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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Iowa
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    1,696
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    I don't want to sound like a dad, but: It depends on how big you wish to grow the company. If you wish to get large contracts, state & federal contracts, large municipal contracts, get a BSME then get the PE, go to work. Get a Project Management certificate (CPM or CPPM) from PMI institute. Then work on the master stuff for financing & marketing to go with it. Because to get these jobs you need to have a BSME (PE) to review all drawing, specs, etc.. for most larger commercial job bids. Financing & marketing will help you understand how to swing the cash needed for these large jobs. May as well keep it in house. Having been down this road a masters in Engineering is not needed unless you wish to get into some pretty complicated design and evaluation type work. If you get this and still working as a tech you are not bringing your full potential to the family business. I don't see the BS in HVAC will get you where I think you want to be.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    3
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    I graduated from Ferris State University. It was a great HVAC engineering school. Many students from Ferris went to building control field, for example Honeywell, or Johnson Control. The 2 years at Ferris would promote you from technician mindset to engineering world. Good luck at Big Rapids.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Posts
    268
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    With an engineering degree you would probably be able to do all the things you were talking about doing, except you would have an engineering degree. In this world its worth $$. Keep the same game plan... But go engineering.

    Remember, those student loans don't pay off themselves.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Posts
    2
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    B.S.E.T HVAC/R Degree Ferris

    Quote Originally Posted by mv-hvac View Post
    I graduated from Ferris State University. It was a great HVAC engineering school. Many students from Ferris went to building control field, for example Honeywell, or Johnson Control. The 2 years at Ferris would promote you from technician mindset to engineering world. Good luck at Big Rapids.
    Hi, As a Ferris HVAC/R graduated can you tall me if you every apply for any designee position or If you had a problem that you do not have a PE licence? Or did you get it some how? Some people say that is depend on the state but Wi is not one of them. In most cases when I take a look and do some research for some opening position for HVAC/R Engineer or Designer and similar position every one asking for the PE licence and BSME Degree. In this moment I am finishing my A.A.S Degree and looking to get in to the field as a technician and hopefully after few years to the designer position. The issue get a BSME is like almost get 40 credit hours just finish only the requirement to enroll for BSME program, which will be big disappointment and long commitment. The Ferris degree will take approximately 3.5 years already as they will accept my A.A.S degree, but go for the BSME will minimum take double the time as I will be full time worker. I try to do some research on program but do not come up with really lot of information. Also lately I have find out that the program do not have any academic accreditation at all, so little worried to spend the money and time on something that will not benefit my. SO if you can give me any inside on the situation what to expect will be great.

    Thanks L.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    1,696
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    LD91

    First, Welcome to the site. There's nothing wrong with reading old threads. I don't know if you noticed this is a 4 year old thread. It is generally recommended if a thread is more than 4 -5 months old start a new thread. What I see as the reason, as I skimmed the responses many have not been active so the chances of them responding is low. Secondly I had to skim back because I did not remember what the thread was about or what I said 4 years ago

    Just so you are aware, virtually all degrees will allow you to proficiency up to 50% of your degree. Meaning you get credit for life and previous experience. Typically the schools have proficiency (KLEP) tests you can take. Based on how well you do or do not do will determine what can be bypassed.

    If you want to be a super-tech and have a high earning potential you do not need a 4 year BS degree to accomplish this. I can't think of a time I needed to prove I had a 4 year degree to get the job done.

    Look into On-line degrees if you want a BS. All training and education is worth while but some is more cost effective and convenient. College education today is much different than it was 5 years ago and there is a night and day difference when compared to 10 or 15 years ago. On-line allows a much greater flexibility and does not cost as much as being on campus.

    There are number here on this site that actually have HVAC degrees and they say it was 100% worthwhile. But it is just my opinion you do not need to major in HVAC/R. You learn the same principles in a typical mechanical program. I started out with a medical learning background. What I learned in math, physics, chemistry, biology, thermodynamics, materials science … were all the same principles and allowed me to move to HVAC very easy.

    So good luck in your endeavors with higher education and the HVAC world

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