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  1. #14
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Cumming, GA
    Posts
    1,903
    Post Likes
    We use a propress daily. It is a fantastic tool. We only had a couple fittings leak in probably 10,000 or more!

    The fittings are little more expensive but the time and reliability makes up for it.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    20
    Post Likes
    We have used propess a ton when plumbing dairys. Also some at car washes. I don't recall ever having more than 2 leaks.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    938
    Post Likes
    it used propress since it came out at least 20 years, on chilled,condenser,closed loop heat pump systems and now refrigeration and black pipe. haven't had any problems to speak of. the only downside is cost of the different tools and fittings. very costly for a small contractor

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Etters PA.
    Posts
    775
    Post Likes
    😝😝😝 looks like crap. Used it once on a 2 inch main and loved it. I'd rather solder.

    Sent from my SM-N920P using Tapatalk

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    30
    Post Likes
    We got into pressing because a few of our school district accounts required it. We're a 2 man company and cautiously made the investment in the tooling, and it paid for itself a lot sooner than we expected. Our service work is T&M, but I imagine a flat rate shop would see an extremely fast ROI. It's not my go-to 100% of the time residentially, because of the fitting costs. But then there are times when it's the only thing I'll use. It's worth the investment. And we will not use sharkbites as a permanent fix in any customers home.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    North Plainfield ,NJ
    Posts
    132
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by ndk1911 View Post
    We got into pressing because a few of our school district accounts required it. We're a 2 man company and cautiously made the investment in the tooling, and it paid for itself a lot sooner than we expected. Our service work is T&M, but I imagine a flat rate shop would see an extremely fast ROI. It's not my go-to 100% of the time residentially, because of the fitting costs. But then there are times when it's the only thing I'll use. It's worth the investment. And we will not use sharkbites as a permanent fix in any customers home.
    Shark bite fittings are garbage especially in the north. It is a busting point in frozen pipes and in high water pressure townships.

    Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Posts
    12
    Post Likes
    It's a damn shame. I think propress has a place in repair for areas where you can't use a torch. My son is a first year apprentice fitter in Local 120. Even in new construction they use propress every chance they get. He said the jobs come specced like that to save man hours. But damn the man hours you save pale in comparison to the cost of the fittings plus these young guys don't learn to master sweating pipe.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    1,216
    Post Likes
    Just my experience, I've seen it time and time again the cost of propress fitting is less than the additional man hour cost over soldering. As stated Propress has a place and so does soldering and Pex. When you bid hard money jobs Pex is the cheapest, then propress and both are usually less expensive than sweat copper if ypu track both time and material

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Saavannah GA
    Posts
    8
    Post Likes
    I worked at a hospital for 13 years. Propress can be great, but it really does require a skilled installer. Itís not forgiving like a sweat or braze joint. Iíve done propress up to 3 inches. If you donít properly deburr piping, you will cut the O-ring. Price a 3 inch propress valve just for fun.$$$$$. The other issue Iíve seen is on more complicated assemblies like water fill where there is a regulator, relief valve, isolation and bypass valves. If you screw up, and youíve put a bunch of fitting together without much pipe length between them, you would have to toss the whole thing. Iíve seen hundreds of bucks worth of fittings tossed in the bin because of this. Space things out when you can in case it needs repair.
    What it is stellar at is when you need to do a repair, but canít get the water shut off entirely. Cut pipe, ream it, slip on an open propress ball valve, press it in place, close the valve. Iíve also seen several jobs where installers forgot to press a fitting. Sometimes the piping will hold it in place indefinitely, and the o-ring will seal without being pressed, sometimes it doesnít. From a facilities side itís very expensive to stock, vs sweat fittings, but often worthwhile on planned repairs and installs, especially where itís difficult to do hot work.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    605
    Post Likes
    Here is a 3inch water line that froze and popped last week. My only complaint with PP is you can get everything plumb and level hit the button and it may kick a little. The 3 inch couple did that in this picture.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

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