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  1. #53
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    30
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    Okmulgee, graduated on a Friday, hopped in a van with the "ol'pro" on Monday, was given a van and running commercial calls on Friday.

    Back when I finished, 1980, if you didn't understand ref. & elec., it was your own fault.

  2. #54
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Kenilworth NJ
    Posts
    1,589
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    Thread Starter


    I spoke to a 18 year old buddy of mine who said he was on a bus and saw a sign that said they would teach him to be an electrician, and get him a job. He says to himself 'SOLD!! where do I sign up?'

    I had to set him down and explain to him that the trade schools are not all the same - which reminded me of this thread.

    It is the time of year when High schoolers are getting close to graduation and counselors are telling them what they need to do with themselves.

    This thread is not out of date, and more usefull than ever.
    Hmmmm....smells like numbatwo to me.

  3. #55
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    syracuse Ny
    Posts
    96
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    Well ive been in the field on and off since i was a sr in high school. I been trying for a few months to find work. I was told back in march that it would be hard to hire me because i did not have my epa. So in july i went and took a class and got my universal EPA. Tried for another month to find work, no luck with out going to a trade school or something like that. i took a temp job building a refrigerant load stand and lab. not that rapped up and no luck finding work, im going Wednesday to take out the student loans and go back to school for a 6 months class. so hopefully i can make this work out and get back in the field.

  4. #56
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Currently in Massachusetts, but in the near future, will be moving to Delaware
    Posts
    10
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    I just finished at a program here in Mass. I've been in construction for many years and was looking to get into building/facilities maintenance. Every job I looked at wanted some sort of HVAC training, so I did some research and decided on Porter & Chester Institute-Westboro. The course (day class) is 1 year. They break it down so you spend 12 weeks on each subject: Oil heat, Gas heat, A/C and Refrigeration. The classes are from 7:30-12:40 Mon-Fri. The first 6 weeks of each section is all electrical: contactors, relays, safeties, etc. The second 6 weeks, you work on the equipment. I found it pretty challenging but enjoyable. I learned a lot and I feel pretty confident in my abilities. I also understand that I don't know everything and also understand that, until I can prove myself, I'm the gofer. That's ok with me, I really enjoyed the A/C-Refrigeration portion and would like to get involved with that. Anyways, I found the instructors to be very knowledgeable. Class size during the day was relatively small, so you could get help easily. I got my EPA 608 Universal and OSHA10 certifications. I can tear down and rebuild oil burners, do comb. efficiencies, clean or remove heat exchangers. Remove and replace refrigerant, troubleshoot. I worked hard at it, so I feel I got a lot out of it. It was expensive $25k, but that did include tools and books. The school does have a job placement service (I believe it's lifetime) and if you feel you need a tune up on something, they let you go back and monitor a class (free). I also think you can go in and work on the equipment for practice (not sure on that one 100%). I liked the school and I would recommend it. They also have a full time PM class and a night class which is 3 days a week and runs 18 months. With the night class they get into ducting and piping a little bit more than the day classes. But here in Mass, you can't run pipe unless you're a licensed pipefitter. There you go, my $.02.

  5. #57
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    York PA.
    Posts
    2
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    Smile YTI York PA>

    I just wanted to post that my school(YTI) is a pertty good school. I will be done with school in 8 days and I have learned alot. EPA, osha, trac-pipe, wardflex certifications. I hope to be able to find a job after all that they have taught me. All in all yti is a good school.

  6. #58
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    OKC, OK
    Posts
    26
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    Just got my pro membership and doing a bit of looking around! Thought I 'd drop my opinion in here - if ya don't mind?!?

    I work for a large commercial company here in OKC, and run my own smaller company on the side. I've personally never had any schooling and think the best thing is to take an apprentice job and work your way up - in "the field" as stated earlier!

    If one is to go to school - that's fine -I would suggest Okmulgee, for around here - or maybe even Metro Tech. Plan on around $16,000 to $20,000 for cost - and approximately 2 years of schooling!

    With that said - I would like to make a suggestion to students, grads, etc... Don't graduate and walk into a job acting as though you know it all! Time and time again, my company hires a new grad who "knows everything". They refuse to listen to anyone, refuse to ask questions, screw up everything they touch, and always have a butt-load of excuses in the end! You can graduate with straight A's, but if you've never done it before - you need to listen to those who have!

