Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 52

Thread: Pesto

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    9,775
    Post Likes
    To add a bit to the slut oil from Italy. Years ago there was an Italian cartel that was arrested for selling red wine that had been diluted with ox blood. Don't know how it rated on the wine scale. Where would one acquire ox blood?
    That same group was also convicted of grinding up some white umbrella handles they acquired. Seems they thought they could add the ground up plastic to grated cheese and no one would know. My thinking is anyone that buys grated cheese gets the cheese they deserve.

    Now add China to this. If someone wants to really sell in China, have the product say Made In USA.
    Give me a relay with big enough contacts, and I'll run the world!

    You can be anything you want......As long as you don't suck at it.

    If a person wants to create a machine that will be more likely to fail...Make it complicated.

    USAF 98 Bomb Wing 1960-66 SMW Lu49

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    28,199
    Post Likes
    I like to use Locatelli Romano for Pesto. Most parms are too mild for me.

    PHM
    ----------------




    Quote Originally Posted by hvacker View Post
    Pistachios are another good substitute for pine nuts. Here, people sell pine nuts on the road. A cash crop for them.
    Put a sheet under the tree and hit it with your pickup. The tree not the sheet.
    If someone doesn't like pesto it's usually because of cheap cheese. I only use Parmigiano Reggiano. Most others smell like gym shoes. And don't even consider the dried stuff. Boars Head and Murray's are good.
    I've been told hard cheese is not as bad as the soft cheeses. Don't ask me why but something to do with the cholesterol.
    Fresh basil is easy to grow even in a kitchen. I've got some Greek basil growing now I haven't tried yet.
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    28,199
    Post Likes
    Olive Oil !!!!!!!!!

    Do Not Buy ANY olive oil unless it has the California Olive Oil Commission emblem on it!

    Virtually All other olive oils are adulterated. The mafia has moved really extensively into olive oil all across the Mediterranean and has become Really sophisticated with their 'cutting the product' efforts. Well; from what I understand anyway. <g>

    And the COOC people are truly friggin Nazi's about oil purity.

    I like to grow all the basil for pesto. In NJ it grows like an uncontrollable weed - but in Florida I have trouble with it. Plus; I eat so much - that quick I forgot the name!!!! What is it called?

    Sliced (small) tomatoes, garlic salt, some italian spices, fresh black pepper, a slice of fresh mozzarella, and a basil leaf. Some EVOO over it all. OH! Caprese' salad!

    Anyway; I eat so much of that that it's hard to accumulate garden basil for pesto. <g>

    PHM
    ---------------


    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    High quality pesto is almost impossible to find, and if you do, you'll have to pay an arm and a leg to get it. Classic pesto also has a cheese in it and pine nuts. For long term health reasons, I've cut back on over 90% of my normal dairy intake. And once the pine nuts jumped from 8 bucks per pound to over $30 per pound, they often go rancid before the consumer gets them. So I've substituted walnuts and you can't really tell the difference.

    Don't be afraid of the olive oil. I've been meaning to make a write up on basic health thingies, and if I can ever get that together, I'll post it here. Bottom line, there are health benefits to a good quality olive oil.

    Anyway, it is best to use the spring growth, but can be made anytime you get your hands on inexpensive basil. Remember, typically, when the price goes down, it is in season and will be fresher. Concentrated fresh basil as in this recipe will have almost a peppery flavor to it.

    You can use this for most anything. Dipping, fresh veggie stir fry (add after frying and just before plating), even on eggs.

    I don't have a food processor, only a blender. So if you have a food processor and know how to use it, that would probably be better.



    PESTO 7/12
    2 Cups yield


    The motivation or impetus for this recipe was the large bunches of basil for only a buck at our local farmers market in springtime. Depending on the season, to get the same amount, it would probably take three to five bunches from our local grocer at a greater cost per bunch. By the time I’m done removing the leaves from the bigger stems, I have a pretty full and well rounded mound of leaves covering most of a ~10” dinner plate.

    Regarding olive oil, I have found the Trader Joe’s Premium 100% Kalamata Extra Virgin one quart+ for $8.99 to be a great value and product. A good quality of olive oil will always enhance the flavor of any pesto recipe. You can spend (a lot?) more to get an inferior product, no need for the ultra high end oils; after all, this is about the fresh and intense ‘spicy’ basil flavor.

