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  1. #1
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    Jul 2016
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    Am I asking too much?

    If the following has been addressed before please let me know what post to look for and I'll be on my way.


    I have a Bryant 5 stage Evolution system and Connex thermostat. The house originally had a two zone system, one for an upstairs room over the garage, and another zone for the entire downstairs. I had the downstairs split into two zones so that we could isolate the master bedroom. The heat works like a charm. It's very quiet and the rooms are kept comfortable and quiet.
    Now that it is AC season I can't seem to get the bedroom to be as cool as I'd like it when we sleep. I start the programmed temp at 78 from 9am to 5pm when no one goes in there. At 5pm I lower the temp to 76 for when we go in and out for very short periods. I lower it to 70 at 9pm. We wander into bed around that time to about 10:30. I have one last change where I set the temperature down to about 64 after 11:30 so that it stays chilly when/if we stir during the night. It is rarely at 70 at 10pm and at 1am the temp is still at 67 degrees.
    My living room zone is set between 74 and 70 over the course of the day and I have the upstairs room over the garage set at 90 (practically off except for a few hours late in the day).
    If I'm asking it unreasonable things what should I be setting the temps at? My installer has suggested that I keep the non-bedroom zones no further than 4 degrees from the bedroom zone.
    I have tried setting the other two zones within 4 degrees of the bedroom temperature and I just can't stand the idea of the room over the garage running from about 3pm through the entire night because that room faces west and from 3pm on that room absolutely bakes and does not cool down much through the night. It also doesn't seem to help anyway. Whenever the contractor looks at my thermostat and sees a difference of more than a few degrees between zones further discussion becomes difficult because he says they just should not be set that differently. Am I really messing things up when I set the zones that far apart?
    Thanks In Advance,
    Pete

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    64 is probably colder than your system was designed for. For sure on a setback scenario.

  3. #3
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    Dec 2009
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    Leave it at 64 or go no more than 5 above

  4. #4
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    May 2000
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    Indianapolis, IN, USA
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    You're lucky you aren't freezing up the coil keeping it that cold!

  5. Likes kamersoutdoor liked this post
  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    nebraska
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    Yes you are. Very hard on both the system and the house to be running the AC that cold. Moisture will condense in the walls and lead to mold problems when the room temps are below outside dew points. Try 70 with a fan.

  7. Likes knave liked this post
  8. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
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    Thread Starter
    OK... Thanks! I had a suspicion that I was asking the system to do too much by bringing the bedroom that far down. Setting the thermostat to 70 or 68 will definitely bring it in line with the living room @ 70. When the thermostat says 70 in the living room/dining room/breakfast nook area it feels like a meat locker in that area, yet the bedroom zone feels like it should be cooler when the thermostat in there says 66 degrees at 3am.
    More stuff to discuss with the contractor.
    Thanks again!

  9. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Portland OR
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    Why are you setting rooms back to almost 90? Is it for energy savings, if so don't waste your time, with your system it probably costs you more to set back these zones. I always let customers know that zoning is NOT to save money and is only to increase comfort. We also recommend that setbacks are never more than 3 degrees and any time we are within a few degrees of design conditions we recommend no setbacks.
    I have 4 zones in my house. Three are set to 70 heating and 73 cooling and one is set to 65 heating and 75 cooling(basement that is not used).

    So yes you are asking to much of the system.
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  10. #8
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    Jul 2016
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    Thread Starter
    I can see keeping the two downstairs zones within a tight range. My problem is in having a zone on another floor set so that it will almost default to running continuously for 6 to 8 hours of the day in the summer when there will only be a person up there at most 12 to 18 hours in an entire week. Does keeping the third zone at that level affect the other two zones?

  11. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    Portland OR
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    Does that level have a return air? Unless you have a dampered off return air or no return air then your system is sucking in 90 degree air from that upper room and mixing it with the air from other areas. Yes your cooling that room a bit more but all your doing is pulling heat out of that room to cool anyway. I bet it saves you $4-5 a month at most to keep the room at 90 degrees. You said it was off except for a few hours late in the day, so does that mean that everyday it recovers from 90 to 74? If so you are really saving almost zero energy and possibly even using more energy than just keeping the room at 74 with a 5 stage system. Would you prefer your HVAC running at 20% of capacity(stage 1, not sure of actual percentages) for 10 hours or stage 5 for 2 hours? Would you rather drive your car 100 miles at 55 MPH or 100 miles at 200 MPH. Which one gets you better gas mileage, which one is more comfortable and which one puts less wear and tear on the car? Its the same with your HVAC system.
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  12. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
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    Thread Starter
    When I keep the office upstairs @ 90 it is at 90 all the time except for the 12 to 18 hours in the week that I am up there. On a normal day there is no recovery. On a normal day that room still "kicks in" for a few hours late in the afternoon into early evening, even set at 90. When it kicks in it is "cooling" that room to 90, otherwise it would be around 95 in that room. That room faces directly west and is bathed in direct sun from around 1pm until 8/9 pm this time of year.
    If I lower the thermostat in the upstairs room there will be weeks during this time of the year that that room will be calling for the system almost all day, into the night and early mornings on the hottest days. What affect will this have on the two downstairs zones when they call for AC? Assuming that those zones are set close to each other and they don't have massive set backs.

  13. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    64 is not realistic.
    90 is crazy.
    Zoned systems are designed to help keep temperatures even, not have to large differences.
    Keep in mind that all the returns are always open, so when you're trying to cool to 64, there is 90 degree air entering the system.
    "Hey Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort." And he says, "there won't be any money, but when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness." So I got that goin' for me, which is nice. - Carl Spackler

  14. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
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    Thread Starter
    So I see where your coming from about my settings being out of range for proper operation of the system. I've been monitoring my energy usage daily with an app from the energy co-op and I'll see what happens when I "normalize" my settings. I look forward to being more comfortable. The heat part of this learning curve was a lot easier to deal with!
    Thanks

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