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Thread: Ozone Removal

  1. #1
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    Ozone Removal

    Thanks in advance to all who help me with this issue.

    I live in Western Nevada County in California, which is by virtue of being upwind of Sacramento, a high-ozone area. Given the topography, it turns out that this area has very high ozone levels throughout the day and night.

    I was wondering what products were out there to REMOVE ozone from interior air. After having searched quite a bit on the internet, the best I could come up with is a charcoal based filter, which basically provides reaction sites inside the filter.

    Charcoal based filters are fine (sold usually for odor removal), and inexpensive. The one study I found was that they weren't terribly effective. I was not able to find anything that touted its ability to remove ozone - although there are still a ton of air cleaners that rely on ozone for their air quality improvement.

    My feeling is that this issue is growing, and while Nevada County is not a high population density area, there are many parts of the country that have both high population density and high ozone levels (LA, Phoenix, Houston). It may be that this is a growth area for IAQ contractors as it appears relatively untapped at the moment.

    Thanks again for your help.

  2. #2
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    These systems may not specifically remove ozone but I suspect they would reduce it. They claim to be quite good at removing VOCs.

    http://www.naturaire.com/systems.html

  3. #3
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    Wow - pretty amazing!

    I found the filter talked about in the OSTI study - it's a 3M Filtrete filter, the same used as my cabin filter in my Toyota Sienna!

    They're 24.95 a piece, but I can't get sizes on them and I suppose they'd be too small. They have a carbon layer sandwiched between two filter media.

  4. #4
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    the HONEYCLE ZC is interesting:
    http://www.ncimfg.com/honeycle/ozone_removal.htm

    However there's no pressure drop data. I don't know how expensive it is and how to order just one.

  5. #5
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    It could be pricey as they appear to aiming it at copiers and laser printers.

  6. #6
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    Ozone Removal

    Quote Originally Posted by lumbarpuncture View Post
    Thanks in advance to all who help me with this issue.
    ...
    My feeling is that this issue is growing, and while Nevada County is not a high population density area, there are many parts of the country that have both high population density and high ozone levels (LA, Phoenix, Houston). It may be that this is a growth area for IAQ contractors as it appears relatively untapped at the moment.

    Thanks again for your help.
    It is quite easy for the normal spoor of a human habitation to consume quite a bit of ozone. If it is not the "subtle" odors, then it will be the rubbers (carpet backing) and other consumables.

    You can boost the effectiveness of a carbon element in removing ozone, by bathing it in UV-A (basically a black light).

    Carus Chemical makes "Carulite 200", that does a fine job of destroying ozone, but it takes significant depth, and a not insignificant pressure drop.

    If humidity is high, the natural decay rate of ozone is increased.

    For asthmatics, you could produce a very slight positive pressure in the home, and draw makeup air through a HEPA and a carbon filter. Beyond that, unlikely there will be much more than a "perceived" need.

  7. #7
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    I also live downwind of California and face a similar issue. Although dealing with it on a large scale is beyond what is practical to me, I believe I have good results in a small room with an IQ Air HealthPro Plus.

    I am ordering a Ozone test kit (also from IQ Air) through a reseller on Amazon (just search for Ozone test kit). I have no idea how effective these tests are, but will try it out. A google search revealed at least one other test kit option out there that didn't involve expensive instrumentation.

    The component of the Health Pro Plus that deals with ozone is the 6 pound carbon filter. To maximize the effect, consider the GC or GCX series that can provide 12 to 31 pounds of carbon and potassium permanganate media depending on the specific application.

    I don't mean to just pump IQ Air products. I am just not aware of another filter that has more than trivial amounts of gas phase control media.

    I would recommend researching EPA documents on low-level ozone pollution and see what they can recommend. Normally, ventilation is much more effective than filtration on gas phase indoor pollutants, but if the outdoor air is the source, you might need to determine if there is a specific source of clean air you can ventilate with (a particular side or elevation of your house). Ozone levels are greatly effected by weather and wind.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by BenjaminM View Post
    I also live downwind of California and face a similar issue. Although dealing with it on a large scale is beyond what is practical to me, I believe I have good results in a small room with an IQ Air HealthPro Plus.

