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  1. #1
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    Sep 2015
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    Confused Gas Pressure Kit 78060

    I write because some technician state that a diaphragm device is not as accurate as a digital device.

    As a electrician I've used analog devices for measuring voltages with analog electro-voltmeters, or analog volt meters for measuring capacitances etc. which give me accurate readings; is this not the case with the 78060 Gas Pressure Kit?

    This is the first time I'll be using a Manometer for installing a gas valve at my home. I know that pressures are an important part of the Gas valve installation after Gas leaks.

    Is this devices I purchase accurate as described or is this device not as stated by other technicians as a digital device?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
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    Maple Grove, MN
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    The problem I have with analog stuff is that they don't seem to be able to stand up to rough treatment and bouncing around in the back of a service truck without going out of calibration. I still use analog refrigerant gauges and It seems like the needle never points exactly to zero if I haven't used them for a while. I'd bet that if I just left them hanging on a hook in my garage they would stay calibrated, but that's not a possibility. I'd bet if I had electronic gauges they wouldn't care so much if they got bounced around a little bit.

    You're analog yellowjacket gas gauge will get you close enough, especially if it's just for one time use. Besides, setting a gas valve to 3.5" w.c. is just a general guideline anyways to get it to work good enough under most operating conditions. A pro would use a combustion analyzer (and other digital tools) to dial that sucker in for the best efficiency and safest operation possible.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
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    The first manometer I had was a tube that you put water in. The gas pressure pushed a bubble through it. It went to 13 inches of water column. One time I was called on a started up. It was a five ton with an lp kit. It would light and flame out top to bottom in sequence. Hooked up mt manometer and it blew all the water out. I disabled the heat and called the plumber and told him ta do something. Around here there are also one or two folks that have wells. I have changed out 2 furnaces and the gas has no smell. I like a big sensitive one that is analog with a large dial. Pain to keep up with but when you suspect a restriction it ca. Also be an airflow issue and a static pressure test is about as simple as it gets.


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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by viccordero View Post
    I write because some technician state that a diaphragm device is not as accurate as a digital device.

    As a electrician I've used analog devices for measuring voltages with analog electro-voltmeters, or analog volt meters for measuring capacitances etc. which give me accurate readings; is this not the case with the 78060 Gas Pressure Kit?

    This is the first time I'll be using a Manometer for installing a gas valve at my home. I know that pressures are an important part of the Gas valve installation after Gas leaks.

    Is this devices I purchase accurate as described or is this device not as stated by other technicians as a digital device?
    Well, to actually read amps accurately you need a true rms device and most of those are digital. That or you have to plug them into the wall. I suppose they might make a battery powered analog one but that seems redundant.

  5. #5
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    Apr 2003
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    Maple Grove, MN
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ernest Crossman View Post
    Well, to actually read amps accurately you need a true rms device and most of those are digital. That or you have to plug them into the wall. I suppose they might make a battery powered analog one but that seems redundant.
    Are you just making stuff up? I've never heard of an analog ammeter that needs to be plugged into a wall, do you have a link to one?

    Also, weather or not a meter is analog or can do rms has nothing to do with how accurate it is. As long as you're using the meter on the frequency that it was designed for (60 hz in USA), rms means nothing. It only comes into play when working with frequency drives.

    Digital ammeters are more convenient and can stand up to bouncing around in a van better, but I just don't believe that what you wrote is necessarily true.

  6. #6
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    Apr 2016
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    Well most of the time it doesn't matter. But they sense current with magnets. And with three phase systems it reacts weird with some of them. I have a 4 wire delta that one leg pulls about 20% less power through. And the analog meters I am talking about I saw like 40 years ago or so in a magazine. I am not an electrician but I have wired for years in residential and light commercial. I can find a picture if it is really needed. I don't know what exactly you are refering to when you say it doesn't matter. A regular meter with two pins won't read ac amps right I ever saw. Maybe it works differently?


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  7. #7
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    Apr 2016
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    I can test 12 volts or higher DC power that way though


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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
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    Gas Pressure Kit 78060

    And some compressors are 50 hertz. Over the years I have decide electrical engineers have a really tough job. When I do change outs sometimes I have to figure power loads. And electricity is funny. Different factors change the rules. At times like in the circumstances of wires two feet or less in length and wires ability to conduct current at the service entrance is complicated because it is like night and day. A branch circuit has lengthy voltage drop heat load and even resonance to consider in some situations. When I am replacing something I am the last one with hands on. So I have to know before I start if I need a pro to come in and change the power. But in cases when you know it can carry the load and you know it but code won't allow it you have to have an engineer sign off on it. I found the math that tells why this delta system has a ground on a hot leg but I don't understand it. I marked all the three phase power panels like code calls for when there is a wild leg too. Here the grid runs at 255 most times the wild leg is 214 volts. Not good for anything supposed to run on 125


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