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  1. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    276
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    If you invent a tool, and you don't get a patent or provisional right away, and you use it at work, and someone sees it, it is considered as disclosed publicly, especially if you have waited a year before getting around to doing anything.
    I use several tools at work that I invented that I can never patent. It's ok because they make life easier and I share them with my fellow workers.

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Iowa City, IA
    Posts
    5
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    An issue that small guys have with the patent process is not only getting the patent but trying to defend it. A big company or Chinese firm can make knockoffs and sell you out of the market before you even get a chance to recognize the infringement. Paying to defend your patent in court is also prohibitive to many people making the patent useless.

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Posts
    10
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    Quote Originally Posted by mccann View Post
    If you invent a tool, and you don't get a patent or provisional right away, and you use it at work, and someone sees it, it is considered as disclosed publicly, especially if you have waited a year before getting around to doing anything.
    I use several tools at work that I invented that I can never patent. It's ok because they make life easier and I share them with my fellow workers.
    This. Make sense.

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Northern NV
    Posts
    1,404
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    Diesel V-8? Why reinvent the "wheel?"

    http://www.yanmar-es.com/products/mchp/

  5. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Northern NV
    Posts
    1,404
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  6. #32
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Whewell View Post
    I like thinking of things like this. Figure also, the pool itself can be a heat reservoir from which to heat the home, within a limited temperature range. I think you get more eficient mass transfer of heat btw liquid (water) at the heat exchanger, versus gas (air). eliminate the need for the condensor fan, instead use convection and maybe a small circulating pump.
    Using waste heat from a building to supplement pool heating has been done for a long time. It is very common in schools and gyms. I've not heard of it being done on a house, but I suspect that is because most homes don't generally throw off enough heat to make a significant difference to a pool. My hot tub heater, which, according to the manual, can handle a swimming pool up to 15,000 gallons has an input of 125K btu/h, so puts out about 8 tons. Even if your house had a 5-ton system, it's only putting that out during peak cooling, the time you least need pool heating.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Whewell View Post
    We had an oil-fired boiler in the basement of our first house, it used circulating baseboard water heat method. I always wanted to throw the furnace away, and in its place put an Oldsmobile 350 V8 diesel, and automated controls. Basically, the circulating baseboard heat would be powered by the water pump on the engine, and a diesel can run on home heating oil. Also, wanted to hook up a transmission to it, having a generator at the output shaft. So basically, heat your house using diesel, and have an emergency generator as a bonus always on standby. The teachers all told me that most of the energy of burning a fuel in a car goes to "waste heat". So, why waste it ? Instead, use it. Plus in addition to the circulating engine coolant in the baseboard radiators, the whole basement would heat up anyway just because theres a motor present. Could also use the electricity from the generator to power some electric heaters too. When the system breaks down, just go to the auto parts store......
    I don't know if I'd want to have to change the oil on my furnace. I'm also not sure how I would handle the sound of a diesel engine idling in my basement 24 hours a day.

    Seriously, it would be much less efficient than a regular oil furnace. Some of the fuel's energy would have to go to overcoming the friction of the moving engine parts.

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