    I am ordering a Ozone test kit (also from IQ Air) through a reseller on Amazon (just search for Ozone test kit). I have no idea how effective these tests are, but will try it out. A google search revealed at least one other test kit option out there that didn't involve expensive instrumentation.

    The component of the Health Pro Plus that deals with ozone is the 6 pound carbon filter. To maximize the effect, consider the GC or GCX series that can provide 12 to 31 pounds of carbon and potassium permanganate media depending on the specific application.

    I don't mean to just pump IQ Air products. I am just not aware of another filter that has more than trivial amounts of gas phase control media.

    I would recommend researching EPA documents on low-level ozone pollution and see what they can recommend. Normally, ventilation is much more effective than filtration on gas phase indoor pollutants, but if the outdoor air is the source, you might need to determine if there is a specific source of clean air you can ventilate with (a particular side or elevation of your house). Ozone levels are greatly effected by weather and wind.
    I have the IQ Air HealthPro Plus it's a living hell at this time. My review on Amazon like many others shows what I and many have suffered using that machine. After some time ozone like smell started coming from the unit so I stopped. Recently I left if on in my bedroom for hours and now I can't live in there. My eyes burn, have trouble breathing, and get a little dizzy. Spent two days and a lot of money shampooing the carpet with odor removing products but the odor in the carpet cannot be removed. I washed the walls, furniture, all blankets, pillows, and everything basically. I've spent a lot of money on charcoal products, vinegar, humidity removers, and today came a new air cleaner but from what I've read it will do little if anything. Several reviews state they will have to paint the place and get new carpet and furniture and it looks like the same story for me. I'm going on 70 so obviously concerned about my lung health. I purchased strong fans to blow air in the room and at night put the fans outside to blow in the fresh air. This is a serious problem and IQ air has replaced many filters but users state they caused the same problem. My warranty has expired and being on a limited income I scared. This will require a major re-do for the room. Check out the review and you will see many like mine so buyer beware. IF ANYBODY has any ideas or products that will help, I will be extremely grateful. I've spent days searching the internet and can only find articles selling ozone machines when I search for Ozone removal. HELP!

  9. #9
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    Way to bring a thread back from the dead. Ozone is a short life-cycle gas. If you're having issues after 24 hours (less with good ventilation) you need to look into what else it could be. All the ozone is gone (other than the trace that is found naturally in your air).

  10. #10
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    I can smell it on the carpet. Another complained, in IQ review, that particles were emitted from his IQ Air unit all over including the carpet, walls and everywhere. Shampooing and spays on the carpet worked until dry. How he knows exactly that point regarding "Particles" wasn't stated. The exact same smell came from my unit when I put my face up to it and after I removed all 3 filters the same odor is in the filters. I had this problem months or a year ago when last used but stopped the unit immediately and the smell dissipated. Since the unit, this time was left on in a closed room for hours the smell is serious and remains. I also had the same problem with a Honeywell unit but not as serious because after changing filters and still experiencing the smell I stopped using it. If you do a search online you will see this is not rare especially with the IQ Air. I know for sure due to exactly when the problem started, from the smell coming from the unit, and all the stories exactly like mine, that the order is from the unit but let's say you are correct that I should look into what else it could be. Then where or how do I start? Who do I call? I've been working day and night on this and as previously stated purchased many tools to help with no luck. I will say with fans blowing outside air in at night and the temp goes down it lessens the problem First thing in the morning it's weak. As the day gets hotter ( I use the air conditioner with a Merv 13 filter) it's very strong and stings the eyes. I'm trying various products to remove humidity to see if it passes in days or weeks. I'm in California so the humidity is not like other States but I do know it increases the problem. Thank you for taking the time to reply. I wasn't expecting any since I just joined this group yesterday and after reading the posting date of this topic figured nobody would see it

  11. #11
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    The issue with the some carbon based filters is not the carbon but the additives that are sometimes added, usually Potassium permanganate.

