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  1. #1
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    Carbon Monoxide Detector

    I have a Fluke CO220 that I've had for several years. Still works, but I'd like to pick up another. The FP SCM4 looks OK, claims to be fast enough for walk-around detection and tracking the CO source. Also reasonably priced. Any opinions on this or a better one?

  2. #2
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    Just subscribing. Heating season is almost upon us. I'll need a CO detector also.
    It's an upside down world we live in.

  3. #3
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    Jan 2002
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    All of our techs use detectors made by a company called Sensorcon. It's primary function is safety, in terms of audible and visual alerts when entering a space with elevated CO levels. However you can order them as a kit that comes with a hand pump for flue testing. They are set up so you can calibrate them yourself. Calibrate and change the battery every six months, and the detector will last at least 2 years before the sensor wears out.

    They also have really good service, and an exchange program for when the detector wears out.

    There are 3 different models, and I think they are all reasonably priced.

    www.sensorcon.com

    Hi, my name is Glenn, and I'm a Toolaholic!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glenn Harrison View Post
    All of our techs use detectors made by a company called Sensorcon. It's primary function is safety, in terms of audible and visual alerts when entering a space with elevated CO levels. However you can order them as a kit that comes with a hand pump for flue testing. They are set up so you can calibrate them yourself. Calibrate and change the battery every six months, and the detector will last at least 2 years before the sensor wears out.

    They also have really good service, and an exchange program for when the detector wears out.

    There are 3 different models, and I think they are all reasonably priced.

    www.sensorcon.com
    Reasonably priced, too. I've put these on the research list. I like the Time Weighted Average function. I've just discovered the the FP doesn't allow for air-stream detection, which makes it useless to me. The Sensorcon strikes me as space detection only also.

    The area measurement could be useful, but my primary usage would mainly be to verify CO in the furnace air flow....demonstrably pinpoint the source for the customer.

  5. #5
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    For CO in airflow, I just use my combustion meter. I have a personal one like the one above clipped on me when I walk in. Started that when I bought the farm. Walked into a Pizza shop, went down the basement (heater off), but didn't realize there was 2 natural draft gas hot water heaters around the corner. The vent fans for the pizza ovens/cooktop were back drafting CO from them into the basement. So now I wear it every time.
    If I do a job in 30 minutes it's because I spent 30 years learning how to do that in 30 minutes. You owe me for the years, not the minutes.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by vin lashon View Post
    Reasonably priced, too. I've put these on the research list. I like the Time Weighted Average function. I've just discovered the the FP doesn't allow for air-stream detection, which makes it useless to me. The Sensorcon strikes me as space detection only also.

    The area measurement could be useful, but my primary usage would mainly be to verify CO in the furnace air flow....demonstrably pinpoint the source for the customer.
    I've had so few times where I have measured CO in the air stream, that I don't even think about it. I figure if it's in the air stream, it's also in the stagnant air.

    However I don't see any reason why you couldn't measure air flow using the hand pump.

    Placing the meter directly over a supply register, I would think that would be OK, but I would get Sensorcon's blessing on that one.
    Hi, my name is Glenn, and I'm a Toolaholic!

  7. #7
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    I have a Honeywell Analytics IAQ Probe T, RH, CO, CO2, Datalogger, IAQ-4-DL

    I got a great deal on mine and seems to work fine..


    little pricy I suppose..

    http://www.jjstech.com/iaq-4-dl.html
    "I never lie because I don't fear anyone. You only lie when you're afraid." - John Gotti

    “Always shoot first . . . that way they know you’re armed!” - Orrin Porter Rockwell

    "Individuals and entities performing contracting work illegally and without a license place the public at risk and effectively steal millions from Arizona's hardworking, law-abiding contractors and their employees," - Jeff Fleetham, director of the Arizona Registrar of Contractors.

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  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glenn Harrison View Post
    I've had so few times where I have measured CO in the air stream, that I don't even think about it. I figure if it's in the air stream, it's also in the stagnant air.