    One thing to take note of is that the flavors will blend and mellow after sitting overnight. This may seem obvious, but there is a bigger point . . . For example, as I was playing with the ratio of ingredients, one batch tasted too salty after making it; but was wonderful the next day. Even this recipe may taste of a bit too much salt and garlic after making it, but the next day that flavor will mellow and blend into something very yummy.

    Put into a blender:
    1 C Olive oil
    1.5 t Salt
    2 t Vinegar (preserves color)
    And loosely fill blender with basil leaves (to start) then pulse blender (no need for a lid).

    After pulsing the blender - - I do everything in this recipe with the blender on medium speed, top up blender with more leaves and pulse again. Keep pulsing. Add another small handful of basil, but start packing it in now. I pulse it a few times after each addition. Add more leaves as necessary, pack, and mix the blended and new leaves with spoon. Continue until no more leaves. Sometimes I add more oil. Don’t worry about adding too much oil, if the oil raises to the surface after a day or so, you can use it to flavor other cooking.

    After all basil is in blender, now add:
    6 Lrg Cloves garlic, peeled and quartered

    As garlic blends, you can slowly add:
    1 C Walnuts

    You will notice it getting thicker. The more walnuts you add, the slower you will need to add them. You may need to turn the blender off to “release” an occasional air bubble. I used to just stop adding the walnuts when it got thick, then I began measuring them and found a cup to be about what I was using. More or less is okay to adjust for consistency.

    Personally, I like to keep the blending to a minimum during this last stage. But I enjoy a more coarse texture. If you like it creamy smooth, blend it longer.
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    28,199
    Post Likes
    Make a lot when you have the opportunity. You can put it into ice cube trays, or small tupperware's, and freeze it. There is nothing like having some people over on New Years Day and serving fresh pesto. <g>

    PHM
    ------------


    Quote Originally Posted by 2sac View Post
    Is there a shelf life on the pesto?
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    28,199
    Post Likes
    Keep pinching off the tops, and most especially the seeds, and the basil plant will grow all new young tender leaves for you. As it does - pull off the big tough leaves and toss them.

    PHM
    -------------


    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    Sometimes the leaves from older plants later in the season [like now] won't make good pesto. The flavor just sort of falls flat or turns more bitter.
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    columbus, OH
    Posts
    7,049
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    Olive Oil !!!!!!!!!

    Sliced (small) tomatoes, garlic salt, some italian spices, fresh black pepper, a slice of fresh mozzarella, and a basil leaf. Some EVOO over it all.

    PHM
    ---------------
    Also good with smoked salmon chopped on it.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Bay Area California
    Posts
    27,956
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Day four, not the brilliant green, but just tasted it and it taste awe-freakin-some.

    Will be eating the last of it tonight. Will have meat and greens, with sliced carrot fried in olive oil on the side, and the last scoops of the pesto on top of the fried carrots.


    Quote Originally Posted by 2sac View Post
    Is there a shelf life on the pesto?
    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Bay Area California
    Posts
    27,956
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    I stopped putting cheese in my pesto. Can't remember exactly why. Maybe because I was looking for that intense basil flavor. Also stopped using walnuts as in the recipe.

    I started using walnuts because I figured the flavor and texture was similar to pine nuts. Then started using almonds because I always have them in the house. I was actually surprised to see walnut in the recipe when I went to make it last weekend.


    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    I like to use Locatelli Romano for Pesto. Most parms are too mild for me.

    PHM
    ----------------
    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Bay Area California
    Posts
    27,956
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    There was a pretty extensive study done several years ago, testing the various olive oils, and that one I mentioned from Trader Joes came out front and center. In the top ten or five, something like that.

    There are other specialty olive oils that have super special flavors, and cost a lot of money, but that one mentioned from Trader Joes is a superior product at an every day use price.


    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    Olive Oil !!!!!!!!!

    Do Not Buy ANY olive oil unless it has the California Olive Oil Commission emblem on it!

    Virtually All other olive oils are adulterated. The mafia has moved really extensively into olive oil all across the Mediterranean and has become Really sophisticated with their 'cutting the product' efforts. Well; from what I understand anyway. <g>

    And the COOC people are truly friggin Nazi's about oil purity.

    I like to grow all the basil for pesto. In NJ it grows like an uncontrollable weed - but in Florida I have trouble with it. Plus; I eat so much - that quick I forgot the name!!!! What is it called?