    Carbon can trap some VOCs (not all) in the caverns between the carbon molecules. But carbon is picky - it's not effective at trapping all VOCs, especially aldehydes like formaldehyde.
    Potassium permanganate is added to chemically react with the VOCs that are poorly trapped by carbon. Folks often report residual effects of this process. Typically this is caused by partially oxidizes components.

    One disadvantage of carbon is that it can release previously trapped VOCs. This usually happens when the filter is saturated or humidity is high. Also carbon is picky. It can displace a previously trapped VOC when a more attractive one comes through. Potassium permanganate doesn't have this problem but does suffer the issue mentioned above.

    Ozone smell can linger for months - especially after intense long term shock treatments. Ozone, like potassium permanganate, is an oxidizer. It breaks carbon/hydrogen bonds of VOCs -But often times leaves partially oxidizes intermediates. Often time these intermediates are more toxic than the original VOCs (primarily formaldehyde). Also ozone can produce a ultra fine particulate residue that should be avoided. A good quality HEPA should probably be used during and after ozone treatments. Lots of folks use ozone and claim effectiveness but beware!

    HYdrogen Peroxide is rumored to not only help eliminate residual ozone smell but might convert the remaining ozone to Hydroxyl Ions. Hydroxyl Ions are the most powerful tool for VOC destruction. Much cleaner and more powerful than ozone by itself. I'm investigating this process currently.

    Lots of companies sell fancy solutions. Maybe some work but they all lack hard provable data taken in real living/work spaces. There is a big hole in the VOC remediation industry that's filled with marketing hype.

    I learned all this the hard way.

    Vortex, a Canadian company, produces by far the best carbon filters/blowers combos I've seen. Not only is performance untouched but price is less than half of the competition.
    These units are pure carbon, no additives. Their smallest filter has 30 lbs of carbon + 440 cfm blower for about $350.00. Half the price of the Austin Air devices and twice as much carbon
    https://www.hvacquick.com/products/r...Carbon-Filters

  12. #12
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    Thanks so much and you are one of the few to get it. All I hear is Ozone or the smell should dissipate in a few hours and for me it's been days and a lot of money. In fact minutes ago I placed another of many orders with Amazon to help with the problem, Coconut Charcoal. I received another air cleaner today that I also bought after reviewing many top ten lists but now know I've wasted my money. Today, I also put Extra Strong smelling carpet baking soda on the carpet and now I have to contend with another very strong odor. I had to use the shampooer with just water to remove what I could. I've aired out, in the hot California sun, all 3 filters from the IQ Air for a couple of days and they seem slightly cleaner except the charcoal filter still has some of that Ozone odor. The air purifier I set up today (Coway) has lights to detect air quality and the good quality color was on since I started the system So even if there was Ozone present it's not detected and that probably would be due to no actual ozone just the smell.
    I would guess a big concern is possible health damage and the time you've stated for it to dissipate is a little scary. Do you believe Hydrogen Peroxide is safe on carpet? I will immediately start a Google search to see if I can find something on that. Again, thank you so much for a great detailed explanation of the situation. I did not get this problem from an ozone unit but did from the IQ Air purifier which is highly rated

  13. #13
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    I had assumed you applied an ozone shock treatment. I see now that's not the case.
    There is no way the IQ Air could generate the ozone to explain what you are experiencing. Impossible.

    I suspect the carbon in the IQ Air is off gassing due to saturation, temperature or humidity. I also assumed your unit was new, but that appears not to be the case. There are issues with potassium permanganate but I'm not convinced that's your issue. I would contact IQ Air directly, not a reseller, and describe your issue..

    If you do want a very good carbon filter I'd check out my earlier recommendation:
    https://www.hvacquick.com/products/r...Carbon-Filters

    Please keep me informed as this is a mystery to me.

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