Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 14 to 26 of 36
  1. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    edmonds wa
    Posts
    4,424
    Post Likes
    After you give them, what might be the worst case of trying the repair and they agree, go for it. Pull out the fin area with needle nose pliers, imp cutter will usually get in there to cut out, then repair couplings and a light flame with the torch. At least its worth a shot, the charge is already gone so within a hour you should know the results. If the unit has service valves put in a flare drier and a extra shut off valve so you can get all the moisture out. Hopefully it had a low pressure switch to keep the comp off,if not may want to check before repairs.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    north suburbs of Chicago
    Posts
    1,686
    Post Likes
    Last time I repaired a condenser coil I think I was able to braze fill the hole just using Mapp gas. It was years ago though and that copper was probably much thicker. Totally dumb move on my part. The owners is out there talking with me and next door the landscapers got like three leaf blowers going. I'm putting the screws back in with a nut driver and somehow mixed them up. I ended up screwing one right into the darn copper tube! Course I couldn't hear the freon peeing out cause of the leaf blower racket.......

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    673
    Post Likes
    Fixed many condensers. Like others have said Silphosing over the leak is first choice. I have spliced in a piece by sliding a piece of 1/2" over the tube sliding it back and pinching the ends down. The coil is already leaking, what do have to loose?

  4. #17
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Bay Area California
    Posts
    25,334
    Post Likes
    Can you get an old condenser with that thinner tubing to practice on? If you can see the leak, it's not really that big of a deal. Just heat the copper slowly while continually testing the temp with the silphos.


    Quote Originally Posted by Old Sparky View Post
    If there is a significant hole in an outdoor coil, can you replace a small section of tubing, maybe one to two inches long, within the coil itself. I know that the tubing in the coil is thinner than standard ACR tubing. I was thinking of using 3/8" tubing and slipping 1/2" tubing over is as a coupling. The customer is not willing to spend the money, any ideas? Any comments appreciated. Thank you!

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Dover, DE
    Posts
    11,664
    Post Likes
    Is it possible? Depending on the location of said leak, yes it is.
    The customer needs to be made aware that fixing one coil leak DOES NOT warranty the coil against any future leak(s).
    And when you try and fix it, you'd better be as skillful with a torch as Jessie James was with a gun. Not enough heat, and the braze will glob and not seal. Too much, and you'll blow a hole in the tube. A slow eye will cause you to blow a hole in the tube nearest to the leak from holding the torch in the same spot for too long.
    I havent failed. Ive just found 10,000 ways that wont work. - Thomas Edison

    Its not whether you get knocked down, its whether you get up. - Vince Lombardi

    "In this house we obey the laws of thermodynamics" - Homer Simpson

    Local 486 Instructor & Service Technician

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Wi
    Posts
    648
    Post Likes
    I have repaired many over the years if you cant find a repair coupling get one that has the dimples instead of the ring all the way around it then take something hard and rounded on the end and work that dimple out allowing you to slip it on further. You have to discuss it with the customer on what you feel the odds are on success. If you have a 2000 dollar condenser it should be worth a try. You can tell when you have a rotten one.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    41
    Post Likes
    I have done it a few times over the years, no real issue with it.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, United States
    Posts
    17,110
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by rider77 View Post
    Is it possible? Depending on the location of said leak, yes it is.
    The customer needs to be made aware that fixing one coil leak DOES NOT warranty the coil against any future leak(s).
    And when you try and fix it, you'd better be as skillful with a torch as Jessie James was with a gun. Not enough heat, and the braze will glob and not seal. Too much, and you'll blow a hole in the tube. A slow eye will cause you to blow a hole in the tube nearest to the leak from holding the torch in the same spot for too long.
    It's really not that dramatic, now of it was aluminum then yeah you better be careful because that stuff will melt by just looking at it wrong but rifled copper really isn't that difficult. You gotta know how to wield a torch but i'd call it one of the easier things to do just don't go in there with a rosebud on the highest regulator setting you can get and it'll be fine.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Chicagoland Area
    Posts
    8,132
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by Galt View Post
    I have repaired many over the years if you cant find a repair coupling get one that has the dimples instead of the ring all the way around it then take something hard and rounded on the end and work that dimple out allowing you to slip it on further. You have to discuss it with the customer on what you feel the odds are on success. If you have a 2000 dollar condenser it should be worth a try. You can tell when you have a rotten one.
    Easier to swage a piece of copper
    Officially, Down for the count

    YOU HAVE TO GET OFF YOUR ASS TO GET ON YOUR FEET

    I know enough to know, I don't know enough
    Liberalism-Ideas so good they mandate them

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    hampton roads va
    Posts
    104
    Post Likes
    I have even cut a pass out before on larger tonnage machines. Now on small stuff apposed to torching the coil up I would still almost always cut that pass out and let her eat. Saves the head ache of fighting a torch in there. Find the U bend cut it out and attach to next in sequence.

  11. #24
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    California
    Posts
    793
    Post Likes
    Trane/AS makes a part to fix these. I did one last summer.

    KIT01146

    I can post some pics if it helps.

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    5
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Thank you all for the great feedback. I am going to make an attempt to repair the coil. It seems very doable.

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    6,648
    Post Likes
    Keep your flame on the thicker copper piece you inserted

    If the tube is on bottom row , you need to tilt coil up , that bottom is full of oil ....

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •