Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    1
    Post Likes

    Heating with a hot water well

    We are lucky enough to have a cabin with two hot water wells (consistently 120f hot year round) and one cold water well (cold in the spring, but by mid summer/fall it is ~100f, which means it isn't much good for cooling in the summer).

    Currently the cabin is only used in the summer because there is no heat inside other than a wood stove. Without some heat the pipes will freeze so we winterize and don't use the cabin once freezing temperatures start.

    We would like to setup an open loop system, which is pretty common in this area. Pumping water out of the ground and using radiant heat, then injecting the water back into the second well. The wells were originally permitted and drilled with this intent by a previous owner, but the system was never built (no piping to the cabin was put in, just a hose bib on the pump we use to heat a hot tub).

    The cabin is about 1800 sq feet 2 story plus about 800 sq feet basement (just a dirt floor). It was built in the 80's with 2x6 walls and is fairly well insulated with good windows.

    We want to do the install ourselves because I have a background in construction, and it's nearly impossible to get a geothermal HVAC contractor in the next year or so because of a construction boom, and a limited number of contractors in the area, so they are very expensive.

    My though is to use fan assisted hydronic radiators and eventually in floor radiant heat in the basement (it's just dirt now, we plan to finish it at some point).

    The pump puts out a good 7 gpm with a 1" PEX pipe.

    I'm having a hard time finding information about this sort of system because most of my google searches bring up geothermal loops + a heat pump or radiant with a hot water heater. I have a very hard time finding info about systems with hot water wells. So I'm concerned I'll spend a bunch of time and money and end up with an inadequate system. The main goal is to prevent freezing and at least heat the cabin to a basic level so we can use the wood stove to supplement when we are there.

    Does anyone here have any experience with a system like this, or advice about this plan?

    Thanks everyone!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Billington Heights, NY
    Posts
    21,628
    Post Likes
    Id approach it like this -

    find your average water temperature. then figure out the radiant heating method and layout that makes it work. the source of the heat - the well, a wood burner or a gas boiler makes no difference.

  3. Likes throrope liked this post
  4. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold, NY
    Posts
    24,447
    Post Likes
    The biggest problem is what happens when the power goes out!

    You should get an engineer involved i dont thing 7 gpm of 120*f water will be enough.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Dayton Oh
    Posts
    1,911
    Post Likes
    I would think a water source heat pump would be the way to go.

    If the line from the wells is buried there would be a minimum fear of freezing, and even in winter most dirt floor basements stay above freezing.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Dayton Oh
    Posts
    1,911
    Post Likes
    Also I would think you would get a better btu/gallon then just a fan over a radiant coil


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold, NY
    Posts
    24,447
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by jbhenergy View Post
    I would think a water source heat pump would be the way to go.

    If the line from the wells is buried there would be a minimum fear of freezing, and even in winter most dirt floor basements stay above freezing.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I agree with that but the unoccupied periods are my concern.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Dayton Oh
    Posts
    1,911
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by pecmsg View Post
    I agree with that but the unoccupied periods are my concern.
    agreed.

    my dad has a place in rural athens ohio that we use for a hunting retreat. Every time we go down in the winter we have to spend a good hour winterizing everything.

    there is an oil well on the property, so as a perk, he is able to get free natural gas off of it. might be the one and only time i think it pays not to upgrade lol.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Altmar, New York, United States
    Posts
    6,673
    Post Likes
    how far will the water have to travel from well to indoor equipment? I think for radiant you could be ok but 120 degree water is kind of on the bubble for a fan coil.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    7,381
    Post Likes
    radiant would likely be the best use of such cool water. that said, here is a chart comparing heat output of baseboard using different water temps. http://www.builditsolar.com/Projects...dOutput327.pdf

    here is some low temp baseboard, but again low heat output with such low water temps. http://designlineonline.com/pdf/ther...d-brochure.pdf

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Central Ohio
    Posts
    102
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Bentley View Post
    We are lucky enough to have a cabin with two hot water wells (consistently 120f hot year round) and one cold water well (cold in the spring, but by mid summer/fall it is ~100f, which means it isn't much good for cooling in the summer).

    Currently the cabin is only used in the summer because there is no heat inside other than a wood stove. Without some heat the pipes will freeze so we winterize and don't use the cabin once freezing temperatures start.

    We would like to setup an open loop system, which is pretty common in this area. Pumping water out of the ground and using radiant heat, then injecting the water back into the second well. The wells were originally permitted and drilled with this intent by a previous owner, but the system was never built (no piping to the cabin was put in, just a hose bib on the pump we use to heat a hot tub).

    The cabin is about 1800 sq feet 2 story plus about 800 sq feet basement (just a dirt floor). It was built in the 80's with 2x6 walls and is fairly well insulated with good windows.

    We want to do the install ourselves because I have a background in construction, and it's nearly impossible to get a geothermal HVAC contractor in the next year or so because of a construction boom, and a limited number of contractors in the area, so they are very expensive.

    My though is to use fan assisted hydronic radiators and eventually in floor radiant heat in the basement (it's just dirt now, we plan to finish it at some point).

    The pump puts out a good 7 gpm with a 1" PEX pipe.

    I'm having a hard time finding information about this sort of system because most of my google searches bring up geothermal loops + a heat pump or radiant with a hot water heater. I have a very hard time finding info about systems with hot water wells. So I'm concerned I'll spend a bunch of time and money and end up with an inadequate system. The main goal is to prevent freezing and at least heat the cabin to a basic level so we can use the wood stove to supplement when we are there.

    Does anyone here have any experience with a system like this, or advice about this plan?

    Thanks everyone!
    Where are you located?

    The problem here is the times without electric. You will still have a shut down, start up that you will need to do.
    I would design a system with the hot water as pre feed for a hot water tank supplying the system in an ordinary fashion except dumping into an open loop.
    OR... set up a large buried storage tank with a heat exchanger to a closed loop with antifreeze

    Sent from my SM-N915T using Tapatalk

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Northern NV
    Posts
    1,885
    Post Likes
    Power outage for a small pump is easily handled with some deep cycle batteries and an inverter.

    "Radiant" panels would be the best (IMHO) use of this 120F water. Wish I had this! Some of my townsfolk do...

    GSHP will NOT like 120F feed water. They are built to take in water between 15 to 60F. Plus now you are using more energy than you need and a battery backup would be exorbitant.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •