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  1. #1
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    Tube Deburring Techniques



    This clip provides an in-depth look at the deburring process and addresses proper technique, tools and safety while deburring.

  2. #2
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    I was asking some of the other techs in the company if they deburred, some actually asked "what for?"


    Sent from my van

  3. #3
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    If you're very careful with your tubing cutter, you might be able to get away without deburring.The main reasons for deburring are to make a nice smooth flare surface and to remove any loose pieces of copper so they don't get into the system.


  4. #4
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    I'm well aware, some techs don't seem to get it though...


    Sent from my van

  5. #5
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    .....hoping the video helps them to understand the need. Thanks for your support.

  6. #6
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    I always only cut through my tube 3/4 of the way ,,, I was trained this way in 1st year & it has stuck ever since...

    This way your cutting wheel is not forcing the burr inside the tubing ,, I can then just brake my tube off....

    I still de-burr to get a nice edge , but I do believe it takes less off the wall too...
    The primary function of the design engineer is to make things difficult for the fabricator and impossible for the serviceman.

  7. #7
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    I would think you take a chance on flattening the pipe.
    Quote Originally Posted by fridg View Post
    I always only cut through my tube 3/4 of the way ,,, I was trained this way in 1st year & it has stuck ever since...

    This way your cutting wheel is not forcing the burr inside the tubing ,, I can then just brake my tube off....

    I still de-burr to get a nice edge , but I do believe it takes less off the wall too...

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by lytning View Post
    I would think you take a chance on flattening the pipe.
    You get to know when it's easy to snap ,,, most times I pull up short & can't snap it ,,,, so a bit more cutting & it snaps like a hot knife through butter...
    The primary function of the design engineer is to make things difficult for the fabricator and impossible for the serviceman.

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