    Sliced (small) tomatoes, garlic salt, some italian spices, fresh black pepper, a slice of fresh mozzarella, and a basil leaf. Some EVOO over it all. OH! Caprese' salad!

    Anyway; I eat so much of that that it's hard to accumulate garden basil for pesto. <g>

    PHM
    ---------------
    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Bay Area California
    Posts
    27,956
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Sounds like a good plan, but not sure it'll ever make it to the ice cube trays. I'm kind of like a flavor whore. When things are in season, I am a gluten for the flavor.



    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    Make a lot when you have the opportunity. You can put it into ice cube trays, or small tupperware's, and freeze it. There is nothing like having some people over on New Years Day and serving fresh pesto. <g>

    PHM
    ------------
    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Bay Area California
    Posts
    27,956
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    I've never grown it. Sounds like a simple project for next season.

    As a child, my brother and I always had a garden. Grew stuff I would never eat. But Mom and Dad loved the fresh produce. When I bought my house, after things settled down, I made a big garden. Played around and had lots of fun. Then other things seemed to take over.

    Right now, at this point in my life, and seeing how much I love the intense flavor of my fresh pesto, I really should put in a bunch of plants next season.

    Thanks


    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    Keep pinching off the tops, and most especially the seeds, and the basil plant will grow all new young tender leaves for you. As it does - pull off the big tough leaves and toss them.

    PHM
    -------------
    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Bay Area California
    Posts
    27,956
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    The last of the pesto. Four days later, color not bright, but still super yummy !!

    Not bad for a bunch of left overs, LOL.

    Name:  20190411_183614.jpg
Views: 25
Size:  73.5 KB
    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    28,199
    Post Likes
    Clearly you are mis-gauging my interpretation of what A Lot actually is. <g>

    Which reminds me of something.

    I have a crazy doctor friend who not too long ago married a supermodel looking yoga instructor. They were shopping somewhere and at a farmer's market saw buckets and buckets of fresh basil. It was bundled into maybe 2" diameter bunches but included the roots. It was sitting out in the back of the store. She asked and was told that it was too (something) to sell and was headed for a trash. He made a deal to buy all of it for ten dollars or so.

    She called me from his house and asked if I could bring over a food processor. When I got there with it they had two large food processors going and four or five blenders. All making pesto. He is truly insane and before the day was over had burned up every machine. Which he gleefully replaced - we went to the store and bought a half dozen Really nice ones. I kept one and he kept the others - for 'spares' he said.

    His take home pay is over $10,000. a week and he spends every penny. <g>

    So anyway; we make pesto all day. She strips the leaves, he slams the ingredients into machines, I drink really excellent red wine, and she puts th pesto into many dozens of stool sample containers. He assured me that he had only stolen new ones from the hospital.

    Eventually he is too drunk to move, laying on the DR floor, and she and I sit on the deck with a fire and reflect. She does some yoga looking dancing by the fire (somewhere I have pictures of that) and I happen to see the piles of basil stems sitting by the trash.

    I wonder if they will grow ask if I can have them. She says sure and we load them all into my truck. Back at my house I don't even un-bundle them - I just point all my fingers and plunge them into the soil in planters and pots and shove the bundled basil into the hole. I plant them all that way and water them whenever I think about.

    Well; it ALL grew and in a short time I had so much basil that I made a huge batch of pesto before the first frost. <g>

    That was in NJ. In FL it doesn't grow nearly as well. I don't know why.

    PHM
    -----------


    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    Sounds like a good plan, but not sure it'll ever make it to the ice cube trays. I'm kind of like a flavor whore. When things are in season, I am a gluten for the flavor.
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Bay Area California
    Posts
    27,956
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Another great story !!

    Yeah, I only make two cups at a time. Gone within the week.


    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    Clearly you are mis-gauging my interpretation of what A Lot actually is. <g>

    Which reminds me of something.

    I have a crazy doctor friend who not too long ago married a supermodel looking yoga instructor. They were shopping somewhere and at a farmer's market saw buckets and buckets of fresh basil. It was bundled into maybe 2" diameter bunches but included the roots. It was sitting out in the back of the store. She asked and was told that it was too (something) to sell and was headed for a trash. He made a deal to buy all of it for ten dollars or so.

