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Thread: Inventors beware

  1. #21
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    Somebody's got to be doing the pool thing, probably corrosion becomes an issue with submerged coils but still, if one can precisely control the temp of the liquid refrigerant prior to delivery to the evaporator, what more can one ask for ?

  2. #22
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    Now I'm studying how to make proper drawings and use the correct words. I intend to get a provisional patent, which will last 1 year. Then I will offer the idea to a few companies. If they don't buy it, say it's already invented or say it is stupid , I'll just make the thing for friends. I won't sell it myself because of liability and taxes. I have already given a few out at work for guys to test; which I know is a foolish risk because someone may steal the idea. Such is life. China would steal it anyway if its' good. So, I'll risk a $1000 for a, so-so, provisional patent and learn a lot. I have learned about polymers and steel, wires and molds, all kinds of stuff, bought tools and tried crazy configurations. I have already profited.

  3. #23
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    I've seen this many many times. Its not just the "correct words", but rather, how they're used and arranged. One can choose the right notes for a song, but their effectiveness as music depends on their proper arrangement and timing. I think what you're up against mostly are 35 USC 112 requirements for enablement, sufficiency of disclosure, and the "written description requirement". Searching for articles or case law on those topics will give you more reading material, if your intent is to learn. The drawings requirements for a provisional application are relaxed, and there is no such thing as a "provisional patent". One problem which is easy to have, is to make an incomplete disclosure, and rely on your filing date as "covering" what you later reveal to others. If the disclosure is insufficient, the provisional application can be literally, worthless. Provisional applications have fewer requirements, but they're held to the same strict standards as a non-provisional, or regular application. They are definitely not a substitute in law, that enables scant disclosures to become sufficient ones. My opinion, the right way to do it is to have spent a little more to truly secure any valuable IP you may have generated, and the laws are so complex its literally impossible for an inventor to write an adequate disclosure. You might want to also check your disclosure to others to see if you've statutorily barred any rights, and also what might be considered as a public use, the pertinent statute is 35 USC 102, definitely worth a read. I leave you with this quote from John Ruskin:


    "It's unwise to pay too much, but it's worse to pay too little. When
    you pay too much, you lose a little money - that's all. When you pay
    too little, you sometimes lose everything, because the thing you
    bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do. The
    common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a
    lot - it can't be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well
    to add something for the risk you run, and if you do that you will
    have enough to pay for something better.”

    Good luck 1

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Whewell View Post
    Somebody's got to be doing the pool thing, probably corrosion becomes an issue with submerged coils but still, if one can precisely control the temp of the liquid refrigerant prior to delivery to the evaporator, what more can one ask for ?
    Years ago... I remember someone at this forum... (in the PRO section)
    Cobbled together an arrangement to exhaust the heat from his house into his backyard pool...
    If I remember, he used the HXE (heat exchanger) from a geo-thermal unit.
    I think he had to fiddle with it for a bit... but it DID work.

    I do know there are conventional air to water HP's that are designed to heat pools... they are cheaper to run than gas pool heaters... when the outdoor temps are moderate (Springtime... during the heat of the day... to get the pool up to temp sooner).
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    GA's basic rules of home heating and AC upgrades:
    *Installation is more important than the brand of equipment
    *The duct system keeps the house comfortable; the equipment only heats and cools (and dehumidifies)
    *The value of comfort, over the long term; leave economic choices behind!
    Choose your contractor wisely!

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  6. #25
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    I like thinking of things like this. Figure also, the pool itself can be a heat reservoir from which to heat the home, within a limited temperature range. I think you get more eficient mass transfer of heat btw liquid (water) at the heat exchanger, versus gas (air). eliminate the need for the condensor fan, instead use convection and maybe a small circulating pump.

    We had an oil-fired boiler in the basement of our first house, it used circulating baseboard water heat method. I always wanted to throw the furnace away, and in its place put an Oldsmobile 350 V8 diesel, and automated controls. Basically, the circulating baseboard heat would be powered by the water pump on the engine, and a diesel can run on home heating oil. Also, wanted to hook up a transmission to it, having a generator at the output shaft. So basically, heat your house using diesel, and have an emergency generator as a bonus always on standby. The teachers all told me that most of the energy of burning a fuel in a car goes to "waste heat". So, why waste it ? Instead, use it. Plus in addition to the circulating engine coolant in the baseboard radiators, the whole basement would heat up anyway just because theres a motor present. Could also use the electricity from the generator to power some electric heaters too. When the system breaks down, just go to the auto parts store......

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  8. #26
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    Heard a talk show on subject years back. They said"ask your patent company rep,for references". The End

  9. #27
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    If you invent a tool, and you don't get a patent or provisional right away, and you use it at work, and someone sees it, it is considered as disclosed publicly, especially if you have waited a year before getting around to doing anything.
    I use several tools at work that I invented that I can never patent. It's ok because they make life easier and I share them with my fellow workers.

  10. #28
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    An issue that small guys have with the patent process is not only getting the patent but trying to defend it. A big company or Chinese firm can make knockoffs and sell you out of the market before you even get a chance to recognize the infringement. Paying to defend your patent in court is also prohibitive to many people making the patent useless.

  11. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by mccann View Post
    If you invent a tool, and you don't get a patent or provisional right away, and you use it at work, and someone sees it, it is considered as disclosed publicly, especially if you have waited a year before getting around to doing anything.
    I use several tools at work that I invented that I can never patent. It's ok because they make life easier and I share them with my fellow workers.
    This. Make sense.

  12. #30
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    Diesel V-8? Why reinvent the "wheel?"

    http://www.yanmar-es.com/products/mchp/

  13. #31
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  14. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Whewell View Post
    I like thinking of things like this. Figure also, the pool itself can be a heat reservoir from which to heat the home, within a limited temperature range. I think you get more eficient mass transfer of heat btw liquid (water) at the heat exchanger, versus gas (air). eliminate the need for the condensor fan, instead use convection and maybe a small circulating pump.
    Using waste heat from a building to supplement pool heating has been done for a long time. It is very common in schools and gyms. I've not heard of it being done on a house, but I suspect that is because most homes don't generally throw off enough heat to make a significant difference to a pool. My hot tub heater, which, according to the manual, can handle a swimming pool up to 15,000 gallons has an input of 125K btu/h, so puts out about 8 tons. Even if your house had a 5-ton system, it's only putting that out during peak cooling, the time you least need pool heating.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Whewell View Post
    We had an oil-fired boiler in the basement of our first house, it used circulating baseboard water heat method. I always wanted to throw the furnace away, and in its place put an Oldsmobile 350 V8 diesel, and automated controls. Basically, the circulating baseboard heat would be powered by the water pump on the engine, and a diesel can run on home heating oil. Also, wanted to hook up a transmission to it, having a generator at the output shaft. So basically, heat your house using diesel, and have an emergency generator as a bonus always on standby. The teachers all told me that most of the energy of burning a fuel in a car goes to "waste heat". So, why waste it ? Instead, use it. Plus in addition to the circulating engine coolant in the baseboard radiators, the whole basement would heat up anyway just because theres a motor present. Could also use the electricity from the generator to power some electric heaters too. When the system breaks down, just go to the auto parts store......
    I don't know if I'd want to have to change the oil on my furnace. I'm also not sure how I would handle the sound of a diesel engine idling in my basement 24 hours a day.

    Seriously, it would be much less efficient than a regular oil furnace. Some of the fuel's energy would have to go to overcoming the friction of the moving engine parts.

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