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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
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    Pacific NW coast HRV and/or central dehumidifier

    I'm building a new home that is about 40yds from Puget Sound. It will have higher than code air sealing and so I'm going to install a HRV unit with dedicated intake and outtake vents (ie separate from the forced air heating). I'm concerned about interior humidity as I have another home 100 yards away that has high interior humidity. I use a portable dehumidifier with a hose to a drain to control the humidity in that house. I'm trying to decide if it's worth also installing a central dehumidifier as well as the HRV unit.

    Dew point average varies between 40.5F in Jan and 57.8F in August according to my weather station. Average outside humidity is 97.5% in Jan to 77.4% in July

    Any advice is highly appreciated!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
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    40,762
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    Teddy Bear should be around with great advice. How about a ventilating whole house dehum?

    http://www.ultra-aire.com/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
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    Thread Starter
    BaldLoonie, thank you for the reply.

    I was thinking of the Ultra-Aire XT205H as an option if I need a central dehumidifier. I guess I could use it with a fresh air intake instead of the HRV but I'd have to put in six extractor fans for the bathrooms and laundry room and a make up device as they could de-pressurize the house too much. At that point I'm guessing I'm not saving much over the HRV.

    Looking forward to Teddy Bear's thoughts!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
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    Good issue worthy of discussion. I will post Monday because of time limitations today.
    How many sq. ft. of living space? How air tight is the home, type of insulation? Number of occupants?
    Regards Teddy Bear
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
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    Sounds like a nice part of the world. It is a mild climate which reduces the benefit of a HRV. This type of fresh air ventilation reduces the heat needed to heat and cool the home. In northern MN, the benefit of an HRV is significant. In NW coastal, not so much. Might be <$100 per year.
    But as you know, coastal climates have a lot of moisture but are mild.

    Providing make-up air for all of the your exhaust devices, like the kitchen hood, bath fans, and clothes drier, slow moisture loaded air from being sucked in through your walls.
    A small house dehumidifier with the fresh air option, will provide fresh, filtered air when occupied. Also, the unit will circulate the fresh air and maintain the set %RH throughout the home. The cost of the dehu is about the same as the HRV. Check out the Ultra-Aire system, the old timer of the systems.
    Keep us posted on other questions and the size of the home.
    Regards Teddy Bear
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

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