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  1. #14
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    Being a former instructor I would want to cover temperature scales, btu's, etc... I would also have a section on motors and motor controls. Probably should throw in some fire alarm shutdowns for good measure.
    Law Of The Thermostat: He who has the thermostat wins!!!!!

  2. #15
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    what I think is a great idea is once hired and what ever software the company predominantly uses, have a course already in place of programming projects starting very simple and advancing slowly , like labs , small assignments etc Im sure some companies have something like this already.
    Keep it simple to keep it cool!

  3. #16
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    Dec 2016
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    Thread Starter
    Thank you to everyone for all of the feedback.

    The intent of this "video course" was to provide foundational knowledge that can then be viewed again and again. It would be supported with exercises and with discussion boards.

    I'm going to be fully transparent. I don't know if I buy into the it takes 6 months to learn something and the they need to be doing it for X years philosphy. Maybe it's because I'm younger, some would call me a millenial (I'm right on the edge of that age range).

    But when I think back to much of the training I've gotten (HVAC, BAS, IT, Cyber security, Financies, you name it). There were only a couple things I absolutely needed to know.

    I'm a firm believer in the Paretto prinicple (the theory is that 80% of your results come from 20% of your tasks).

    My challenge as an instructor will be to narrow down on that 20% and eliminate all the fluff while also not teaching in a way that assumes knowledge.

    It will be interesting, maybe it's my own naviety because I am largely self taught, but I believe someone could learn most of this stuff over a couple weeks if they focused and had a solid framework/plan.

    That being said as I move closer to having the course I will be looking for folks to provide feedback.

    I've been working on creating an online business focused on teaching BAS to folks and just wrote a book on BAS so this course will be a naturally continuation of my book/blog/podcast.

  4. #17
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    Dec 2016
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by simux View Post
    Being a former instructor I would want to cover temperature scales, btu's, etc... I would also have a section on motors and motor controls. Probably should throw in some fire alarm shutdowns for good measure.
    I agree with understanding Temperature scales from a resistance perspective but when you say BTU what are you refering to? And when you say motor controls outside the VFD and Contactors what would you be looking for?

  5. #18
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    Dec 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cagey57 View Post
    philzito,
    Since you posted it in the Controls Section I am guessing you are referring to a "Basic" Controls Technician.
    That, Sir, is a very ambitious outline. I agree with most of the other comments.

    I would add, to your week 1 items (which will probably take 4 weeks min. to cover all that info) 2 things:
    1. Basic Math skills. Needed for electrical, Flow, etc. concepts.
    2. Basic Physics. Needed in Pressure, Temperature, Humidity, heat transfer concepts.

    I wish you all luck in the world. Please post a link when you get some of this finalized. I think you may be doing the industry a service if you put it together right.

    I hope you are going to put a reasonable price tag on your endeavor, don't give it away but keep it affordable so the people that may be interested can "Test the waters" without spending a fortune and then find out it's not their cup of tea.
    Out of curiosity, would it be to much of an assumption to assume fundamental math skills and thermodynamics knowledge?

    I've done a ton of work in the BAS world and besides for fractions, cubes, and squares there's not much more than that. Plus you can plug most things into engineeringtoolbox.com if you have complex calcs.

  6. #19
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    Dec 2016
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    It took nine months eight hours a day to cover that at the school I went to.
    Interesting, was that because your instructor had to keep pace with slower students? Was there extra stuff covered? Was the content presented poorly? Just curious what took so long?

  7. #20
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    May 2014
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    The school started from zero and turned out techs who could get and keep jobs at a higher rate than 'graduates' from any other school in the country. As a simple example, my first job [back in 83 I think] I started at $5 an hour. Then within few years was at journeyman pay, and was able to buy a house and new car five years after I graduated.

    It was every students job to keep up with the class. There was no slowing down for someone who didn't care.

    There is a lot to this trade. Or, at least, there can be. Depending on the opportunities that you create for yourself.


    Quote Originally Posted by philzito View Post
    Interesting, was that because your instructor had to keep pace with slower students? Was there extra stuff covered? Was the content presented poorly? Just curious what took so long?

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  9. #21
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    Jan 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by philzito View Post
    I don't know if I buy into the it takes 6 months to learn something and the they need to be doing it for X years philosphy.
    Good thing there are set minimums in the world....

    My heart surgeon with his 6 month cert, got 20% of my transplant right and I'm only 80% alive now.... hmmm any takers on half price transplants?

    In 20yrs I have never seen a new guy jump in and 6 months latter be useful at much of anything without constant baby sitting. If you can pull that off, you got a gold mine. Good luck and let us know how it turns out.
    Propagating the formula. http://www.noagendashow.com/

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  11. #22
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    Dec 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by orion242 View Post
    Good thing there are set minimums in the world....

    My heart surgeon with his 6 month cert, got 20% of my transplant right and I'm only 80% alive now.... hmmm any takers on half price transplants?

    In 20yrs I have never seen a new guy jump in and 6 months latter be useful at much of anything without constant baby sitting. If you can pull that off, you got a gold mine. Good luck and let us know how it turns out.
    Interesting perspective but I think heart surgery and BAS are a tad bit different (just a tad... ;-] ).

    That being said, I just have this feeling, maybe it's youthful ignorance, maybe it stems from my ADHD mind and is the side effects of years of self-study.. but I feel that if a person has the right foundations they can be taught what they need to contribute within a few weeks.

    After all, in my experience, the biggest washout period of new techs is the first 6 months because often times they are put on a job with very little training and high expectations.

    My thoughts are if I can teach the following a new technician will be good for at least a year at which point they can come back for more advanced training (gotta have a source of revenue :-] ).

    Here is what I think a new tech needs to know:
    • The fundamentals of HVAC (Airflow, heat transfer)
    • Identify HVAC devices
    • Common HVAC sequences (VAV's, RTU's, AHU's, Exhaust fans, Fan coils, Simple Chiller Plants)
    • BAS Architecture
    • Electrical fundamentals (wiring, transformers, resistance, relays, reading electrical schematics)
    • Reading and updating construction documents
    • IT (Fundamentals of networks, IP addresses, subneting, how networking works)
    • PC abilities (setting IP addresses, basic troubleshooting)
    • Installing devices (sensors, controllers, trunks, etc)


    There will be vendor specific skills how to create graphics, upload controllers, etc, but that will be taught in the vendor class.

    I appreciate your thoughts and feedback. I am really passionate about closing the gap we have with qualified techs in the BAS space and I love to teach...

    -Phil

  12. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by philzito View Post
    I am really passionate about closing the gap we have with qualified techs in the BAS space and I love to teach...
    I think your optimistic, still could be a great intro course for new hires. Look forward to seeing a teaser. Maybe its something we toss new hires at.
    Keep us up to date.
    Propagating the formula. http://www.noagendashow.com/

  13. #24
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    Dec 2016
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    We will take a motivated hard worker with mechanical competency over a 6 month wonder, or even a grizzly expert, every time.

    Am watching what you come up with though. Could be good follow on training after they serve their time as a helper.

    Sent from my SM-N915T using Tapatalk

  14. #25
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    Dec 2016
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    Thread Starter
    Thanks for all the feedback. I'm planning on standing up a membership site in lieu of a course as I think that will help more folks. Think of pluralaight for BAS.

  15. #26
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    Sep 2006
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    It's really important to know how a motor control center works. The controls person normally gets to a building where the fans or pumps are not running. To understand how these motor control centers are wired is really important. Especially with fire alarm shutdowns, timers, phase monitors etc...
    Law Of The Thermostat: He who has the thermostat wins!!!!!

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