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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    The Conclusion -

    I decided to re-brick the little bastard as I originally intended. But I left the side-refractory panels and bricked over them. The floor panel just had some divots out of it which I filled with furnace cement. The rear was was a POS so I threw it away and made an expanded-metal replacement. The same size left & right and with a lip bent backwards the depth of the original panel. To duplicate the air-space which the original panels had.

    The expanded-metal replacement was then bricked over - with the furnace cement 'keying' into the diamond holes.

    Afterwards I dusted the interior with flat black hi-heat BBQ / exhaust manifold paint to make it all look the same inside the fireplace as it had previously. Rather than wait for it to soot up again. <g>

    I'll see if I can manage some pics in a minute here.
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    Thread Starter

    Or would never be better than late ?

    You reminded me that I promised pics.

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    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    Thread Starter
    I made a new expanded-metal bit to attach the rear bricking to but the battered side panels I left as-is and re-bricked over them.

    Narrowing the firebox width by 2" - but no one notices.

    The bottom panel I just 'repaired' with furnace cement and left it - with the idea that it would soon covered with ashes and so forth.

    The replacement panels were something like $500. as I recall, and some weeks to get them. This re-build job was about $100. Well; unless you add in the million dollars worth of talent I utilized. <g>

    The rebuilt fireplace was subsequently used pretty much every cool day since then and the building didn't burn down. Well; yet anyway. <g>
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

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