    She called me from his house and asked if I could bring over a food processor. When I got there with it they had two large food processors going and four or five blenders. All making pesto. He is truly insane and before the day was over had burned up every machine. Which he gleefully replaced - we went to the store and bought a half dozen Really nice ones. I kept one and he kept the others - for 'spares' he said.

    His take home pay is over $10,000. a week and he spends every penny. <g>

    So anyway; we make pesto all day. She strips the leaves, he slams the ingredients into machines, I drink really excellent red wine, and she puts th pesto into many dozens of stool sample containers. He assured me that he had only stolen new ones from the hospital.

    Eventually he is too drunk to move, laying on the DR floor, and she and I sit on the deck with a fire and reflect. She does some yoga looking dancing by the fire (somewhere I have pictures of that) and I happen to see the piles of basil stems sitting by the trash.

    I wonder if they will grow ask if I can have them. She says sure and we load them all into my truck. Back at my house I don't even un-bundle them - I just point all my fingers and plunge them into the soil in planters and pots and shove the bundled basil into the hole. I plant them all that way and water them whenever I think about.

    Well; it ALL grew and in a short time I had so much basil that I made a huge batch of pesto before the first frost. <g>

    That was in NJ. In FL it doesn't grow nearly as well. I don't know why.

    PHM
    -----------
    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    9,775
    Post Likes
    Herb are usually easy to grow and the mints might be the easiest.
    I try to grow Greek and Italian basil. I hope I can get my buns in gear and get some planting done. I have trouble growing most everything. No green thumb. Nut that won't stop me from trying.
    Give me a relay with big enough contacts, and I'll run the world!

    You can be anything you want......As long as you don't suck at it.

    If a person wants to create a machine that will be more likely to fail...Make it complicated.

    USAF 98 Bomb Wing 1960-66 SMW Lu49

  16. #36
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Bay Area California
    Posts
    27,956
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    What's the difference? Which one is the one I'm most familiar with? Like the most common in the store.

    Any advantage of one over the other?


    Quote Originally Posted by hvacker View Post
    Herb are usually easy to grow and the mints might be the easiest.
    I try to grow Greek and Italian basil. I hope I can get my buns in gear and get some planting done. I have trouble growing most everything. No green thumb. Nut that won't stop me from trying.
    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    28,199
    Post Likes
    I don't like Greek basil as well as I like Sweet basil - which I think is the same as Italian basil. Greek basil has a kind of a harsh, or vaguely bitter, 'edge' to it.

    In my experience Sweet basil is the most common in grocery stores and the like.

    PHM
    ------------


    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    What's the difference? Which one is the one I'm most familiar with? Like the most common in the store.

    Any advantage of one over the other?
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  18. #38
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Bay Area California
    Posts
    27,956
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    I remember hearing the term sweet basil. Seems late in the season to get something going, but maybe I'll try something now instead of waiting till next year.


    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    I don't like Greek basil as well as I like Sweet basil - which I think is the same as Italian basil. Greek basil has a kind of a harsh, or vaguely bitter, 'edge' to it.

    In my experience Sweet basil is the most common in grocery stores and the like.

    PHM
    ------------
    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    9,775
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    What's the difference? Which one is the one I'm most familiar with? Like the most common in the store.

    Any advantage of one over the other?

    Might be little advantage. Soil and climate make huge differences with grapes and probably other crops. Should the basil be used before or after blooming? Al sorts of unknowns. Except by the pros.
    I never did a critical taste test. Maybe this year. I have a long 2' pot that grows oregano and basil. Mexican oregano is not worth growing me thinks.
    Give me a relay with big enough contacts, and I'll run the world!

    You can be anything you want......As long as you don't suck at it.

    If a person wants to create a machine that will be more likely to fail...Make it complicated.

    USAF 98 Bomb Wing 1960-66 SMW Lu49

  20. #40
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Bay Area California
    Posts
    27,956
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    If you wait till it blooms, that will likely make some of the worst pesto you've ever tasted. Well, not puke bad, just won't have that special pop to it.

    As stated, in my experience, the best pesto comes from the leaves early in the season.


    Quote Originally Posted by hvacker View Post
    Might be little advantage. Soil and climate make huge differences with grapes and probably other crops. Should the basil be used before or after blooming? Al sorts of unknowns. Except by the pros.
    I never did a critical taste test. Maybe this year. I have a long 2' pot that grows oregano and basil. Mexican oregano is not worth growing me thinks.
    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •