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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    15
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    Heat Pump Comparison Between Carrier 20 Greenspeed vs. Trane XV20i

    Just purchased 30+ year old wood frame on slab home on lake in Northern Virginia, 2400 sq feet, all electric. Pretty damp area year round given on lake and pretty high humidity 6 months of year. Need to install new heat pump system.

    Naturally want efficiency and comfort with whole system (heat pump, air handler, IAQ devices etc.) but especially sensitive to a) mold, b) other air quality factors (e.g. constant air cleaning, dehumidification in summer, VOCs etc.)

    So far have estimates from:

    CARRIER
    a) INFINITY® 20 HEAT PUMP WITH GREENSPEED™ INTELLIGENCE
    25VNA0
    or b) INFINITY® 19 HEAT PUMP
    25HNB9

    TRANE
    XV20i Variable Speed

    At stage of life where I want highest quality / best value and am willing to pay for it, within reason. Likely this is my last home (am 63 years old) so want it done right.

    Know the installation is crucial so have two reputable firms ... but would really appreciate comments and opinions on these two heat pump brands / products? Advice on Carrier Infinity 20 Greenspeed (or 19) vs. Trane XV201?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    SW Wisconsin
    Posts
    6,627
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    Since you are in a high humidity area; make sure the equipment is not oversized, especially in respect to duct sizing capacity - using manual D along with plenty of Return-Air filter area sizing for a low velocity through filters.

    Do what is cost effective to reduce heat-gain in summer heat-loss in cold weather; then do a Manual J loads-calc.
    This is the most effective way you reduce your monthly energy costs.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    40,766
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    Just for fun I looked at the numbers of the 3 you mentioned and 2 other variable capacity heat pumps.

    Greenspeed 3 ton with matching AH
    SEER 20.50
    EER 14.50
    HSPF 13.00
    Capacity at 17 out 31,000

    Infinity 19
    SEER 19.00
    EER 14.00
    HSPF 9.50
    Capacity at 17 out 22,600

    XV20i
    SEER 19.75
    EER 13.50
    HSPF 10.00
    Capacity at 17 out 25,800

    Lennox XP25
    SEER 21.50
    EER 13.50
    HSPF 10.00
    Capacity at 17 out 21,000

    Nordyne FT4BI IQ Drive
    SEER 21.00
    EER 13.00
    HSPF 9.60
    Capacity at 17 out 22,000 but unit shuts off at outdoor ambient of 14°

    So for cooling, they are about the same. The Greenspeed blows the others away with HSPF and low temp heating.

    Something to consider: while these claim above average dehumidification, there are MANY times of the year there is no need for cooling but the humidity is high. Consider a whole house dehumidifier for those times or for mild weather and heating.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,846
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    IMO, the Greenspeed is best. There are two ways to size the equipment however. Option 1. is to size for the cooling load and enjoy superior dehumidification in summer due to the ramping down of the system to 30% of full capacity. Option 2. is to oversize for cooling but enjoy lowered energy bills in the winter as there will be greater capacity to heat at 100% of load. The science of the whole thing is that with a single or 2-stage system, the designer would normally design for the cooling season so as to not oversize the equipment and result in short cycling and poor humidity control. But with a modulating system, you can oversize by up to a full tone (12,000 Btu's) and still enjoy good summer humidity control because the system can ramp down to only 30$% of full capacity.

    So if the cooling load on a home is 36,000 Btu's, a 2-stage HP can ramp down to about 24,000 Btu's and ramp up to 36,000 Btu's for summer. It will have about 36,000 Btu's for heating at 47°F.

    A modulating system could be sized for 48,000 Btu's and is capable of ramping down to about 14,400 Btu's in summer for exceptional humidity control and still provide up to 48,000 Btu's at 47°F. This higher Btu output at 47°F will translate into more Btu's available from the HP at temperatures below 47°, thus delaying the need for auxillary heating in winter, thus providing higher efficiency/lower cost winter heating bills. As stated earlier by another, the HSPF is highest with the Greenspeed from Carrier.
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