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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    In a kitchen with my head stuck in an oven
    Posts
    1,540
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    A repair I really enjoyed doing...



    UH! No, NOT the smoker. Sorry about that…



    I’m talking about THIS:



    Being in-house for three years now, I enjoy having the luxury of a well-outfitted workshop, a group of seven of us to span three shifts (I’m on 1st now) and…the extra time to take on equipment needing more than just an emergency repair. We really do have some unique stuff here that you won't find in typical restaurants. Plenty to do too. At last count, we have twenty-five combi-ovens and forty-three fryer vats scattered throughout our kitchens.

    Ailing combi-ovens, fryers, steam kettles, floor and spiral mixers, banquet carts, vacuum sealers, dough sheeters and MUCH more…have frequented our shop floorspace when they were deserving of some extra special attention. Of course, the hand-held and counter-top stuff makes it to our shop by default.

    Of them all, my favorite unit to work on was this manual flywheel slicer. With all the complexities coursing through our MANY types of commercial appliances needing fixing, the simplicity of this jewel was a welcomed sight.

    Manufactured in Italy by “NOAW” as model M330, Berkel rebadges them as their model 330M. We have two of these slicers. This one’s for the antipasto service counter at our Italian restaurant and is a featured item along with their brick oven – always in full view of the guests.

    The original maroon paint on the slicer's aluminum frame was unsightly. Blistering in spots and severely scratched up, so we were asked to have it repaint. I took on the project by doing the dis-assembly/prep/reassembly - which entailed nearly a month of sporadic efforts towards it to finally get it done.

    Our paint shop worked their magic while I meticulously cleaned up all of the machine works and order parts. The paint had ample time to set while we awaited receipt of parts like bearings, the chain, the feet and a few knobs.

    Once the parts arrived, I s-l-o-w-l-y pieced everything back together. I’d taken many pictures while tearing it down, which I definitely needed in order to get it back together correctly. The only minor aggravation was the paint shop didn’t exactly mask off some of the critical areas (such as where the numerous bearings press into), so there were many unanticipated hours needed for the reassembly.

    Since I made a video of its inner-workings, I finally figured out how to share it:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0WspXXeerlo


    Here are a few other videos I found that demonstrate how it's used:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-b9IHDqcK5k

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJS8uqPfhM0


    "You never know what others don't know." -

    If I can't laugh at myself...then I'll laugh at YOU! -

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    87
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    Impressive! Kind of like restoring an old tractor or car! And it gets displayed AND used!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Chicagoland Area
    Posts
    8,450
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    Looks too pretty to use. Nice job
    Officially, Down for the count

    YOU HAVE TO GET OFF YOUR ASS TO GET ON YOUR FEET

    I know enough to know, I don't know enough
    Liberalism-Ideas so good they mandate them

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Midwest Iowa
    Posts
    32
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    Hey that is really nice looking and inspiring. I wonder if I can do something like that with some of the dead units in our bone yard. Does a Hobart slicer HAVE to be just dull aluminum?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    18,681
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    Very nice, and very well presented. The video was as nice as the machine. Acrylic polyurethane finish ?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    In a kitchen with my head stuck in an oven
    Posts
    1,540
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Thanks. First attempt on YouTube. Used their video editor solely for stabilizing my shaky video. Cumbersome to use compared to WLMM.

    I can't take credit for the paint - other than polishing of my smudges out. I'm not very knowledgeable in that area.

    I did the disassembly and the many hours spent cleaning & rebuilding...and the gloating and signing of autographs for the entourage of kitchen staff that tagged along as I carted it through the kitchens back its appointed place.

    As simple as that slicer is, it was finicky about how it needed put back together.

    Mrbluebottle, you'd have to research aluminium finishes to find your answer. I figure an anodized surface may need some redoing before it'd take a coating of paint.

    That's an awesome idea though. Never thought about how such a paint job would look on a standard electric slicer. You might have something there.


    "You never know what others don't know." -

    If I can't laugh at myself...then I'll laugh at YOU! -

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