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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Iowa
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    Oldest R22 Chiller

    Just trying to get a feel for what the average age and the oldest R22 chillers that are out in service. I have two I have been babying for many years they have been in service for 43 years. I have worked on them for about 29 years. These are rotary-screws, water cooled, flooded chillers. These chillers run 24/7 and we have 2 set windows per year to take them down (out of service) if necessary. They were retubed once in about 1993 due to a tube freeze. New replacement compressors have not been available since 1991. These are Dunham Bush "Hartford" machines.

    I'm seeing signs that there could be refrigerant leakage across the tube to tube sheet joint (rolled joint with no annular grooves) into the condenser cooling water. I'm guessing I need to have a discussion with the owner about retubing (as rerolling has not worked in the past). Plugging the tube(s) does not stop the leak between the tube to tube sheet What they really need to do is consider replacing the old with new. But the owners have about 5000 pounds of R22 stockpiled. One of my selling points for the new is they can sell the R22 for a nice profit

    What is out there with respect to age for the machines you see.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold, NY
    Posts
    25,714
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    If you want to convince the owners show them the Kw / h of the old and replacements. Along with incentives from your electrical supplier, DOE and tax write offs 5 year ROI average

  3. Likes Fan Curve liked this post
  4. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    547
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    Wow! I have not seen a Dunham Bush since 2K Lost it when a MFG facility moved it's operation to another state. For my stuff you are the oldest by 18 years.
    I would do some math on that R22. Who bought it for them originally? Let them know that between energy saving, selling the R22 they might just payback
    in ????? years or less. you know your numbers. It sounds like those machines have done their job. How critical are they to the operation? If the entire facility halts
    or people are uncomfortable for a little while. That also adds a little incentive.
    I know from personal experience that you can keep anything alive. Custom make anything, Have a 100 ton box car from the 1964 era. Still going to this day but finally due to replace it
    in the spring of next year! I have rebuilt just about everything on this unit. Fan housings, coils, condensers, condensate pans, the guys did not care how much money it cost
    just rebuild it. It was all 100% tax deductible. I finally found a rebate and energy saving that out weighed the tax write off.
    Last edited by Fan Curve; 11-16-2015 at 12:05 PM.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    40,525
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    Let's see some pix of those relics!

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    26,944
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    What are the 'X" numbers of these machines?

    PHM
    -------


    Quote Originally Posted by Answer-Man View Post
    Just trying to get a feel for what the average age and the oldest R22 chillers that are out in service. I have two I have been babying for many years they have been in service for 43 years. I have worked on them for about 29 years. These are rotary-screws, water cooled, flooded chillers. These chillers run 24/7 and we have 2 set windows per year to take them down (out of service) if necessary. They were retubed once in about 1993 due to a tube freeze. New replacement compressors have not been available since 1991. These are Dunham Bush "Hartford" machines.

    I'm seeing signs that there could be refrigerant leakage across the tube to tube sheet joint (rolled joint with no annular grooves) into the condenser cooling water. I'm guessing I need to have a discussion with the owner about retubing (as rerolling has not worked in the past). Plugging the tube(s) does not stop the leak between the tube to tube sheet What they really need to do is consider replacing the old with new. But the owners have about 5000 pounds of R22 stockpiled. One of my selling points for the new is they can sell the R22 for a nice profit

    What is out there with respect to age for the machines you see.
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    1,641
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    Thread Starter
    X575

    I have some Pics some place I'll try to get posted

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Mixing oil and fire with a big spoon.
    Posts
    6,865
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    My oldest is pushing 25 years. Since you have a pair of them, what about changing out just 1 and saving the refrigerant for use in the other?

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    1
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    OP do repair service. If change new, someone will loose job.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    The Hot South
    Posts
    2,249
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    I just retired a 1974 Carrier 30GA045. The frame that the chiller barrel sat on rusted away from condensation and was being supported by 4X4's. We had to use chokers to lift the chiller with the crane as the lifting points rusted away.

    Also sometimes work on some 1963 Trane PCV centrifugals. The old starters are pretty cool. These machines also don't have any oil filters.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    east coast
    Posts
    78
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    I just retired two Trane's from 1984. 120 ton each and had two 60 ton recips in them. Customer painted them numerous times but they were pretty rusted through. They picked them on the original lift points but everyone was a little nervous about it that's for sure. Unfortunately I wasn't part of the new units and they went for Drakes. Cheapest damn chillers I've ever seen. Look like someone built them in a backyard shed.

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1,581
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    Quote Originally Posted by todouble View Post
    Look like someone built them in a backyard shed.
    I said the exact same thing about a couple of McQuays I saw back in the mid 80s!

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