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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
    Posts
    42,333
    Post Likes

    Wow, my shoulder does not hurt anymore...

    WOW, my shoulder does not hurt anymore... well not as much...

    Finally took some time to clean out my VETO XL...
    Removed 5 hand tools, about enough misc hardware to fill a 16 oz coffee cup, and a dozen or so misc odd fittings...

    The strap does not weigh down my right shoulder as much... it 'almost' feels light.

    SOOOOOOOOOOO

    Has anyone else decided to clean out there tool pouch and take a load off...
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    GA's basic rules of home heating and AC upgrades:
    *Installation is more important than the brand of equipment
    *The duct system keeps the house comfortable; the equipment only heats and cools (and dehumidifies)
    *Cheap is not good, good is not cheap; however expensive is not a guarantee of quality!
    Choose your contractor wisely!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    32,037
    Post Likes
    Yes.

    I now leave my pouch in the truck, put a few tools that I think I will need into a bucket (yep) and rope it up onto the roof.

    My whole upper body feels better.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist
    Member, IAEI

    AOP Forum Rules:







  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Billington Heights, NY
    Posts
    21,628
    Post Likes
    i dont have a pouch i have a 4 drawer, 1 top tray toolbox that i have to clean out sometimes. I need to do it again, but the last time i did it i removed 8 pounds of fittings, scraps, unused tools, and other crap. it does make a large difference.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Amarillo by mornin'
    Posts
    1,013
    Post Likes
    Went from a large back pack to a back pack/roll around bag...surprisingly enough, my back is not sore at the end of the day anymore. (DUH!)
    "It's not that I'm smart, it's that I stay with the problem longer”
    Albert Einstein

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Anchorage Alaska / Seattle WA
    Posts
    205
    Post Likes
    Heating calls = 10 in 1 screwdriver, small wide mouth crescent wrench, small screw gun, fluke 87, flash light, channel locks, needle nose pliers, all in a very small old military canvas bag.... If I need more than that it is too complex...
    For the Government to Give Something to you - THEY HAVE TO TAKE IT WAY FROM SOMEONE ELSE FIRST...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Anchorage Alaska / Seattle WA
    Posts
    205
    Post Likes
    oh and one other thing..... a few jumper wires with clips...
    For the Government to Give Something to you - THEY HAVE TO TAKE IT WAY FROM SOMEONE ELSE FIRST...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    26,677
    Post Likes
    I clean my LC out about once a week.

    I'll tell ya what, though. During that cold spell, my LC didn't leave the truck. I had my Carhartt bibs on, dropped a meter, a 6 in 1, an 8" crescent and my small 1/4" socket set in various pockets and did what I needed to do. Most calls were just heat that wasn't able to keep up, so I didn't do a lot of fixing, just check the heat, verify operation and move on.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Mid-Mo
    Posts
    3,600
    Post Likes
    I "carry" an ideal brand tool belt that has my meter, channel locks, strippers, crimpers, side cutters, 10 in 1, electrical tape, flashlight and lockout lock. If I need anything else then back to the truck I go. More walking isn't always a bad thing...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Coastal Maine
    Posts
    1,092
    Post Likes
    I keep my backpack in the front seat of the truck. I usually only do startups or problematic calls. But during our cold spell, I was having to run calls too, to keep up. After the first day of dragging that backpack up on roofs and to penthouse mechanical rooms, I scrapped it for a 10 n 1, 8" Crescent, and multimeter. With those and my leatherman, I could either fix it or diagnose enough to go get only the tools that I needed.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    florida
    Posts
    1,403
    Post Likes
    I used to use a tool pouch, then decided to give my left hip a break and bought a tool bag [about 2 ft. long],then I gradually added more tools to it every so often until it was so heavy I needed one of those collapsible hand trucks to drag it around...so, I tossed that and bought a very small bag that has just enough room for what I really need...

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    423
    Post Likes
    I do mostly refer and carry a 11&1 screw driver, needle nose, service wrench, 10" crescent, impact gun with a few bits, meter, and my gauges. I've tried down sizing my bag several times, getting smaller each time. Doesn't seem to work for me as I tend to constantly add to it, putting me right back where I started. So over the years I've learned to keep it simple and carry the basics. With this I can at least determine what the problem is, and go from there.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    3,773
    Post Likes
    I just use that little veto tool pouch, you can only fit in so many tools and they are the important ones and I hang my 902 from the tape holder. If I do an install I break out the veto tech bag with the heavy hitters, If I'm working complex electrical troubleshooting I break out the fluke 371 with the detachable face and the rope attachment amprobe and go to it.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
    Posts
    42,333
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    I like my XL... it is the right size to carry lots of stuff or little stuff... the smaller version of this bag may or may not work the same.

    I am thinking to get one of those 'Husky' open top carpenter's box style bag (long, open top, long handle), and put the installation stuff in it. Then it is easy to just grab the other bag along with the VETO when doing a full install.

    Specialty tools and stuff... stay in the van until needed.
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    GA's basic rules of home heating and AC upgrades:
    *Installation is more important than the brand of equipment
    *The duct system keeps the house comfortable; the equipment only heats and cools (and dehumidifies)
    *Cheap is not good, good is not cheap; however expensive is not a guarantee of quality!
    Choose your contractor wisely!

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