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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
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    Outdoor Coil Repair

    If there is a significant hole in an outdoor coil, can you replace a small section of tubing, maybe one to two inches long, within the coil itself. I know that the tubing in the coil is thinner than standard ACR tubing. I was thinking of using 3/8" tubing and slipping 1/2" tubing over is as a coupling. The customer is not willing to spend the money, any ideas? Any comments appreciated. Thank you!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold, NY
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    By the time you remove the fins enough to cut the tubing then melt more by brazing, the coil is shot.
    New coil

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    West Haven, CT
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    106
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    I've seen people do it with solder but brazing it the pipe can't handle the heat necessary to get the brazen to flow. It just melts away. And I'm not saying to solder it. I'm just saying that's the only time I've seen it done without the pipe melted away

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, United States
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    17,110
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    Just clean off the fins, fill the hole with silphos then stick some steel wool or Brillo to fill the space where the fins are gone.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Bay Area California
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    I've repaired several copper condensers through the years. The trick is just getting the access. If the leak is on an inner row, then it becomes much more difficult. I passed on one a couple of weeks ago, the only thing I know for sure is that it was not on the outer row of a four row condenser.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    New England
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    227
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    done this several times. clear fins out of the way. and braze a new piece in. would not use solder. if you know how to braze its easy. cant imagine clearing a small amount of fins out of the way destroying the rest of the coil. sometimes people cant afford a new coil and repairing the one they have is better than doing nothing at all. just be straight forward with customer

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    8,146
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    If you try to fix it you will have to live with it forever.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Chicagoland Area
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    8,479
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    Done it plenty on the commercial side. You need to be skillful with the torch or you're going to burn thru it
    Officially, Down for the count

    YOU HAVE TO GET OFF YOUR ASS TO GET ON YOUR FEET

    I know enough to know, I don't know enough
    Liberalism-Ideas so good they mandate them

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Richmond, VA
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    4,694
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    Quote Originally Posted by lytning View Post
    If you try to fix it you will have to live with it forever.
    This.

    If your patchwork doesn't hold or you wind up damaging the coil in the process, it'll be your fault. Is that aggravation worth dealing with because the customer is too cheap to afford air conditioning? Quote him a new coil.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, United States
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    Quote Originally Posted by CircusEnvy View Post
    This.

    If your patchwork doesn't hold or you wind up damaging the coil in the process, it'll be your fault. Is that aggravation worth dealing with because the customer is too cheap to afford air conditioning? Quote him a new coil.
    We are technicians brought in to fix broken stuff. I've fixed plenty of leaks and haven't had a problem. If there was a leak on the line set would you say they need a new line-set?

    I would give the customer the option to repair vs. Replace coil vs. Replace system but ultimately it's their choice and I'll do whatever they want. Depending a lot of things Id give them my recommendation of which I would choose if I were in their shoes.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Richmond, VA
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    Quote Originally Posted by jtrammel View Post
    We are technicians brought in to fix broken stuff. I've fixed plenty of leaks and haven't had a problem. If there was a leak on the line set would you say they need a new line-set?
    Well, a lineset is different. You can easily fill in a hole on that, slide a coupling over it, or swage it. But I find coils to be too delicate to attempt repairing, unless a U-bend needs to be replaced. And usually if the coil has sprung a leak somewhere, it's a sign that the coil's overall integrity is being compromised and there's a good chance another leak will present itself somewhere else. How much money does the customer spend on multiple pump downs/recoveries and vacuums to keep patching a corroding coil?

    At the very least, I would get in writing that there is absolutely no guarantee in repairing the leak.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, United States
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    Outdoor Coil Repair

    Quote Originally Posted by CircusEnvy View Post
    Well, a lineset is different. You can easily fill in a hole on that, slide a coupling over it, or swage it. But I find coils to be too delicate to attempt repairing, unless a U-bend needs to be replaced. And usually if the coil has sprung a leak somewhere, it's a sign that the coil's overall integrity is being compromised and there's a good chance another leak will present itself somewhere.

    At the very least, I would get in writing that there is absolutely no guarantee in repairing the leak.
    That's true with evaporator coils but condenser coil leaks 95% of the time the cause can be found and corrected and are easily repairable.
    Heating/Cooling Services Inc.
    www.heatingandcoolingservicesinc.com

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    St Paul, minnesota
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    beware the copper inside the coil the copper is a lot thinner not schedule L or M more like schedule Z if that even existed, it's literally wafer thin. It's made that way and rifled on the inside for efficiency. It's very easy to blow a larger hole through it while heating up the patch coupling. I've repaired them numerous times with oxy/acet torch with a low fan flame. Haven't had much with air acetylene because you can't really turn the flame down much and holding it farther away doesn't help much.

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