    However I don't see any reason why you couldn't measure air flow using the hand pump.

    Placing the meter directly over a supply register, I would think that would be OK, but I would get Sensorcon's blessing on that one.
    Living in this climate, we don't put much burden on our furnaces. But having spent some time this evening reading up on proper CO detection, checking the air stream isn't really the way to go. The levels are too low and inconsistent, having mixed with the supply air. I still have a lot of reading to do, but checking the stack and the area seems to be the preferred method. I've been placing my fluke under the register or over a drain stack.

    I may have been premature in asking for a recommendation, since it turns out that I have a lot to learn (that's been a recurring revelation since I joined this forum).

    I still don't mind hearing what others are using and what their process is, though. Here's a link I found educational. I think this guy may be a member here:

    How not to find cracked heat exchangers

    The FP SCM4 I mentioned earlier doesn't have the ability to check stack flue gases. Area only.

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by HellGato View Post
    I have a Honeywell Analytics IAQ Probe T, RH, CO, CO2, Datalogger, IAQ-4-DL

    I got a great deal on mine and seems to work fine..


    little pricy I suppose..

    http://www.jjstech.com/iaq-4-dl.html
    Yeah, just a little. I don't think that'll be the one I get. Hey, if you're looking to upgrade, you could spend up to $4000 for this one. It includes a velocity probe.

    I was looking at this Bacharach a few minutes ago. A bit more than I thought of paying, but looks pretty attractive compared to what you paid.

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  12. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by vin lashon View Post
    Yeah, just a little. I don't think that'll be the one I get. Hey, if you're looking to upgrade, you could spend up to $4000 for this one. It includes a velocity probe.

    I was looking at this Bacharach a few minutes ago. A bit more than I thought of paying, but looks pretty attractive compared to what you paid.
    That one looks good to me .. when it comes to professional equipment you get what you pay for and some things have to be accurate and you can trust them..
    "I never lie because I don't fear anyone. You only lie when you're afraid." - John Gotti

    “Always shoot first . . . that way they know you’re armed!” - Orrin Porter Rockwell

    "Individuals and entities performing contracting work illegally and without a license place the public at risk and effectively steal millions from Arizona's hardworking, law-abiding contractors and their employees," - Jeff Fleetham, director of the Arizona Registrar of Contractors.

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  14. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by HellGato View Post
    That one looks good to me .. when it comes to professional equipment you get what you pay for and some things have to be accurate and you can trust them..
    Your climate doesn't seem to need much heating. Get much use out of that Honeywell?

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  16. #12
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    For finding the souce of CO I use my combustion analyzer. You probably only need a basic model like a Bacharach Intech. But I do a TON of combustion work in boiler rooms and everywhere else, so I have a personal CO monitor that stays on my tool bag its on 24/7 its made by Honeywell and is called a Toxi pro. It alarms and vibrates. When it does its time to ventilate, and leave the area and turn off the gas outside until things settle, then investigate with the CA. Or get the fire dept. involved.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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  18. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by vin lashon View Post
    Your climate doesn't seem to need much heating. Get much use out of that Honeywell?
    actually I do since it measures Oxygen levels too for OSA and comfort control.. I had one place a dog groomers who were using the dryer which was electric and venting it back inside the shop instead of out the vent due to the "plumber expert" who could not clear the vent and told them was not to code..

    The heat pump was clogged with dog hair and not working and iced up as well for long time..

    too hot and humid in there..

    complaints of headaches and ect ect

    the honeywell was excellent to demonstrate my repairs and effects on the IAQ ..

    We have alot of Gas items here as well in Arizona, even though is warmer in the winter..

    was a great purchase
    "I never lie because I don't fear anyone. You only lie when you're afraid." - John Gotti

    “Always shoot first . . . that way they know you’re armed!” - Orrin Porter Rockwell

    "Individuals and entities performing contracting work illegally and without a license place the public at risk and effectively steal millions from Arizona's hardworking, law-abiding contractors and their employees," - Jeff Fleetham, director of the Arizona Registrar of Contractors.

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