    I don't think it has much of anything to do with what you do or don't learn in school - it has much more to do with your attitude!

    This is a trade where you will NEVER know everything! The best friends I've made in this trade are the ancient-old-guys that have been doing this since I was in diapers - And I made those friends by LISTENING!

    p.s. I would also agree with the Local Union suggestion, here in Oklahoma you can go Union for your education and always go none-union later (if you don't wind up liking the whole union bit!) The union here has great benifits and pay - but seems to leave a lot of guys sitting at home during those winter months?!?

  7. #59
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1
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    I find it a little strange that someone who is considering getting into the field, wouldn't do a little leg work before making the investment. Ask questions from local companies and the people that work there. I am starting a program next month, but before I decided to register, I spoke to people in the HVAC community around here, and even have a job set up fpr the spring as a helper with a company that said they recommend the school I chose, and if I can prove my worth over the summer months, then there would probably be full time union work for me when I am finished. The point is, I am already looking forward to see what my prospects are, meeting people, and asking a lot of questions so that when the time comes, I will be ready.

  8. #60
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    1
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    Hey guys, sorry for opening up this old thread. I'm new here and new to hvac as a whole. I'm really interested in the trade and would like to get into it. I was wondering if anyone knew about NYC's City Tech program for hvac? They have an associates degree and some certs that say on their website that it will prepare you for a job in the industry. Does anyone have any experience with them? Thank you in advance.

  9. #61
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Apache Junction, Arizona
    Posts
    1,132
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    Old threads never die unless deleted..

    I not in the NYCs area but I took HVAC as a Major and Management as a Minor in El Paso Community College. I think anyplace that can teach you the basics and some hands-on work on the trade is great.. but the real teacher is the Field.

    Good Luck
    "I never lie because I don't fear anyone. You only lie when you're afraid." - John Gotti

    “Always shoot first . . . that way they know you’re armed!” - Orrin Porter Rockwell

    "Individuals and entities performing contracting work illegally and without a license place the public at risk and effectively steal millions from Arizona's hardworking, law-abiding contractors and their employees," - Jeff Fleetham, director of the Arizona Registrar of Contractors.

  10. #62
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Kenilworth NJ
    Posts
    1,589
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by Nico Cocco View Post
    Hey guys, sorry for opening up this old thread. I'm new here and new to hvac as a whole. I'm really interested in the trade and would like to get into it. I was wondering if anyone knew about NYC's City Tech program for hvac? They have an associates degree and some certs that say on their website that it will prepare you for a job in the industry. Does anyone have any experience with them? Thank you in advance.
    I dunno about that one - it has been a while since I spoke to grads of a tech school in NYC. I remember TCI was considered decent - I knew a grad that was pretty good. But I think that was more him, than the school.

    Across the river in NJ Lincoln Tech was big. I never met a grad from lincoln tech that was worth anything. The worst part was the grads KNEW they hadn't learned anything and were pretty grumpy about the 15k+ in student debt they carried when they had not much to show for it.

    ICE is a standard HVAC tradeschool final exam of sorts, some schools will include siting you down for the NATE exam. If a school will claim to prep you for something like that, and tell you they have a good pass rate, it would be a good indication they will at least try to teach you something.

    I hope it helps. I tend to agree that one learns a lot in the field, but it isn't really helpful to someone who is new to the industry to tell them that only, as it creates an impossible barrier to entry (I can't get a job till I know something, but I cannot learn till I am in the field - with a job that I can't get till I know something) I try to say - learning in the field is the best, BUT here is a way to get there. Its a little more helpful IMHO.

    I entered the trade with no trade school - It worked well for me, but not everyone is self-motivated or has an aptitude for such things. Just layin that out there as an option for ya. Find a company that will take a chance on you, do your time as a low-paid scrub, study the whole time, and then get yourself a FAT raise when you can demonstrate a little aptitude. I went from 12/hr helper to 35/hr project manager and lead tech in 3.5 years in this way.

    Your results may vary.
    Hmmmm....smells like numbatwo to me.

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