term compression joint. the difference in the sealing surface is ONLY that one is molded and one is a separate piece.

  6. #32
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    Look I'm not arguing that a deep trap can't be used in special situations. The OP stated he's not a plumber and is very inexperienced in doing this type of work. You even said yourself deep traps cause more problems.... The OP assembled it wrong.

    As to your question:
    As deisgned and provided for in the manufactures installation recommendations for the appliance. Manufacturer directions are the only thing that allows me to deviate from the printed code. In my area when the inspection is done the inspector will make a note in the property file record for future reference. I'll accept I'm wrong but based on code documentation or manufactures instruction. If you can provide either please do, then we will all learn something new.

    Good luck time to go home

  7. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Answer-Man View Post
    Look I'm not arguing that a deep trap can't be used in special situations. The OP stated he's not a plumber and is very inexperienced in doing this type of work. You even said yourself deep traps cause more problems.... The OP assembled it wrong.

    As to your question:
    As deisgned and provided for in the manufactures installation recommendations for the appliance. Manufacturer directions are the only thing that allows me to deviate from the printed code. In my area when the inspection is done the inspector will make a note in the property file record for future reference. I'll accept I'm wrong but based on code documentation or manufactures instruction. If you can provide either please do, then we will all learn something new.

    Good luck time to go home
    I was just curious how we determined that it wasnt a special situation. I think the other specific forums (plumbing, electrical) should be regulated like AOP because, like this situation, it's DIY and codes differ everywhere.

    Deep traps tend to leak. Mainly because the compression nuts are rarely tight enough.

    The OP's biggest issue was not cutting down the basket connector, which dropped the trap too far, and the angle was wrong.

    We are all trying to help (and in my case, pointing out some other views). I have no issue with you.

  8. #34
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    Well . . . . the end with the 90º bend in it is a union-nut joint - and the other end is a slip-nut joint. That is at least a Little difference. <g>

    PHM
    ----------




    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    there is little difference between the fixed coned end and the movable gasket end. both get squeezed by the compression nut, hence the term compression joint. the difference in the sealing surface is ONLY that one is molded and one is a separate piece.
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  9. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    Well . . . . the end with the 90º bend in it is a union-nut joint - and the other end is a slip-nut joint. That is at least a Little difference. <g>

    PHM
    ----------
    like i said, one is fixed, the other is not. the joint has the same angle of seal, same connection type, same function.

  10. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    like i said, one is fixed, the other is not. the joint has the same angle of seal, same connection type, same function.
    Different materials, different compressibility. It will generally be user error. I like the ones that are covered with silicone, or plumbers putty and still leak until they call me. haha. I think the prime reason here was the bad angle.


    If thinking was easy,
    everyone would do it!


    Regarding Russian Roulette; five out of six players think it is a safe, enjoyable game!

    "And I've been banned twice. What of it? If you aren't getting banned once every 3 years, you aren't trying." Brian8383

    "it's actually 90 right now in this shaded area of satan's butthole." - HVAC_marc

    “Don't believe signature quotes.” - George Washington

  11. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcstl View Post
    Different materials, different compressibility. It will generally be user error. I like the ones that are covered with silicone, or plumbers putty and still leak until they call me. haha. I think the prime reason here was the bad angle.
    the worst is flex seal or home depot epoxy. i had to deal with epoxy the other day. on a water line. i had to chisel the epoxy off, then it took literally 15 seconds to braze over the split.

  12. #38
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    "he worst is flex seal or home depot epoxy. i had to deal with epoxy the other day. on a water line. i had to chisel the epoxy off,"

    Geez, what an idiot, everyone knows you're supposed to use JB Weld.
    Retired, after 43 Years

  13. #39
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    HVAC-Marc no offense taken and none ment.

    You are 100% correct while the International and Uniform codes what in the books are the same everywhere, but they are interpeted and enforced differently throughout the whole contry. Just as an example these plastic drain pieces we are talking about. In my home area are illegal for me as a licensed Plumbing Contractor to install any of those parts. I must use Bronze, Bronze with chrome plating or I can use schedule 40 PVC and it must be glued joints. I am allowed only 3 slip joint for any trap. That's just the way this city has decided to enforce the code, next city over could care less

    We make decisions and determination on what we believe something is based on the pictures and what is written in every post. I can write something and think I have made absolutely crytal clear. Then you get a response totaly from left field, like where in the heck did you get that idea from. As for this application I see a copper drain stub with a standard laundry drain and a clothes washer next to it. looks like a thousand other laundry tubs I've seen in a residential application

  14. Likes HVAC_Marc liked this post
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